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Re: [mythsoc] Pan's Labyrinth

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  • David Bratman
    All you friends and foes of Pan s Labyrinth may be interested to learn that it was presented with the Hugo Award for Best SF or Fantasy Dramatic Presentation
    Message 1 of 66 , Sep 2 5:57 AM
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      All you friends and foes of Pan's Labyrinth may be interested to learn that
      it was presented with the Hugo Award for Best SF or Fantasy Dramatic
      Presentation (Long Form) a couple days ago.

      The other finalists were all book adaptations, and could form a course in
      different ways of doing it:

      A Scanner Darkly: a brilliant and pitch-perfect adaptation of a very dark
      and difficult novel. Hardly anyone saw it (I rushed to it the day it
      opened, but that's me), but it was never a novel designed to be popular, so
      filming it ws itself an act of bravery.

      The Prestige: how to badly adapt a good novel by poking giant holes in the
      plot big enough to drive a truck through (in one case, literally so). The
      most irritating movie I saw last year.

      V for Vendetta: mostly it stays with too much witless exact fidelity to the
      original, draining it of life and character; sometimes it veers away,
      always pointlessly.

      Children of Men: I've neither read the book nor seen the movie. The book
      got very bad reviews in the SF field (as the work of a non-genre author who
      had no idea she was regurgitating an old hack plot), but the movie seemed
      to be better received without any indication that it had changed the story
      significantly. Does that mean that we expect our films to regurgitate old
      hack plots?
    • Mike Foster
      In the cool light of day the morning after viewing this, Jo and I discovered that, while the movie was certainly wonderfully done, it was a bit off-putting for
      Message 66 of 66 , Sep 7 9:53 AM
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        In the cool light of day the morning after viewing this, Jo and I
        discovered that, while the movie was certainly wonderfully done, it was
        a bit off-putting for the reasons Pat and Carl noted below-though, as
        noted before, the girl's fate was something I would much rather not have
        known in advance.

        As Jo said, "It's fine that good finally overcame evil, but did there
        have to be so much evil?" The ending, where the girl's death amounts to
        the saving of her brother and her final glimpse of a beatific heavenly
        vision with a God the Father (as well as David Crosby) lookalike seems
        to be an obvious Christian parallel.

        In reviewing this thread, especially the business with the grapes, it
        seems fitting to cite Chesterton's "The Ethics Of Elfland" and his
        Doctrine of Conditional Joy, where all good and evil hang on a random
        choice to do or not to do a simple deed: Eve's apple, Pandora's box.
        Tolkien mentions this in "On Fairy Stories." It certainly looms in the
        amplification of the power of the Ring from -The Hobbit- to -The Lord of
        the Rings-, where what had been a handy little talisman for Bilbo
        becomes life or death for Frodo. That's why Jackson's plot change from
        Faramir refusing to take the Ring from Frodo to the muddled digression
        to Osgiliath is one of the more egregious offenses in the screenplay.

        Mike

        -----Original Message-----
        From: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mythsoc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
        Of Carl F. Hostetter
        Sent: Wednesday, August 22, 2007 8:48 AM
        To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Pan's Labyrinth


        On Aug 22, 2007, at 8:22 AM, Patrick H. Wynne wrote:
        > watching a helpless adolescent girl (probably delusional)
        > being physically and psychologically abused for two hours, then shot
        > dead, is NOT my idea of a good time!
        >

        Boy howdy.

        > Am I the only one who absolutely loathed this film?
        >

        No, you are not.
        >



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