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Re: [mythsoc] Re: The Movies

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  • Carl F. Hostetter
    ... But I m not asking for a number. (It is surely, however, far, far from zero.) The point is, while the readers Jackson s movies did garner (certainly _not_
    Message 1 of 30 , Sep 4, 2007
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      On Sep 4, 2007, at 9:38 PM, Mike Foster wrote:
      > So, to turn your question back to you: Would it have been better if
      > all those who _didn't_ read the book _because_ the movies were a
      > _bad_ adaptation of Tolkien, and thus never went on to other Tolkien
      > works and in no case participated in scholarly conferences at
      > Marquette et alia, had never seen this movie?
      >
      > _THAT'S_ the sort of question being asked by the critics of the
      > movies.
      >
      > Carl
      > Well, Carl, we can't know how many did not read et cetera as you note
      > above. We can only know, as John Rateliff notes, that millions DID
      > read
      > the book in the years after the films were shown.
      > In fellowship,
      > Mike
      >

      But I'm not asking for a number. (It is surely, however, far, far
      from zero.) The point is, while the readers Jackson's movies did
      garner (certainly _not_ millions, BTW) are a good, it is not so great
      a number, and therefore not so great a good (even by your own
      calculation), as might have been achieved by a truly good and
      faithful adaptation.

      Cheers,

      Carl
    • Mike Foster
      Again, Carl, we can t know [Hypothesis Contrary To Fact] if a better [Tom Bombadil and Goldberry and Imrahil and Lobelia inclusive?] good and faithful film
      Message 2 of 30 , Sep 4, 2007
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        Again, Carl, we can't know [Hypothesis Contrary To Fact] if a better
        [Tom Bombadil and Goldberry and Imrahil and Lobelia inclusive?] "good
        and faithful" film cycle would have brought more readers to Tolkien.

        As to between zero and millions of readers, I'll back off to tens of
        thousands, while waiting for someone who might have a better sales
        figure to inform us.

        Cheers,
        Mike

        -----Original Message-----
        From: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mythsoc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
        Of Carl F. Hostetter
        Sent: Tuesday, September 04, 2007 8:51 PM
        To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Re: The Movies

        On Sep 4, 2007, at 9:38 PM, Mike Foster wrote:
        > So, to turn your question back to you: Would it have been better if
        > all those who _didn't_ read the book _because_ the movies were a
        > _bad_ adaptation of Tolkien, and thus never went on to other Tolkien
        > works and in no case participated in scholarly conferences at
        > Marquette et alia, had never seen this movie?
        >
        > _THAT'S_ the sort of question being asked by the critics of the
        > movies.
        >
        > Carl
        > Well, Carl, we can't know how many did not read et cetera as you note
        > above. We can only know, as John Rateliff notes, that millions DID
        > read
        > the book in the years after the films were shown.
        > In fellowship,
        > Mike
        >

        But I'm not asking for a number. (It is surely, however, far, far
        from zero.) The point is, while the readers Jackson's movies did
        garner (certainly _not_ millions, BTW) are a good, it is not so great
        a number, and therefore not so great a good (even by your own
        calculation), as might have been achieved by a truly good and
        faithful adaptation.

        Cheers,

        Carl



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Carl F. Hostetter
        ... This is not true: we don t know the _number_ of additional readers, but we certainly do know that there would have been more. ... Sales of a book do not
        Message 3 of 30 , Sep 5, 2007
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          On Sep 4, 2007, at 11:48 PM, Mike Foster wrote:

          > Again, Carl, we can't know [Hypothesis Contrary To Fact] if a better
          > [Tom Bombadil and Goldberry and Imrahil and Lobelia inclusive?] "good
          > and faithful" film cycle would have brought more readers to Tolkien.
          >

          This is not true: we don't know the _number_ of additional readers,
          but we certainly do know that there would have been more.

          > As to between zero and millions of readers, I'll back off to tens of
          > thousands, while waiting for someone who might have a better sales
          > figure to inform us.
          >

          Sales of a book do not equal readers of that book.

          Carl
        • David Bratman
          ... Tens of thousands may be generous. Only those who have gone on to read the books have been brought by the films to the world of Professor Tolkien.
          Message 4 of 30 , Sep 5, 2007
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            At 10:30 AM 9/4/2007 -0700, John D Rateliff wrote:

            >> and brought tens of thousands of new people to the world of
            >> Professor Tolkien.
            >
            >Try millions.

            "Tens of thousands" may be generous. Only those who have gone on to read
            the books have been brought by the films "to the world of Professor
            Tolkien." Those who have only seen the films have been brought to the
            world of Peter Jackson, not to the world of Professor Tolkien.


            At 03:40 PM 9/4/2007 +0000, Merlin DeTardo wrote:

            >The point wasn't whether more people would have seen better films --I
            >don't think anyone on this list was claiming that Jackson, New Line,
            >etc. could have made more money from a more faithful film-- but
            >whether a more faithful film would have brought more people to the
            >book.

            As John Rateliff observantly pointed out, I do believe a better adaptation
            (not necessarily the same as "more faithful", because it's possible to be
            faithful but stultifying) would have been even more successful at the box
            office, but I'm not very sure of that, and it certainly wouldn't have made
            all that much difference financially. I make this argument mostly in the
            context of replying to those who claim that the evisceration of Tolkien
            contributed to the film's financial success.

            But I agree with you that that's not the main point. The main point is
            whether the better adaptation would have brought more readers to the book.
            And of course it would have. John thinks I should not phrase that with
            such certainty, but it is as certain as hypotheticals about human behavior
            can get.


            >One thing I've noticed in online speculaton
            >about the proposed _Hobbit_ movie is a division between those who
            >want the material darkened to match Jackson's LotR --which I found
            >generally to be grimmer in tone (more "Silmarillion"?) than Tolkien's
            >LotR-- and those, like myself, who want the story to keep some of its
            >lightheartedness, with a minimum of dark hints about the Ring, etc.

            What we _want_ is irrelevant, because it's so dead certain that the
            darkened version is what we're going to get whether we want it or not.
            Even Tolkien (as John also noted) was not immune to that impulse -
            sometimes to _The Hobbit_'s improvement, sometimes not - so why would
            filmers, notoriously self-indulgent if Jackson is any example, be immune?

            What I'm waiting to see in a _Hobbit_ film is whether the script has Bilbo
            meeting the ten-year-old Estel (later known as Aragorn) in Rivendell. If
            he does, the film gets an F. If he also meets Arwen, the film gets a
            quintuple F: FFFFF. (A notation otherwise only seen in the climaxes of
            scores by Tchaikovsky.)

            "F", of course, here stands for "Fanboy".


            At 07:47 PM 9/4/2007 +0000, Carl F. Hostetter wrote:

            >> I would think that Tolkien scholars around the world would be happy
            >> about this.
            >
            >This is exactly like saying that Da Vinci scholars should be happy that "The
            >Da Vinci Code"
            >made a jillion dollars and brought millions of new people to the world of Da
            >Vinci. I'll bet you won't find many Da Vinci scholars who are, though.

            It certainly hasn't taught anyone to stop calling him "Da Vinci" as if that
            were his surname. (Sorry: that's a bugaboo of mine, like Aragorn the
            Reluctant King.)
          • David Bratman
            ... As a Tolkien fan, I am used to concept of fighting the long defeat with all the strength, all the will, and all the courage I can bring to it. ... You
            Message 5 of 30 , Sep 5, 2007
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              At 06:35 PM 9/4/2007 -0500, Mike Foster wrote:

              >I agree with David that the films were "pretty good" and that I enjoyed
              >them. They could have been much better in ways great and small, as I've
              >likewise said in this tangled thread. They weren't, but as a Cubs fan
              >and a Catholic, I'm used to the concept of the long defeat.

              As a Tolkien fan, I am used to concept of fighting the long defeat with all
              the strength, all the will, and all the courage I can bring to it.


              >Would it have been better if the many who did read the books for the
              >first time, or like a previous writer today, pulled them off the shelf
              >after the films and re-read them and then went on to other J.R.R.
              >Tolkien works as well as, in some cases, participation in scholarly
              >conferences at Marquette and Aston -et alia-, had never done so?
              >
              >That was the question I posed last week. It's a simple question. So
              >instead of hypothesizing about better Jackson films or whimpering over
              >marred visualization-and for this reader, Frodo will never be Elijah
              >Wood nor Elrond that pointy-browed guy in mind's eye, thanks-answer the
              >question, please and thank you.

              You asked the question, and I answered the question, with the answer you
              wanted. I answered it the same way over two years ago when you brought it
              up then, too. But whenever anybody demands a simple answer to a question,
              especially when the question has long since been answered to their
              satisfaction, it means that they don't want to hear anything else. And I
              refuse to simply call the readers brough to Tolkien by Jackson a good thing
              without adding that readers have been brought to Tolkien by even worse
              adaptations than Jackson, and that more readers would have been brought by
              a better adaptation. It's true whether you call it a hypothesis or not.

              Continuing wilfully to ignore the point, Mike continues in later posts:

              >Again, Carl, we can't know [Hypothesis Contrary To Fact] if a better
              >[Tom Bombadil and Goldberry and Imrahil and Lobelia inclusive?] "good
              >and faithful" film cycle would have brought more readers to Tolkien.

              and

              >we can't know how many did not read et cetera as you note
              >above. We can only know, as John Rateliff notes, that millions DID read
              >the book in the years after the films were shown.

              First off, it seems to be necessary to say, yet again, that the badness of
              the adaptation does not consist of the cuts of smaller characters, but of
              the evisceration of Tolkien's spirit, and that a better film would not
              consist of one with more of Tolkien's plot elements, but one with more of
              his aesthetics and morality. I said this, as clearly as I know how, on p.
              56-57 of my article in _Tolkien on Film_.

              Secondly, you appear to be arguing that since we cannot know how many
              people would have read Tolkien after a better film, or how many were driven
              away from contact with Tolkien by their encounter with Jackson, that the
              problem must be insignificant. That's unworthy of you. We can in fact
              very clearly determine that this is a significant and major problem. I've
              already given the reasons for it in this discussion, and in more detail on
              p. 44-45 of my article in _Tolkien on Film_.

              I wrote that article for the purpose of trying to get past all the stupid,
              irrelevant, lame-brained defenses of Jackson that people have been offering
              here and elsewhere, and having an actual discussion that advances the
              dialectic. If you've read my posts, and read my article, why don't you
              respond to them and take the discussion a step further on, instead of
              ignoring them and going back to square one every ... single ... time? The
              impression your line of argument gives is that my responses are
              unanswerable, as you so conspicuously fail even to attempt to counter them.
              To the extent that you have gone beyond rehashing the same arguments, it
              appears that we are in some agreement, so why go back to the "felix
              peccatum" again and again, when we already agreed on that specific narrow
              point two years ago? Let's go on to the next thing.
            • aveeris523@aol.com
              ... Dianetics by L. Ron Hubbard is the best example of that! Steve Gaddis ************************************** Get a sneak peek of the all-new AOL at
              Message 6 of 30 , Sep 5, 2007
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                In a message dated 9/5/07 6:01:44 AM, Aelfwine@... writes:


                >
                > Sales of a book do not equal readers of that book.
                >
                > Carl
                >
                Dianetics by L. Ron Hubbard is the best example of that!

                Steve Gaddis



                **************************************
                Get a sneak peek of the all-new AOL at
                http://discover.aol.com/memed/aolcom30tour


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Mike Foster
                Dear David, Your opinions are quite clearly expressed. I must wonder, however, if the Inklings, in their spirited discussion of a topic, ever referred to
                Message 7 of 30 , Sep 5, 2007
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                  Dear David,
                  Your opinions are quite clearly expressed.

                  I must wonder, however, if the Inklings, in their spirited discussion of
                  a topic, ever referred to another's opinion as "stupid, lame-brained,
                  irrelevant." Don't you think language like that is more quarrelsome
                  than argumentative?

                  Mike

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mythsoc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                  Of David Bratman
                  Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2007 9:10 AM
                  To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: RE: [mythsoc] Re: The Movies

                  At 06:35 PM 9/4/2007 -0500, Mike Foster wrote:

                  >I agree with David that the films were "pretty good" and that I enjoyed
                  >them. They could have been much better in ways great and small, as I've
                  >likewise said in this tangled thread. They weren't, but as a Cubs fan
                  >and a Catholic, I'm used to the concept of the long defeat.

                  As a Tolkien fan, I am used to concept of fighting the long defeat with
                  all
                  the strength, all the will, and all the courage I can bring to it.

                  >Would it have been better if the many who did read the books for the
                  >first time, or like a previous writer today, pulled them off the shelf
                  >after the films and re-read them and then went on to other J.R.R.
                  >Tolkien works as well as, in some cases, participation in scholarly
                  >conferences at Marquette and Aston -et alia-, had never done so?
                  >
                  >That was the question I posed last week. It's a simple question. So
                  >instead of hypothesizing about better Jackson films or whimpering over
                  >marred visualization-and for this reader, Frodo will never be Elijah
                  >Wood nor Elrond that pointy-browed guy in mind's eye, thanks-answer the
                  >question, please and thank you.

                  You asked the question, and I answered the question, with the answer you
                  wanted. I answered it the same way over two years ago when you brought
                  it
                  up then, too. But whenever anybody demands a simple answer to a
                  question,
                  especially when the question has long since been answered to their
                  satisfaction, it means that they don't want to hear anything else. And I
                  refuse to simply call the readers brough to Tolkien by Jackson a good
                  thing
                  without adding that readers have been brought to Tolkien by even worse
                  adaptations than Jackson, and that more readers would have been brought
                  by
                  a better adaptation. It's true whether you call it a hypothesis or not.

                  Continuing wilfully to ignore the point, Mike continues in later posts:

                  >Again, Carl, we can't know [Hypothesis Contrary To Fact] if a better
                  >[Tom Bombadil and Goldberry and Imrahil and Lobelia inclusive?] "good
                  >and faithful" film cycle would have brought more readers to Tolkien.

                  and

                  >we can't know how many did not read et cetera as you note
                  >above. We can only know, as John Rateliff notes, that millions DID read
                  >the book in the years after the films were shown.

                  First off, it seems to be necessary to say, yet again, that the badness
                  of
                  the adaptation does not consist of the cuts of smaller characters, but
                  of
                  the evisceration of Tolkien's spirit, and that a better film would not
                  consist of one with more of Tolkien's plot elements, but one with more
                  of
                  his aesthetics and morality. I said this, as clearly as I know how, on
                  p.
                  56-57 of my article in _Tolkien on Film_.

                  Secondly, you appear to be arguing that since we cannot know how many
                  people would have read Tolkien after a better film, or how many were
                  driven
                  away from contact with Tolkien by their encounter with Jackson, that the
                  problem must be insignificant. That's unworthy of you. We can in fact
                  very clearly determine that this is a significant and major problem.
                  I've
                  already given the reasons for it in this discussion, and in more detail
                  on
                  p. 44-45 of my article in _Tolkien on Film_.

                  I wrote that article for the purpose of trying to get past all the
                  stupid,
                  irrelevant, lame-brained defenses of Jackson that people have been
                  offering
                  here and elsewhere, and having an actual discussion that advances the
                  dialectic. If you've read my posts, and read my article, why don't you
                  respond to them and take the discussion a step further on, instead of
                  ignoring them and going back to square one every ... single ... time?
                  The
                  impression your line of argument gives is that my responses are
                  unanswerable, as you so conspicuously fail even to attempt to counter
                  them.
                  To the extent that you have gone beyond rehashing the same arguments, it
                  appears that we are in some agreement, so why go back to the "felix
                  peccatum" again and again, when we already agreed on that specific
                  narrow
                  point two years ago? Let's go on to the next thing.



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Merlin DeTardo
                  ...
                  Message 8 of 30 , Sep 5, 2007
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                    ---"Mike Foster" <mafoster@...> wrote:
                    << I must wonder, however, if the Inklings, in their spirited
                    discussion of a topic, ever referred to another's opinion as "stupid,
                    lame-brained, irrelevant." >>


                    "Oh, ****, not another elf"?

                    But seriously: in 1948, Tolkien seems to have criticized Lewis' work so
                    harshly that he later felt the need to explain himself, and to
                    apologize: "I regret causing pain, even if and in so far as I had the
                    right; and I am very sorry indeed still for having caused it quite
                    excessively and unnecessarily" (Letter #113). Though it looks from the
                    letter like the quarrel began not at an Inklings but in correspondence.

                    Is there any more on this incident in _The Company They Keep_?

                    -Merlin DeTardo
                  • David Bratman
                    ... I wish they were; then I might get replies that forwarded the discussion. ... If they didn t, that might be because they didn t express stupid,
                    Message 9 of 30 , Sep 5, 2007
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                      At 11:18 PM 9/5/2007 -0500, Mike Foster wrote:

                      >Your opinions are quite clearly expressed.

                      I wish they were; then I might get replies that forwarded the discussion.

                      >I must wonder, however, if the Inklings, in their spirited discussion of
                      >a topic, ever referred to another's opinion as "stupid, lame-brained,
                      >irrelevant." Don't you think language like that is more quarrelsome
                      >than argumentative?

                      If they didn't, that might be because they didn't express stupid,
                      lame-brained, and irrelevant opinions; and that in turn might be because
                      they had too much sense to try to defend some crappy movie.

                      But in fact the Inklings did express themselves in very quarrelsome terms.
                      To wit:

                      Tolkien: "... a most amusing and highly contentious evening, on which (had
                      an outsider eavesdropped) he would have thought it a meeting of fell
                      enemies hurling deadly insults before drawing their guns."

                      Lewis: "Wrenn almost seriously expressed a strong wish to burn Williams ...
                      Tolkien and I agreed afterwards that we just knew what he meant: that as
                      some people ... are eminently kickable, so Williams is eminently combustible."

                      Lewis to Williams: "I've a good mind to punch your head when we next meet."

                      Lewis to Barfield: "Take that grin off your ugly face."

                      Tolkien about Lewis: "Alas! His ponderous silliness is becoming a fixed
                      manner." And on another occasion: "Doesn't he know what he's talking about?"

                      Warren Lewis: "To read to the Inklings was a formidable ordeal."

                      These are all from chapter 4 of Glyer's _The Company They Keep_.

                      Lastly, I must record the piquant irony of being chided for quarrelsomeness
                      by someone who, quite without justification, has used equally strong
                      language to condemn my posts on Jackson (quoted in a post of mine of Sept.
                      2; I don't care to repeat it again).


                      At 04:44 AM 9/6/2007 +0000, Merlin DeTardo wrote:

                      >But seriously: in 1948, Tolkien seems to have criticized Lewis' work so
                      >harshly that he later felt the need to explain himself, and to
                      >apologize: "I regret causing pain, even if and in so far as I had the
                      >right; and I am very sorry indeed still for having caused it quite
                      >excessively and unnecessarily" (Letter #113). Though it looks from the
                      >letter like the quarrel began not at an Inklings but in correspondence.
                      >
                      >Is there any more on this incident in _The Company They Keep_?

                      Not specifically, I don't think: it's not entirely clear what he's talking
                      about or which book he's referring to, and Glyer's is a work of analysis
                      and connection rather than one of primary research. But there's plenty of
                      material on Tolkien's criticisms of Lewis, on Lewis's of Tolkien, and on
                      everybody's of everybody else's.
                    • William Cloud Hicklin
                      ... their spirited ... another s opinion as stupid, ... criticized Lewis work so ... himself, and to ... in so far as I had the ... having caused it quite
                      Message 10 of 30 , Sep 6, 2007
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                        --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, "Merlin
                        DeTardo" <emptyD@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > ---"Mike Foster" <mafoster@> wrote:
                        > << I must wonder, however, if the Inklings, in
                        their spirited
                        > discussion of a topic, ever referred to
                        another's opinion as "stupid,
                        > lame-brained, irrelevant." >>
                        >
                        >
                        > "Oh, ****, not another elf"?
                        >
                        > But seriously: in 1948, Tolkien seems to have
                        criticized Lewis' work so
                        > harshly that he later felt the need to explain
                        himself, and to
                        > apologize: "I regret causing pain, even if and
                        in so far as I had the
                        > right; and I am very sorry indeed still for
                        having caused it quite
                        > excessively and unnecessarily" (Letter #113).
                        Though it looks from the
                        > letter like the quarrel began not at an
                        Inklings but in correspondence.
                        >
                        > Is there any more on this incident in _The
                        Company They Keep_?
                        >


                        Myself I get the impression that a 'harsh'
                        criticism by Inklings standards would have been
                        akin to Tolkien's (private) "ponderous
                        silliness" comment on Lewis' style. They were,
                        after all, a) British and b) dons.
                      • John D Rateliff
                        ... For Tolkien s attempt to portray what their exchange was like, see the first chapter of THE NOTION CLUB PAPERS (HME.IX). Incidently, I asked several
                        Message 11 of 30 , Sep 6, 2007
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                          On Sep 6, 2007, at 5:44 AM, William Cloud Hicklin wrote:
                          > Myself I get the impression that a 'harsh' criticism by Inklings
                          > standards would have been akin to Tolkien's (private) "ponderous
                          > silliness" comment on Lewis' style. They were, after all, a)
                          > British and b) dons.

                          For Tolkien's attempt to portray what their exchange was like, see
                          the first chapter of THE NOTION CLUB PAPERS (HME.IX).
                          Incidently, I asked several Inklings what they thought of the
                          "Thursday Night" chapter in Carpenter's book, and they all felt that
                          while it was a fine piece of writing and very cleverly done, it
                          didn't convey what an actual Inklings meeting was like. Warnie's
                          diary entries, and Tolkien's letters, give us our best glimpse, brief
                          as those are.

                          --JDR

                          "Interior is Anterior" --Owen Barfield, UNANCESTRAL VOICE.
                        • Mike Foster
                          Yesterday, David, you wrote, I have said that as movies on their own I think they re pretty good. Today they re crappy. Disgreeing is one thing; being
                          Message 12 of 30 , Sep 6, 2007
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                            Yesterday, David, you wrote, "I have said
                            that as movies on their own I think they're pretty good."

                            Today they're "crappy."

                            Disgreeing is one thing; being disagreeable is another.

                            Cheers,
                            Mike

                            -----Original Message-----
                            From: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mythsoc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                            Of David Bratman
                            Sent: Thursday, September 06, 2007 1:51 AM
                            To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: RE: [mythsoc] Re: The Movies

                            At 11:18 PM 9/5/2007 -0500, Mike Foster wrote:

                            >Your opinions are quite clearly expressed.

                            I wish they were; then I might get replies that forwarded the
                            discussion.

                            >I must wonder, however, if the Inklings, in their spirited discussion
                            of
                            >a topic, ever referred to another's opinion as "stupid, lame-brained,
                            >irrelevant." Don't you think language like that is more quarrelsome
                            >than argumentative?

                            If they didn't, that might be because they didn't express stupid,
                            lame-brained, and irrelevant opinions; and that in turn might be because
                            they had too much sense to try to defend some crappy movie.

                            But in fact the Inklings did express themselves in very quarrelsome
                            terms.
                            To wit:

                            Tolkien: "... a most amusing and highly contentious evening, on which
                            (had
                            an outsider eavesdropped) he would have thought it a meeting of fell
                            enemies hurling deadly insults before drawing their guns."

                            Lewis: "Wrenn almost seriously expressed a strong wish to burn Williams
                            ...
                            Tolkien and I agreed afterwards that we just knew what he meant: that as
                            some people ... are eminently kickable, so Williams is eminently
                            combustible."

                            Lewis to Williams: "I've a good mind to punch your head when we next
                            meet."

                            Lewis to Barfield: "Take that grin off your ugly face."

                            Tolkien about Lewis: "Alas! His ponderous silliness is becoming a fixed
                            manner." And on another occasion: "Doesn't he know what he's talking
                            about?"

                            Warren Lewis: "To read to the Inklings was a formidable ordeal."

                            These are all from chapter 4 of Glyer's _The Company They Keep_.

                            Lastly, I must record the piquant irony of being chided for
                            quarrelsomeness
                            by someone who, quite without justification, has used equally strong
                            language to condemn my posts on Jackson (quoted in a post of mine of
                            Sept.
                            2; I don't care to repeat it again).

                            At 04:44 AM 9/6/2007 +0000, Merlin DeTardo wrote:

                            >But seriously: in 1948, Tolkien seems to have criticized Lewis' work so

                            >harshly that he later felt the need to explain himself, and to
                            >apologize: "I regret causing pain, even if and in so far as I had the
                            >right; and I am very sorry indeed still for having caused it quite
                            >excessively and unnecessarily" (Letter #113). Though it looks from the
                            >letter like the quarrel began not at an Inklings but in correspondence.
                            >
                            >Is there any more on this incident in _The Company They Keep_?

                            Not specifically, I don't think: it's not entirely clear what he's
                            talking
                            about or which book he's referring to, and Glyer's is a work of analysis
                            and connection rather than one of primary research. But there's plenty
                            of
                            material on Tolkien's criticisms of Lewis, on Lewis's of Tolkien, and on
                            everybody's of everybody else's.



                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Mike Foster
                            Typo corrected, another casualty of the Ready.FIRE!...aim nature of E-mail. ... From: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mythsoc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                            Message 13 of 30 , Sep 6, 2007
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Typo corrected, another casualty of the "Ready.FIRE!...aim" nature of
                              E-mail.

                              -----Original Message-----
                              From: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mythsoc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                              Of Mike Foster
                              Sent: Thursday, September 06, 2007 5:16 PM
                              To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: RE: [mythsoc] Re: The Movies

                              Yesterday, David, you wrote, "I have said
                              that as movies on their own I think they're pretty good."

                              Today they're "crappy."

                              Disgreeing is one thing; being disagreeable is another.

                              Cheers,
                              Mike

                              -----Original Message-----
                              From: mythsoc@yahoogroups <mailto:mythsoc%40yahoogroups.com> .com
                              [mailto:mythsoc@yahoogroups <mailto:mythsoc%40yahoogroups.com> .com] On
                              Behalf
                              Of David Bratman
                              Sent: Thursday, September 06, 2007 1:51 AM
                              To: mythsoc@yahoogroups <mailto:mythsoc%40yahoogroups.com> .com
                              Subject: RE: [mythsoc] Re: The Movies

                              At 11:18 PM 9/5/2007 -0500, Mike Foster wrote:

                              >Your opinions are quite clearly expressed.

                              I wish they were; then I might get replies that forwarded the
                              discussion.

                              >I must wonder, however, if the Inklings, in their spirited discussion
                              of
                              >a topic, ever referred to another's opinion as "stupid, lame-brained,
                              >irrelevant." Don't you think language like that is more quarrelsome
                              >than argumentative?

                              If they didn't, that might be because they didn't express stupid,
                              lame-brained, and irrelevant opinions; and that in turn might be because
                              they had too much sense to try to defend some crappy movie.

                              But in fact the Inklings did express themselves in very quarrelsome
                              terms.
                              To wit:

                              Tolkien: "... a most amusing and highly contentious evening, on which
                              (had
                              an outsider eavesdropped) he would have thought it a meeting of fell
                              enemies hurling deadly insults before drawing their guns."

                              Lewis: "Wrenn almost seriously expressed a strong wish to burn Williams
                              ...
                              Tolkien and I agreed afterwards that we just knew what he meant: that as
                              some people ... are eminently kickable, so Williams is eminently
                              combustible."

                              Lewis to Williams: "I've a good mind to punch your head when we next
                              meet."

                              Lewis to Barfield: "Take that grin off your ugly face."

                              Tolkien about Lewis: "Alas! His ponderous silliness is becoming a fixed
                              manner." And on another occasion: "Doesn't he know what he's talking
                              about?"

                              Warren Lewis: "To read to the Inklings was a formidable ordeal."

                              These are all from chapter 4 of Glyer's _The Company They Keep_.

                              Lastly, I must record the piquant irony of being chided for
                              quarrelsomeness
                              by someone who, quite without justification, has used equally strong
                              language to condemn my posts on Jackson (quoted in a post of mine of
                              Sept.
                              2; I don't care to repeat it again).

                              At 04:44 AM 9/6/2007 +0000, Merlin DeTardo wrote:

                              >But seriously: in 1948, Tolkien seems to have criticized Lewis' work so

                              >harshly that he later felt the need to explain himself, and to
                              >apologize: "I regret causing pain, even if and in so far as I had the
                              >right; and I am very sorry indeed still for having caused it quite
                              >excessively and unnecessarily" (Letter #113). Though it looks from the
                              >letter like the quarrel began not at an Inklings but in correspondence.
                              >
                              >Is there any more on this incident in _The Company They Keep_?

                              Not specifically, I don't think: it's not entirely clear what he's
                              talking
                              about or which book he's referring to, and Glyer's is a work of analysis
                              and connection rather than one of primary research. But there's plenty
                              of
                              material on Tolkien's criticisms of Lewis, on Lewis's of Tolkien, and on
                              everybody's of everybody else's.


                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Mike Foster
                              As Bullwinkle used to say to Rocky, This time for sure! Agreeably, Mike ... From: Mike Foster [mailto:mafoster@hughes.net] Sent: Thursday, September 06, 2007
                              Message 14 of 30 , Sep 6, 2007
                              • 0 Attachment
                                As Bullwinkle used to say to Rocky, "This time for sure!"

                                Agreeably,
                                Mike

                                -----Original Message-----
                                From: Mike Foster [mailto:mafoster@...]
                                Sent: Thursday, September 06, 2007 5:22 PM
                                To: 'mythsoc@yahoogroups.com'
                                Subject: RE: [mythsoc] Re: The Movies

                                Typo corrected, another casualty of the "Ready.FIRE!...aim" nature of
                                E-mail.

                                -----Original Message-----
                                From: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mythsoc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                                Of Mike Foster
                                Sent: Thursday, September 06, 2007 5:16 PM
                                To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: RE: [mythsoc] Re: The Movies

                                Yesterday, David, you wrote, "I have said
                                that as movies on their own I think they're pretty good."

                                Today they're "crappy."

                                Disagreeing is one thing; being disagreeable is another.

                                Cheers,
                                Mike

                                -----Original Message-----
                                From: mythsoc@yahoogroups <mailto:mythsoc%40yahoogroups.com> .com
                                [mailto:mythsoc@yahoogroups <mailto:mythsoc%40yahoogroups.com> .com] On
                                Behalf
                                Of David Bratman
                                Sent: Thursday, September 06, 2007 1:51 AM
                                To: mythsoc@yahoogroups <mailto:mythsoc%40yahoogroups.com> .com
                                Subject: RE: [mythsoc] Re: The Movies

                                At 11:18 PM 9/5/2007 -0500, Mike Foster wrote:

                                >Your opinions are quite clearly expressed.

                                I wish they were; then I might get replies that forwarded the
                                discussion.

                                >I must wonder, however, if the Inklings, in their spirited discussion
                                of
                                >a topic, ever referred to another's opinion as "stupid, lame-brained,
                                >irrelevant." Don't you think language like that is more quarrelsome
                                >than argumentative?

                                If they didn't, that might be because they didn't express stupid,
                                lame-brained, and irrelevant opinions; and that in turn might be because
                                they had too much sense to try to defend some crappy movie.

                                But in fact the Inklings did express themselves in very quarrelsome
                                terms.
                                To wit:

                                Tolkien: "... a most amusing and highly contentious evening, on which
                                (had
                                an outsider eavesdropped) he would have thought it a meeting of fell
                                enemies hurling deadly insults before drawing their guns."

                                Lewis: "Wrenn almost seriously expressed a strong wish to burn Williams
                                ...
                                Tolkien and I agreed afterwards that we just knew what he meant: that as
                                some people ... are eminently kickable, so Williams is eminently
                                combustible."

                                Lewis to Williams: "I've a good mind to punch your head when we next
                                meet."

                                Lewis to Barfield: "Take that grin off your ugly face."

                                Tolkien about Lewis: "Alas! His ponderous silliness is becoming a fixed
                                manner." And on another occasion: "Doesn't he know what he's talking
                                about?"

                                Warren Lewis: "To read to the Inklings was a formidable ordeal."

                                These are all from chapter 4 of Glyer's _The Company They Keep_.

                                Lastly, I must record the piquant irony of being chided for
                                quarrelsomeness
                                by someone who, quite without justification, has used equally strong
                                language to condemn my posts on Jackson (quoted in a post of mine of
                                Sept.
                                2; I don't care to repeat it again).

                                At 04:44 AM 9/6/2007 +0000, Merlin DeTardo wrote:

                                >But seriously: in 1948, Tolkien seems to have criticized Lewis' work so

                                >harshly that he later felt the need to explain himself, and to
                                >apologize: "I regret causing pain, even if and in so far as I had the
                                >right; and I am very sorry indeed still for having caused it quite
                                >excessively and unnecessarily" (Letter #113). Though it looks from the
                                >letter like the quarrel began not at an Inklings but in correspondence.
                                >
                                >Is there any more on this incident in _The Company They Keep_?

                                Not specifically, I don't think: it's not entirely clear what he's
                                talking
                                about or which book he's referring to, and Glyer's is a work of analysis
                                and connection rather than one of primary research. But there's plenty
                                of
                                material on Tolkien's criticisms of Lewis, on Lewis's of Tolkien, and on
                                everybody's of everybody else's.


                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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