Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

CS Lewis

Expand Messages
  • Hugh Davis
    I am going to have the chance (finally) to teach an independent study on CS Lewis. I teach high school, and I have an excellent student with an avid interest
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 11, 2007
      I am going to have the chance (finally) to teach an independent study on CS Lewis. I teach high school, and I have an excellent student with an avid interest in the works of CSL. Could members of this list who are willing to send me sample syllabi?

      Thanks in advance,

      Hugh
      _________________________________________________________________
      Get the power of Windows + Web with the new Windows Live.
      http://www.windowslive.com?ocid=TXT_TAGHM_Wave2_powerofwindows_122007

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Marc Drayer
      Hmmm...The closest I can come to a syllabus is a course by the Teaching Company called The Life and Writings of C.S. Lewis by Professer Lou Markos of Houston
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 11, 2007
        Hmmm...The closest I can come to a syllabus is a course by the
        Teaching Company called "The Life and Writings of C.S. Lewis" by
        Professer Lou Markos of Houston Baptist University. The guidebook
        which comes with it has the essential information. You can find that
        on http://www.teach12.com

        Also, you can reach Professor Markos directly at lmarkos@...

        He will be glad to help you out on this. He has done so with me.I hope
        that helps you out, Hugh. That is an excellent course, btw.

        Under the Mercy,
        Marc Drayer


        --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, Hugh Davis <HughHDavis@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > I am going to have the chance (finally) to teach an independent
        study on CS Lewis. I teach high school, and I have an excellent
        student with an avid interest in the works of CSL. Could members of
        this list who are willing to send me sample syllabi?
        >
        > Thanks in advance,
        >
        > Hugh
        > _________________________________________________________________
        > Get the power of Windows + Web with the new Windows Live.
        > http://www.windowslive.com?ocid=TXT_TAGHM_Wave2_powerofwindows_122007
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • John D Rateliff
        Congratulations, Hugh. Let us know how it goes. If you have access to one of the tapes of CSL reading, you shd definitely play a bit of it for your students;
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 11, 2007
          Congratulations, Hugh. Let us know how it goes.
          If you have access to one of the tapes of CSL reading, you shd
          definitely play a bit of it for your students; there's nothing like
          hearing the actual voice of the person you're studying.
          --John R.


          On Dec 11, 2007, at 7:10 PM, Hugh Davis wrote:
          > I am going to have the chance (finally) to teach an independent
          > study on CS Lewis. I teach high school, and I have an excellent
          > student with an avid interest in the works of CSL. Could members of
          > this list who are willing to send me sample syllabi?
          >
          > Thanks in advance,
          >
          > Hugh
        • Lynn Maudlin
          you might contact Diana Glyer (author of previously discussed The Company They Keep: J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis as Writers in Community ); her website is
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 13, 2007
            you might contact Diana Glyer (author of previously discussed "The
            Company They Keep: J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis as Writers in
            Community"); her website is {the place of the lion dot com} all run
            together, her email address is on the contact page (it will simply be
            truncated by the system here). Diana has taught quite a few Lewis
            courses at Azusa Pacific Univ. so I'm sure she'd have some great
            insight for you.

            And enjoy!

            -- Lynn --
            --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, Hugh Davis <HughHDavis@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > I am going to have the chance (finally) to teach an independent
            study on CS Lewis. I teach high school, and I have an excellent
            student with an avid interest in the works of CSL. Could members of
            this list who are willing to send me sample syllabi?
            >
            > Thanks in advance,
            >
            > Hugh
            > _________________________________________________________________
            > Get the power of Windows + Web with the new Windows Live.
            > http://www.windowslive.com?ocid=TXT_TAGHM_Wave2_powerofwindows_122007
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Cole Matson
            Hugh, I highly recommend having the student help create the syllabus, since it is an independent study. I did an independent study on CSL in college, and
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 13, 2007
              Hugh,

              I highly recommend having the student help create the syllabus, since it is
              an independent study. I did an independent study on CSL in college, and
              created my own reading list, course description and requirements, and area
              of focus, which were approved or adjusted by my professor as necessary. My
              theme was "C.S. Lewis: The Christian Storyteller." I put together a reading
              list of major CSL works I hadn't yet read (and a review of a few key ones I
              had), including his fiction, apologetics, and academic work (e.g. The
              Discarded Image). I focused on works that related to my theme, so I read a
              lot of essays that looked at the role of literature (such as "On Stories",
              "Sometimes Fairy Stories May Say Best What Needs to Be Said").

              Each week, I did my self-assigned reading for the week, and wrote a one-page
              response paper. I also kept a reading journal of my thoughts as I read,
              which formed the basis for each week's paper. I then met with my professor
              for about 45 minutes each week, read the paper, and then we discussed my
              conclusions and the reading. The weekly papers helped form the basis of a
              final 10-12 page term paper on the course's main theme. (The paper ended up
              being on the value of fantasy literature to today's world, especially in
              terms of moral and spiritual development.)

              It was very much self-motivated, and I had to seek out a professor who had
              some knowledge of Lewis. I particularly wanted one who shared his and my
              Christian faith, so that I would be arguing about Lewis and not about
              Christianity. As you can imagine, such a professor was difficult to find at
              New York University, which is not known for being a bastion of faith. I
              ended up finding one not only in a different department, but in a different
              school within my university (Prof. Anthony Low, who specialized in Milton
              and other medieval and Renaissance Christian literature). But I found the
              challenge of creating my own course and carrying it out not only incredibly
              liberating, but also incredibly fun. Since it looks like I'm not going to be
              able to get back to graduate school for at least another year, I'm using the
              same skills to create my own truly independent study in the meantime.

              I'll e-mail you the syllabus I created. Best of wishes to you and your
              student for a remarkable class!

              Cole


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • WendellWag@aol.com
              In a message dated 12/14/2007 12:00:45 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, ccematson@gmail.com writes: I then met with my professor for about 45 minutes each week,
              Message 6 of 10 , Dec 13, 2007
                In a message dated 12/14/2007 12:00:45 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
                ccematson@... writes:

                I then met with my professor
                for about 45 minutes each week, read the paper, and then we discussed my
                conclusions and the reading.
                So you did a British-style tutorial, where you have to write a short paper
                each week and read it to your tutor? That's interesting, since I would have
                thought that was rare in the U.S. At my undergraduate school, New College in
                Sarasota, Florida, which emphasized independent study, people frequently did
                tutorials, but it tended to be more like going to a professor and agreeing
                before the term started on what you would study and what work you would turn
                in. You generally didn't go to see the professor again that much. Sometimes
                you didn't see him again until the term was over.

                Wendell Wagner



                **************************************See AOL's top rated recipes
                (http://food.aol.com/top-rated-recipes?NCID=aoltop00030000000004)


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Cole Matson
                Message 7 of 10 , Dec 16, 2007
                  << So you did a British-style tutorial, where you have to write a short
                  paper
                  each week and read it to your tutor? That's interesting, since I would have
                  thought that was rare in the U.S. At my undergraduate school, New College in
                  Sarasota, Florida, which emphasized independent study, people frequently did
                  tutorials, but it tended to be more like going to a professor and agreeing
                  before the term started on what you would study and what work you would turn
                  in. You generally didn't go to see the professor again that much. Sometimes
                  you didn't see him again until the term was over.>>

                  Yes, it was similar to a British-style tutorial, by design. I haven't found
                  a U.S. school that makes tutorials common practice, and it's not SOP at NYU.
                  I remember that independent studies did require regular meetings with your
                  instructor, but I think the number and intervals of those meetings were free
                  to be set by you and the instructor (and really could have been just once at
                  the beginning and once at the end). I originally proposed meeting every
                  other week, but my professor wanted to meet weekly. If I remember correctly,
                  he was fond of the tutorial system as well (I had learned about it from
                  reading about Lewis's days at Oxford), so it was a good fit for us.

                  Cole


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.