Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Burton Raffel's Beowulf

Expand Messages
  • Jason Fisher
    ... Ah yes, the ol Burton Raffel. This was the first Beowulf I read, back when I was in junior high school (and long before I could read the original). I had
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 28, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      > Burton Raffel [...] also translated Beowulf.

      Ah yes, the ol' Burton Raffel. This was the first Beowulf I read, back when I was in junior high school (and long before I could read the original). I had a cheap paperback with Beowulf fighting the Dragon on the cover (also, long since wandered off). There's a picture of that cover and some samples of Raffel's translation here: http://www.beowulftranslations.net/raff.shtml. This site also has samples of some of the other translations folks have been talking about (e.g., Morris, Liuzza, Heaney, et al.).

      Jason

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • John D Rateliff
      ... Thanks for letting me know about this site, which I expect to find quite useful. It s great fun comparing some of the more egregious efforts, but it ll
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 31, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        On Aug 28, 2007, at 6:49 AM, Jason Fisher wrote:
        > samples of Raffel's translation here: http://
        > www.beowulftranslations.net/raff.shtml. This site also has samples
        > of some of the other translations folks have been talking about
        > (e.g., Morris, Liuzza, Heaney, et al.).

        Thanks for letting me know about this site, which I expect to find
        quite useful. It's great fun comparing some of the more egregious
        efforts, but it'll obviously be useful down the line for more serious
        work.


        On Aug 27, 2007, at 3:24 PM, lakowskir wrote:
        > There are also bilingual texts of both poems to be found in
        > "The Keys of Middle Earth: Discovering Medieval Literature
        > Through the Fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien" by Stuart D. Lee
        > and Elizabeth Solopova (Palgrave, 2005).

        I'd overlooked these; thanks for the reminder. Prose translations of
        both appear in THE TOLKIEN FAN'S MEDIEVAL READER as well, though I
        suspect the translations in that book were chosen more for their out-
        of-copyright status than any individual excellence.

        > I am thinking of brushing up my Old English grammar and want to use
        > something a bit more accessible than Sweet, Mitchell or Campbell.
        > I saw a new work entitled "An Introduction to Old English" by
        > Peter S. Baker (Blackwell, 2003). It has favourable reviews on
        > Amazon.com, and supposedly includes links to online resources.
        > Has anyone actually used it? And what was your impression?

        I haven't seen this, but if it turns out to be a good teaching guide
        please let us know by posting your experience with the book.



        On Aug 27, 2007, at 3:09 PM, Merlin DeTardo wrote:
        > ---John D Rateliff <sacnoth@...> wrote:
        >> . . . I was struck to discover that Morris uses the
        >> phrase "the lord of the rings" at one point [in his translation of
        >> BEOWULF]
        >
        > Now that is interesting. I've seen earlier suggestions that Tolkien
        > may have been inspired by "hringa thengel" and "hringa fengel" from
        > _Beowulf_, which translate loosely as "lord of the rings" [1] but
        > never a mention of the phrase in Morris's version (which I've
        > obviously not read). Thanks for that!

        You're welcome; I was tickled when I discovered it myself. Naturally,
        it found its way into my book, as part of the section of BEOWULF's
        influence on THE HOBBIT.

        --JDR
      • Jason Fisher
        ... My pleasure. Glad you found it worthwhile. It s amazing how much is out there, if only you can *find* it. :) Jason [Non-text portions of this message have
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 31, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          On August 31, 2007 1:40:42 PM, John D Rateliff wrote:
          > Thanks for letting me know about this site, which I expect to find
          > quite useful. It's great fun comparing some of the more egregious
          > efforts, but it'll obviously be useful down the line for more serious
          > work.

          My pleasure. Glad you found it worthwhile. It's amazing how much is out there, if only you can *find* it. :)

          Jason

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.