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Neil Gaiman wins Newbery medal

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  • David Emerson
    Here s the version that was in the Minneapolis StarTribune:
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 26, 2009
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      Here's the version that was in the Minneapolis StarTribune:

      Twin Cities author Neil Gaiman has won the 2009 Newbery medal, children's literature's most prestigious award.

      Gaiman won for "The Graveyard Book," the story of a boy named Nobody Owens who lived in a graveyard and was educated by ghosts.

      The award was announced today at the annual meeting of the American Library Association in Denver.

      On his blog, Gaiman said last year, "I think 'The Graveyard Book' is a book for pretty much all ages, although I'm not sure how far down that actually starts. I think I would have loved it when I was eight, but I don't think that all eight-year olds were like me.

      "It has a protagonist who is about eighteen months old in the first chapter, four in the second chapter, six in the third, and so on, until, by chapter eight, he is all of sixteen years old. There's no sex in it and no swearing. There is some really scary stuff in there, and a few of the people (all adults) who have read it have written to tell me they cried in the last chapter."

      Gaiman, a British journalist, moved to the Twin Cities area several years ago. He has written novels, comic books, children's books, and films, and two years ago wrote an adaptation of the British saga "Beowulf" for the big screen. His latest film, "Coraline," an animated moved based on his own horror novella, is scheduled to open Feb. 6.

      He is the third Twin Citian to win the Newbery; the first was Carol Ryrie Brink, an Idaho native who was living in St. Paul when she won the award in 1936 for "Caddie Woodlawn." The second was Kate DiCamillo, who won the award in 2004 for her third book, "The Tale of Despereaux."

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