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Lewis review in the movies

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  • David Bratman
    In the film In the Valley of Elah , there s an unexpectedly hilarious moment when Tommy Lee Jones (crusty old retired soldier) is going to read a bedtime
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 6, 2008
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      In the film "In the Valley of Elah", there's an unexpectedly hilarious moment when Tommy Lee Jones (crusty old retired soldier) is going to read a bedtime story to the young son of Charlize Theron (police detective and single mother).

      He picks up the book, which is a paperback of _The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe_, leafs through it silently, and when the boy says, "You're supposed to read it to me," he replies, "I don't understand one word of it."

      So as the boy's name is David, he tells him the story of David and Goliath instead, hence the title of the film, that being where the battle took place. Imagine the film being named for Narnia instead: it would terribly confuse everyone waiting for the _Prince Caspian_ film.
    • Lynn Maudlin
      That s wild, David - what was the implication that the Jones character couldn t understand a word? Did he not *read* or did he not grasp the concept? -- Lynn
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 6, 2008
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        That's wild, David - what was the implication that the Jones character
        couldn't understand a word? Did he not *read* or did he not grasp the
        concept?

        -- Lynn --

        --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, David Bratman <dbratman@...> wrote:
        >
        > In the film "In the Valley of Elah", there's an unexpectedly
        hilarious moment when Tommy Lee Jones (crusty old retired soldier) is
        going to read a bedtime story to the young son of Charlize Theron
        (police detective and single mother).
        >
        > He picks up the book, which is a paperback of _The Lion, the Witch
        and the Wardrobe_, leafs through it silently, and when the boy says,
        "You're supposed to read it to me," he replies, "I don't understand
        one word of it."
        >
        > So as the boy's name is David, he tells him the story of David and
        Goliath instead, hence the title of the film, that being where the
        battle took place. Imagine the film being named for Narnia instead:
        it would terribly confuse everyone waiting for the _Prince Caspian_ film.
        >
      • David Emerson
        ... Maybe it was the edition that was translated into Klingon? :-) emerdavid ________________________________________ PeoplePC Online A better way to Internet
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 6, 2008
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          >> He picks up the book, which is a paperback of
          >>_The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe_, leafs
          >>through it silently, and when the boy says,
          >>"You're supposed to read it to me," he replies,
          >>"I don't understand one word of it."
          >>
          >That's wild, David - what was the implication that the Jones character
          >couldn't understand a word? Did he not *read* or did he not grasp the
          >concept?

          Maybe it was the edition that was translated into Klingon? :-)

          emerdavid

          ________________________________________
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        • David Bratman
          ... The character was certainly literate (and fairly computer savvy, too). I d guess the intended implication of the scene was that he didn t have a mind
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 6, 2008
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            At 12:55 AM 3/7/2008 +0000, Lynn Maudlin wrote:

            >That's wild, David - what was the implication that the Jones character
            >couldn't understand a word? Did he not *read* or did he not grasp the
            >concept?

            The character was certainly literate (and fairly computer savvy, too). I'd guess the intended implication of the scene was that he didn't have a mind attuned to that high-falutin' literary stuff: a plain Biblical tale of heroism against great odds was more his meat. If so, LWW was a rather incongruous book by those standards, and I'd therefore presume the script didn't specify it. Perhaps the set people just handed the actor a likely-looking book and that happened to be it.
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