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Lord Aslan and Lord Asriel

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  • Jason Fisher
    [Lynn Maudlin] ... [John Rateliff] ... For what it s worth, this is true for me as well. He does a much better job in Till We Have Faces than in The Chronicles
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 12, 2007
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      [Lynn Maudlin]
      >> Lewis was trying to make Aslan as much like Jesus
      >> as he could imagine [...]

      [John Rateliff]
      > Well, all I can say is that for me he failed utterly. I
      > can only read the books if I 'suspend disbelief' and
      > treat Aslan as a purely fictional character [...]

      For what it's worth, this is true for me as well. He does a much better job in Till We Have Faces than in The Chronicles of Narnia, but even there, I still have to suspend my disbelief.

      > I suspect others have the reverse problem with
      > Pullman; they read his fantasy as if he were writing
      > a realistic novel about our world, and react accordingly.

      Yes, I think so. Many of the posts I've read online recently seem to convey just such a (mis)understanding. Now I'm not defending Pullman -- though in the main, I did enjoy his trilogy, and I am looking forward to his forthcoming Book of Dust, in which he hints he will tackle the question of Jesus directly.* One can certainly level any number of valid criticisms of his books on literary grounds; but too many readers decry his works as purely polemic, but otherwise realistic, novels promoting an atheist agenda. Such a judgment, I think, is somewhere between gross oversimplification (at best) and outright mischaracterization (at worst).

      Jason



      * In a recent interview, Pullman said, "His [Jesus's] omission from HDM [His Dark Materials] was deliberate; I'm going to get around to Jesus in the next book [The Book of Dust]. I have plenty to say about him."
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