Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: The Company They Keep

Expand Messages
  • Cole Matson
    Message 1 of 24 , Mar 13, 2008
      <<It's only fair to mention that there are some other brilliant books up
      this year, in particular John D. Rateliff's "The History of The Hobbit".
      (Also the Marquette conference collection, and Verlyn Flieger's "Interrupted
      Music", and Marjorie Burns's "Perilous Realms", not to mention some other
      very good books.)>>

      Thanks for bringing these to my attention. I'd heard of them, but didn't
      remember they were in consideration the same year as Ms. Glyer's book! I'll
      have to reserve judgment then until I've read these. And the stack of
      to-be-read grows effortlessly higher and higher...

      Cole


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • John D Rateliff
      I can t speak to my own work, of course, but you shd definitely move PERILOUS REALMS and INTERRUPTED MUSIC to the top of your pile. Burns doesn t just
      Message 2 of 24 , Mar 13, 2008
        I can't speak to my own work, of course, but you shd definitely move
        PERILOUS REALMS and INTERRUPTED MUSIC to the top of your pile. Burns
        doesn't just elegantly sort out the Norse vs. Celtic dichotomy but
        presents the best case I've ever seen for Tolkien as not an "either/
        or" author but a "both/and" one, stressing his ability to see and
        fairly present both sides of an issue. It's a fine refutation of
        those who think he sees everything in black-and-white. And Flieger's
        is quite simply one of the two or three best books ever written about
        Tolkien.
        --JDR

        On Mar 13, 2008, at 2:41 PM, Cole Matson wrote:
        > <<It's only fair to mention that there are some other brilliant
        > books up
        > this year, in particular John D. Rateliff's "The History of The
        > Hobbit".
        > (Also the Marquette conference collection, and Verlyn Flieger's
        > "Interrupted
        > Music", and Marjorie Burns's "Perilous Realms", not to mention some
        > other
        > very good books.)>>
        >
        > Thanks for bringing these to my attention. I'd heard of them, but
        > didn't
        > remember they were in consideration the same year as Ms. Glyer's
        > book! I'll
        > have to reserve judgment then until I've read these. And the stack of
        > to-be-read grows effortlessly higher and higher...
        >
        > Cole
      • Doug Kane
        ... I haven t gotten to the much-praised _The Company They Keep_ or _Perilous Realms_ yet (soon!), but I do want to second John s comment about _Interrupted
        Message 3 of 24 , Mar 13, 2008
          --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, John D Rateliff <sacnoth@...> wrote:
          >
          > I can't speak to my own work, of course, but you shd definitely move
          > PERILOUS REALMS and INTERRUPTED MUSIC to the top of your pile. Burns
          > doesn't just elegantly sort out the Norse vs. Celtic dichotomy but
          > presents the best case I've ever seen for Tolkien as not an "either/
          > or" author but a "both/and" one, stressing his ability to see and
          > fairly present both sides of an issue. It's a fine refutation of
          > those who think he sees everything in black-and-white. And Flieger's
          > is quite simply one of the two or three best books ever written about
          > Tolkien.
          > --JDR

          I haven't gotten to the much-praised _The Company They Keep_ or _Perilous Realms_ yet (soon!), but I do want to second John's comment about _Interrupted Music_. I didn't think there was any way that Flieger could equal or exceed _Splintered Light_ but she has done so. I agree with John that it is one of the two or three best books ever written about Tolkien.

          That having been said, I can't say which I would choose between _Interrupted Music_ and John's own _The History of The Hobbit_. John's book is a ground-breaking labor of love (with the emphasis on labor because it obviously was a HUGE amount of work) that is a must-read for any fan of Tolkien's.

          The award may need to just get split into pieces this year. ;-)

          Doug

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Andrew Higgins
          To All I just finished The Company they Keep a week ago (and the pile still gets higher). Really enjoyed it. It sheds some really interesting light on all
          Message 4 of 24 , Mar 16, 2008
            To All

            I just finished The Company they Keep a week ago (and the pile still gets higher). Really enjoyed it. It sheds some really interesting light on all the Inklings (including ones like Barfield and Dyson) and has made me very interested in reading the works of Charles Williams. It did destroy one illusion I had and that is that the Inklings used to gather at the Bird and the Baby on Thursdays to read their works where actually they did this in C.S. Lewis' rooms in Magdlen college on Tuesday mornings to read their works and Thursday night was more of a leisurely drinking, chatting Inklings event. When I went to the Bird and the Baby for the first time (of many since I have moved to London) I was waxing poetical about Tolkien, Lewis, et al sitting in the back room reading sections from The Hobbit, The Lost Road, Out of the Silent Planet, etc - but it was probably more likely that just bits and pieces of Elvish poetry was heard in the drinking bouts! An excellent book -
            how the Inklings influenced each other, competed with each other and potrtrayed each other in their works (as I am finding as I read C.S. Lewis Out of the Silent Planet and the character of Ransom the philologist dreaming of learning the verb tense for inhabitants of Malacandra being J.R.R. himself). A great read.

            They just came out with The History of the Hobbit in paperback here in the UK and it was a great excuse to purchase another copy of this and re-read - one of the best researched books I have read in a while.

            Cheers, Andy

            Cole Matson <ccematson@...> wrote:
            <<It's only fair to mention that there are some other brilliant books up
            this year, in particular John D. Rateliff's "The History of The Hobbit".
            (Also the Marquette conference collection, and Verlyn Flieger's "Interrupted
            Music", and Marjorie Burns's "Perilous Realms", not to mention some other
            very good books.)>>

            Thanks for bringing these to my attention. I'd heard of them, but didn't
            remember they were in consideration the same year as Ms. Glyer's book! I'll
            have to reserve judgment then until I've read these. And the stack of
            to-be-read grows effortlessly higher and higher...

            Cole

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






            Andrew Higgins
            asthiggins@...
            07710953556 (M)
            02072742383 (H)
            Blackberry PIn 20150592

            "Alles ist nach seiner Art, an ihr wirst du nichts andern." Siegfried Act 2
            http://wotanselvishmusings.blogspot.com
            http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=833145056



            ---------------------------------
            Rise to the challenge for Sport Relief with Yahoo! for Good

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • David Bratman
            ... Williams can be a challenge. His novels are often considered a good place to start, but one way to get a discussion going among Williams readers is to ask
            Message 5 of 24 , Mar 16, 2008
              >At 12:35 PM 3/16/2008 +0000, Andrew Higgins wrote:

              >I just finished The Company they Keep a week ago (and the pile still gets
              >higher). Really enjoyed it. It sheds some really interesting light on all
              >the Inklings (including ones like Barfield and Dyson) and has made me very
              >interested in reading the works of Charles Williams.

              Williams can be a challenge. His novels are often considered a good place to start, but one way to get a discussion going among Williams readers is to ask which novel a new reader should try first. My vote goes to _War in Heaven_.

              >It did destroy one
              >illusion I had and that is that the Inklings used to gather at the Bird and
              >the Baby on Thursdays to read their works where actually they did this in
              >C.S. Lewis' rooms in Magdlen college on Tuesday mornings to read their works
              >and Thursday night was more of a leisurely drinking, chatting Inklings
              >event.

              It's a common illusion that you've had punctured. But you do have the days wrong: reading meetings in Lewis's rooms at Magdalen were usually in the evenings (often but not always Thursdays, and sometimes some Inklings would meet for readings during the day, but again in the college rooms, not in the pub). The pub sessions were Tuesday noons in the Inklings' heyday: these were general literary conversation (Lewis hated small talk), both serious and light, lubricated by beer and cider, rather than drinking bouts.

              Although Glyer has some criticisms of Humphrey Carpenter's interpretations and conclusions in his _The Inklings_, both she and I would highly recommend the book: it's an excellent narrative history of the group that's readable and has great value. It covers Tolkien only lightly, as he'd already been thoroughly discussed in Carpenter's earlier _Tolkien: A Biography_, still the only good full biography of Tolkien.

              David Bratman
            • Alana
              ... See, I d vote _Greater Trumps,_ but that s just because it s my favorite (and I think that it has the most clear depiction of coinherence as a physical as
              Message 6 of 24 , Mar 16, 2008
                > Williams can be a challenge. His novels are often considered a
                >good place to start, but one way to get a discussion going among
                >Williams readers is to ask which novel a new reader should try
                >first. My vote goes to _War in Heaven_.

                See, I'd vote _Greater Trumps,_ but that's just because it's my
                favorite (and I think that it has the most clear depiction of
                coinherence as a physical as well as psychical possibility). You're
                right, though, I bet this is an easy discussion to start... :)

                -Alana #2
              • Marc Drayer
                ... Myself, I d start with Descent into Hell and work outward from there. That s my favorite, and gives a perfect example of coinherence and substituted love.
                Message 7 of 24 , Mar 16, 2008
                  --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, "Alana" <artiephesus@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > > Williams can be a challenge. His novels are often considered a
                  > >good place to start, but one way to get a discussion going among
                  > >Williams readers is to ask which novel a new reader should try
                  > >first. My vote goes to _War in Heaven_.
                  >
                  > See, I'd vote _Greater Trumps,_ but that's just because it's my
                  > favorite (and I think that it has the most clear depiction of
                  > coinherence as a physical as well as psychical possibility). You're
                  > right, though, I bet this is an easy discussion to start... :)
                  >
                  > -Alana #2
                  >
                  Myself, I'd start with Descent into Hell and work outward from there.
                  That's my favorite, and gives a perfect example of coinherence and
                  substituted love.

                  Marc
                • John D Rateliff
                  ... I too wd suggest WAR IN HEAVEN, with THE GREATER TRUMPS as the alternate if the person I was suggesting it to had a strong interest in the tarot. CSL of
                  Message 8 of 24 , Mar 16, 2008
                    On Mar 16, 2008, at 10:48 AM, David Bratman wrote:

                    >> At 12:35 PM 3/16/2008 +0000, Andrew Higgins wrote:
                    >> . . . has made me very interested in reading the works of Charles
                    >> Williams.
                    >
                    > Williams can be a challenge. His novels are often considered a
                    > good place to start, but one way to get a discussion going among
                    > Williams readers is to ask which novel a new reader should try
                    > first. My vote goes to _War in Heaven_.

                    I too wd suggest WAR IN HEAVEN, with THE GREATER TRUMPS as the
                    alternate if the person I was suggesting it to had a strong interest
                    in the tarot. CSL of course started with PLACE OF THE LION, and it
                    seems to have been his favorite to recommend to new readers, but I'm
                    glad I didn't start with that one. Avoid SHADOWS OF ECSTASY until
                    after you've read most if not all of the others.

                    --JDR

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Ellen
                    I finally got around to reading Williams last year and read THE GREATER TRUMPS, followed by WAR IN HEAVEN. I liked them both, but I think I liked THE GREATER
                    Message 9 of 24 , Mar 17, 2008
                      I finally got around to reading Williams last year and read THE GREATER
                      TRUMPS, followed by WAR IN HEAVEN. I liked them both, but I think I
                      liked THE GREATER TRUMPS best. It even made me want to get a set of
                      tarot cards because I knew almost nothing about them and wanted to see
                      the images. I don't think Williams will ever be a favorite of mine, but
                      I did like the books and would like to read his other novels at some point.

                      Ellen Denham

                      Alana wrote:
                      >
                      > > Williams can be a challenge. His novels are often considered a
                      > >good place to start, but one way to get a discussion going among
                      > >Williams readers is to ask which novel a new reader should try
                      > >first. My vote goes to _War in Heaven_.
                      >
                      > See, I'd vote _Greater Trumps,_ but that's just because it's my
                      > favorite (and I think that it has the most clear depiction of
                      > coinherence as a physical as well as psychical possibility). You're
                      > right, though, I bet this is an easy discussion to start... :)
                      >
                      > -Alana #2
                      >
                      >


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Sarah Beach
                      I actually started with ALL HALLOWS EVE. I m not sure why, as I don t think that at the time I knew much of anything about any of the plots of Williams books.
                      Message 10 of 24 , Mar 17, 2008
                        I actually started with ALL HALLOWS EVE. I'm not sure why, as I don't
                        think that at the time I knew much of anything about any of the plots
                        of Williams' books. I just knew that Lewis had liked his work
                        immensely. (This may be back in the Dark Ages, either before or
                        around the time I actually joined the MythSoc.)

                        But I really loved ALL HALLOWS EVE. In part it was that I am also an
                        artist in addition to being a writer, and his description of the
                        reactions to Jonathan's paintings was sort of the way I wished people
                        could experience art (not necessarily mine, but any art). And then
                        too, his understanding of the spiritual dimension ... well, resonated
                        truthfully to me, in a way I'd never encountered in fiction before.
                        So I was hooked.

                        ALL HALLOWS EVE remains my favorite, followed by DESCENT INTO HELL,
                        THE GREATER TRUMPS, and WAR IN HEAVEN. The others are just there.


                        --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, Ellen <carnimiriel@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > I finally got around to reading Williams last year and read THE
                        GREATER
                        > TRUMPS, followed by WAR IN HEAVEN. I liked them both, but I think
                        I
                        > liked THE GREATER TRUMPS best. It even made me want to get a set
                        of
                        > tarot cards because I knew almost nothing about them and wanted to
                        see
                        > the images. I don't think Williams will ever be a favorite of
                        mine, but
                        > I did like the books and would like to read his other novels at
                        some point.
                        >
                        > Ellen Denham
                        >
                        > Alana wrote:
                        > >
                        > > > Williams can be a challenge. His novels are often considered a
                        > > >good place to start, but one way to get a discussion going among
                        > > >Williams readers is to ask which novel a new reader should try
                        > > >first. My vote goes to _War in Heaven_.
                        > >
                        > > See, I'd vote _Greater Trumps,_ but that's just because it's my
                        > > favorite (and I think that it has the most clear depiction of
                        > > coinherence as a physical as well as psychical possibility).
                        You're
                        > > right, though, I bet this is an easy discussion to start... :)
                        > >
                        > > -Alana #2
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                      • alexeik@aol.com
                        ... From: Marc Drayer To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com Sent: Mon, 17 Mar 2008 12:03 am Subject: [mythsoc] Re: The Company They Keep Myself,
                        Message 11 of 24 , Mar 17, 2008
                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: Marc Drayer <mdrayer2001@...>
                          To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Mon, 17 Mar 2008 12:03 am
                          Subject: [mythsoc] Re: The Company They Keep






                          Myself, I'd start with Descent into Hell and work outward from there.
                          That's my favorite, and gives a perfect example of coinherence and
                          substituted love.

                          Marc

                          <<
                          It's a great book, but it's also his most densely written, and might be a little off-putting to someone who is completely new to his style.
                          Alexei









                          RECENT ACTIVITY



                          1

                          New Members


                          Visit Your Group



                          Y! Entertainment

                          World of Star Wars

                          Rediscover the force.

                          Explore now.



                          Yahoo! News

                          Fashion News

                          What's the word on

                          fashion and style?



                          Sell Online

                          Start selling with

                          our award-winning

                          e-commerce tools.




                          .





                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Grace Donaldson
                          ... interest ... I m ... Ah, I started with _Place of the Lion_, after reading Sayer s bio _Jack_...and while I ve been meaning to read _All Hallow s Eve_ and
                          Message 12 of 24 , Mar 17, 2008
                            --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, John D Rateliff <sacnoth@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > I too wd suggest WAR IN HEAVEN, with THE GREATER TRUMPS as the
                            > alternate if the person I was suggesting it to had a strong
                            interest
                            > in the tarot. CSL of course started with PLACE OF THE LION, and it
                            > seems to have been his favorite to recommend to new readers, but
                            I'm
                            > glad I didn't start with that one. Avoid SHADOWS OF ECSTASY until
                            > after you've read most if not all of the others.
                            >
                            > --JDR

                            Ah, I started with _Place of the Lion_, after reading Sayer's bio
                            _Jack_...and while I've been meaning to read _All Hallow's Eve_ and
                            _War in Heaven_ since then, sigh...the first one was too much for me...

                            Grace
                          • Diane Joy Baker
                            I started with *Place of the Lion* and continued with *Greater Trumps.* *All Hallow s Eve* was the first one I tried, but I couldn t get into it. ... From:
                            Message 13 of 24 , Mar 18, 2008
                              I started with *Place of the Lion* and continued with *Greater Trumps.* *All Hallow's Eve* was the first one I tried, but I couldn't get into it.

                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: Grace Donaldson
                              To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Monday, March 17, 2008 3:49 PM
                              Subject: [mythsoc] Re: The Company They Keep


                              --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, John D Rateliff <sacnoth@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > I too wd suggest WAR IN HEAVEN, with THE GREATER TRUMPS as the
                              > alternate if the person I was suggesting it to had a strong
                              interest
                              > in the tarot. CSL of course started with PLACE OF THE LION, and it
                              > seems to have been his favorite to recommend to new readers, but
                              I'm
                              > glad I didn't start with that one. Avoid SHADOWS OF ECSTASY until
                              > after you've read most if not all of the others.
                              >
                              > --JDR

                              Ah, I started with _Place of the Lion_, after reading Sayer's bio
                              _Jack_...and while I've been meaning to read _All Hallow's Eve_ and
                              _War in Heaven_ since then, sigh...the first one was too much for me...

                              Grace





                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.