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Re: Color-timing

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  • Lynn Maudlin
    In traditional film, the color timing is part of the photographic reproduction process to correct color appearance and give consistency (problems range from
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 28, 2007
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      In traditional film, the color timing is part of the photographic
      reproduction process to correct color appearance and give consistency
      (problems range from using different film stock to exposure errors,
      etc.). Now days it's not a chemical process anymore (it used to
      literally be done in big chemical baths) but a digital process and
      Jackson used it *extensively*.

      I found the films oppressively "blue" - I don't know if that makes any
      sense to anybody else, but even Rivendell went blue (about the only
      thing that didn't go blue in the first film was Hobbiton itself). It
      didn't seem quite so egregious in the last two films, possibly because
      the tone is darker, overall - but he just sucked all the yellow and a
      lot of the red out of the movie... *whimper*
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_grading

      -- Lynn --

      --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, David Emerson <emerdavid@...> wrote:
      >
      > >From: Lynn Maudlin <lynnmaudlin@...>
      > >
      > >... For instance, I would enjoy Jackson's LotR films much more
      > >if 1) he'd color-timed them differently ...
      >
      > This must be a film term I'm not familiar with. What is
      color-timing, and how was Jackson's use of it wrong?
      >
      > emerdavid
      >
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