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RE: [mythsoc] Re: "fantasy" films?

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  • Oberhelman, D
    Jackson s filmmaking abilities are much better suited to King Kong, though he and Boyens once again took one of the rather self-assured heroic male leading
    Message 1 of 66 , Aug 29 3:29 AM
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      Jackson's filmmaking abilities are much better suited to King Kong, though he and Boyens once again took one of the rather self-assured heroic male leading characters from the '33 film (Jack Driscoll) and turned him into the self-doubting, angst-ridden Adrian Brody character.

      Jackson originally wanted to do King Kong in the '90s, but switched to Lord of the Rings after the studio, worried about the poor performance of the 1998 Godzilla remake, killed the project. Imagine what would have happened if Godzilla had been a hit!

      David O.



      -----Original Message-----
      From: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Jonathan
      Sent: Tue 8/28/2007 10:34 PM
      To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Re: "fantasy" films?

      I like both the 1933 Kong, and the 05 Kong; both way better than the travesty that was made in 1976...
      Jonathan Michael Reiter
      jmr




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    • Mike Foster
      In the cool light of day the morning after viewing this, Jo and I discovered that, while the movie was certainly wonderfully done, it was a bit off-putting for
      Message 66 of 66 , Sep 7, 2007
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        In the cool light of day the morning after viewing this, Jo and I
        discovered that, while the movie was certainly wonderfully done, it was
        a bit off-putting for the reasons Pat and Carl noted below-though, as
        noted before, the girl's fate was something I would much rather not have
        known in advance.

        As Jo said, "It's fine that good finally overcame evil, but did there
        have to be so much evil?" The ending, where the girl's death amounts to
        the saving of her brother and her final glimpse of a beatific heavenly
        vision with a God the Father (as well as David Crosby) lookalike seems
        to be an obvious Christian parallel.

        In reviewing this thread, especially the business with the grapes, it
        seems fitting to cite Chesterton's "The Ethics Of Elfland" and his
        Doctrine of Conditional Joy, where all good and evil hang on a random
        choice to do or not to do a simple deed: Eve's apple, Pandora's box.
        Tolkien mentions this in "On Fairy Stories." It certainly looms in the
        amplification of the power of the Ring from -The Hobbit- to -The Lord of
        the Rings-, where what had been a handy little talisman for Bilbo
        becomes life or death for Frodo. That's why Jackson's plot change from
        Faramir refusing to take the Ring from Frodo to the muddled digression
        to Osgiliath is one of the more egregious offenses in the screenplay.

        Mike

        -----Original Message-----
        From: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mythsoc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
        Of Carl F. Hostetter
        Sent: Wednesday, August 22, 2007 8:48 AM
        To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Pan's Labyrinth


        On Aug 22, 2007, at 8:22 AM, Patrick H. Wynne wrote:
        > watching a helpless adolescent girl (probably delusional)
        > being physically and psychologically abused for two hours, then shot
        > dead, is NOT my idea of a good time!
        >

        Boy howdy.

        > Am I the only one who absolutely loathed this film?
        >

        No, you are not.
        >



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