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Re: Age for Hobbit

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  • William Cloud Hicklin
    ... Hobbit_, if you read it as ... I was nine- in fifth grade, Marty Trinkle the chaplain s daughter (whom actually I didn t like that much) recommended it, I
    Message 1 of 19 , Oct 31, 2007
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      --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, juliet@... wrote:
      >
      > How old were you when you first read _The
      Hobbit_, if you read it as
      > a child?

      I was nine- in fifth grade, Marty Trinkle the chaplain's
      daughter (whom actually I didn't like that much)
      recommended it, I think because I liked the Oz books. So
      I checked it out from the little post library (this was a
      tiny US base in Germany, its library stocked with other
      libraries' castoffs). And checked it out again, and
      again, and again, and...

      I remember that copy extremely well, and am now convinced
      that, although rebound, it was one of the precious second
      UK printing, with color plates: not only do I remember
      distinctly being nonplussed by the Lord of the Rings'
      revised story of the Riddle-game, I am virtually certain
      that I had never seen the 'Eagle-picture' until Pictures
      By JRR Tolkien came out, whereas 'Bilbo Comes to the Huts
      of the Raft-elves' was familiar.
    • Diane Joy Baker
      Read as a teen, late teens. I read HOBBIT and LOTR before NARNIA. ... From: Linda DeMars To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday, October 29, 2007 8:30 PM
      Message 2 of 19 , Oct 31, 2007
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        Read as a teen, late teens. I read HOBBIT and LOTR before NARNIA.
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Linda DeMars
        To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, October 29, 2007 8:30 PM
        Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Age for Hobbit


        I actually was 29 or 30 when I read it. I had seen it asm recommended
        reading for many years and cannot imagine why I did not read it at the time
        since I had been a fan of George MacDonald for many years. The little girls
        next door had been gifted with THE PRINCESS AND THE GOBLIN and THE PRINCESS
        AND CURDIE ( and all of the Laura Ingalls Wilder books, too) by their aunt,
        an old maid school - but I was the one who received the joy.

        I bought THE HOBBIT for reading matter when my eldest was in hospital to
        have her tonsils removed. I read it in a day. Several weeks later I was
        going to Fort Worth, Texas, and brought THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING and THE
        TWO TOWERS to read on my trip.

        Guess what - I finished the first one the night before we left- I started
        the second and finished it on the plane- I did read it so fast that I
        thought Frodo was really dead. Then, for several weeks, I looked all over
        Fort Worth, Dallas and all the way down to San Antonio. (1968)

        I came home and found the book ( ROTK) in the airport and stayed up all
        night reading it. Finished it the next day---and have read it many many
        times.

        I had seen reviews of the Narnia books and also seen them in the library. I
        wasn't really impressed with the infro on the book jackets.but there was a
        proghram on television where a man told children about books ( sort of a
        teaser) and drew a picture of the acion while he was reading. We got the
        first Narnia when my second daughter had chicken pox (eldest age 8, and
        second age 4, first son age one). We head them all- then we reread them for
        the first son and later for the last son. The middle son has listened to
        them on tape with much joy.

        Last year I gave some of he Narnia books to my eldest granddaughter, and
        this yeear she received THE HOBBIT on CD for her ninth birthday.

        Linda D.

        I was fortunate enought to take my eldest grandson to the Narnia movie, and
        we gave the girl mentioned above the Narnia movie for her 8th birthday.

        On 10/29/07, Croft, Janet B. <jbcroft@...> wrote:
        >
        > I was seven, and I read it before I read Narnia.
        >
        > Janet
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com <mythsoc%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:
        > mythsoc@yahoogroups.com <mythsoc%40yahoogroups.com>] On Behalf Of
        > juliet@... <juliet%40firinn.org>
        > Sent: Monday, October 29, 2007 4:15 PM
        > To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com <mythsoc%40yahoogroups.com>
        > Subject: [mythsoc] Age for Hobbit
        >
        > How old were you when you first read _The Hobbit_, if you read it as
        > a child? I have a seven-year-old who's read most of the Chronicles of
        > Narnia and I'm starting to think about when I want to hand my copy of
        > The Hobbit over to her.
        >
        > Julie
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Ginger McElwee
        Interestingly, I cannot remember when I read The Hobbit for the first time, but I know I was in high school. I read LOR immediately afterwards, and then
        Message 3 of 19 , Nov 1, 2007
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          Interestingly, I cannot remember when I read The Hobbit for the first time,
          but I know I was in high school. I read LOR immediately afterwards, and
          then reread them many times before I graduated. I didn't discover CS Lewis
          until I was in my mid twenties and was thinking about converting to
          Christianity. An Episcopal priest who knew I loved Tolkien loaned me copies
          of Decent into Hell by Williams and The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe.
          He apparently knew me well because I loved both books and began reading
          everything I could find by Lewis and Williams.

          Ginger





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jason Fisher
          Since everyone else has chimed in ... I was 7 or 8 years old when I first read The Hobbit. I don t remember precisely, but that first paperback, which I
          Message 4 of 19 , Nov 1, 2007
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            Since everyone else has chimed in ...

            I was 7 or 8 years old when I first read The Hobbit. I don't remember precisely, but that first paperback, which I believe my mother bought new at the time, was a 1977 printing. Contrast that with the fact that I was, uhhh, 36 when I first read The Chronicles of Narnia. :)

            I don't think there's any particular lower age limit for The Hobbit. Even where the style or language might be beyond a child's current reading comprehension, this represents an opportunity to learn. In fact, I'd probably go so far as to say that kids ought to consistently read *beyond* their prescribed "age level". I always did. At the same age I read The Hobbit, I was also reading The Iliad and The Odyssey, and that did me no harm (and probably a lot of good).

            Jason
          • Sara Ciborski
            I will chime in because maybe I win the prize for being the oldest: I was 35 when I first read The Hobbit, and I did so only because someone gave me the
            Message 5 of 19 , Nov 1, 2007
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              I will chime in because maybe I win the prize for being the oldest: I
              was 35 when I first read The Hobbit, and I did so only because someone
              gave me the Ballantine four-book paperback box set (The Hobbit + LotR)
              for Christmas--and I wanted to read the books in the right order. If The
              Fellowship of the Rings had not been right at hand, next in the box, I
              might not have gone on, as I thought The Hobbit was good but not great.
              Now after many readings of everything Tolkien wrote it has become a
              beloved re-read. Last year I read it to my eight-year old grandson. He
              wasn't able to fully appreciate the moral subtleties at the end, but
              otherwise thoroughly enjoyed it. My biggest current challenge these days
              as a grandmother is to prevent his seeing the Jackson films before he
              reads LotR (or ever).

              Sara Ciborski


              Jason Fisher wrote:
              > Since everyone else has chimed in ...
              >
              > I was 7 or 8 years old when I first read The Hobbit. I don't remember precisely, but that first paperback, which I believe my mother bought new at the time, was a 1977 printing. Contrast that with the fact that I was, uhhh, 36 when I first read The Chronicles of Narnia. :)
              >
              > I don't think there's any particular lower age limit for The Hobbit. Even where the style or language might be beyond a child's current reading comprehension, this represents an opportunity to learn. In fact, I'd probably go so far as to say that kids ought to consistently read *beyond* their prescribed "age level". I always did. At the same age I read The Hobbit, I was also reading The Iliad and The Odyssey, and that did me no harm (and probably a lot of good).
              >
              > Jason
              >
              >
              > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • John D Rateliff
              Many thanks, Doug, and many thanks for all who said nice things about the book here; I really appreciate it. I ve been meaning to respond to each one but I ve
              Message 6 of 19 , Nov 5, 2007
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                Many thanks, Doug, and many thanks for all who said nice things about
                the book here; I really appreciate it. I've been meaning to respond
                to each one but I've been on the road off and on for what a while now
                and it's been hard to get on-line, much less have time to make a well-
                considered response. So let me just say that after having worked on
                it for so long, it's good to have it out there, and actually have
                people reading it. I'm looking forward to hearing from folks what
                they think about specific bits in it; please let me know what parts
                you found interesting, what you agreed with and what you didn't, what
                you'd most want to know that I didn't cover, &c.
                By the way, it looks like I'm going to be able to add the missing
                appendix to the trade paperback edition due out next year in England:
                I had Appendix V drafted but had to abandon it in order to get the
                index done in time. It's a listing of the people Tolkien sent his
                author's copies of THE HOBBIT to. Not something whose absence leaves
                a gaping hole, but it's nice to be able to include it; wraps things
                up nicely.
                Thanks again to Doug and all.
                --John R.


                On Oct 31, 2007, at 7:01 PM, Doug Kane wrote:
                > I received my copy in the mail today! I have only had a chance to
                > glance at it, but I am already very excited. Thank you, John, for
                > what promises to be a wonderful resource.
                >
                > Doug
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