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Re: [mythsoc] Harry Potter

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  • Margaret Dean
    ... Hah! Now we know who s =really= behind those superstores, don t we? ;) ... I have to agree with Diane on this one -- I had a similar experience with that
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 12, 2000
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      Diane Joy Baker wrote:
      >

      > From: <Stolzi@...>

      > > >From another list I'm on:
      > >
      > > << Voldemort >>
      > >
      > > <<Everytime I see this word in all these posts, my mind wants to read
      > > "Wal-Mart."
      > >
      > > <<Now, how I can be serious about a book where a villain is named
      > > "Wal-Mart"?>>

      Hah! Now we know who's =really= behind those superstores, don't
      we? ;)

      > How about a wizardly hero named "Alanon" (which is why I threw *The Sword of
      > Shanara* across the room about ten pages in and never picked it up again.
      > This was sometime in the seventies---I doubt I'd make it through the ten
      > pages now.)

      I have to agree with Diane on this one -- I had a similar
      experience with that name, though I found plenty of =other=
      reasons to throw "The Sword of Sha-na-na" across the room the one
      time I read it.


      --Margaret Dean
      <margdean@...>
    • Paul F. Labaki
      I feel compelled to say a word in Brooks defense. As derivatives go, The Sword of Shannara is pretty much on par with Pat Murphy s There and Back Again.
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 12, 2000
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        I feel compelled to say a word in Brooks' defense. As derivatives go, "The
        Sword of Shannara" is pretty much on par with Pat Murphy's "There and Back
        Again." No better than a parody. Yet, I think its obvious that he had fun
        writing it. What better reason to write? He was learning his task and
        enjoying the process of practising, exercising, trying things on for size.

        I've only read it at the time it was first published and I can't remember
        the details, but I remember being convinced while reading the "The
        Elfsotones of Shannara" that he had created something containing the wonder
        that is fairie. I remember the most potent image as a tree. I also
        remember that it made me feel good. I enjoyed it. At times it made me feel
        that I was in another world so that no suspension of disbelief was required.
        I guess this one might demand another reading.

        The rest of his stuff is just candy, but I recall "Elfstones" as being
        original and inventive in some of its magic. I enjoyed it and was glad to
        have read it just for the fun of it. What better reason to read?

        Peace,
        Paul Labaki

        currently reading "The Book on the Bookshelf" by Henry Petrosky

        > From: Margaret Dean <margdean@...>
        > Reply-To: mythsoc@egroups.com
        > Date: Wed, 12 Jul 2000 10:02:38 -0400
        > To: mythsoc@egroups.com
        > Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Harry Potter
        >
        > Diane Joy Baker wrote:
        >
        >> How about a wizardly hero named "Alanon" (which is why I threw *The Sword of
        >> Shanara* across the room about ten pages in and never picked it up again.
        >> This was sometime in the seventies---I doubt I'd make it through the ten
        >> pages now.)
        >
        > I have to agree with Diane on this one -- I had a similar
        > experience with that name, though I found plenty of =other=
        > reasons to throw "The Sword of Sha-na-na" across the room the one
        > time I read it.
        >
        >
        > --Margaret Dean
        > <margdean@...>
        >
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
        > BTW: Did you buy that new car yet?
        > If not, check this site out.
        > They're called CarsDirect.com and it's a pretty sweet way to buy a car.
        > http://click.egroups.com/1/6847/8/_/505012/_/963414332/
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
        >
        > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
        >
      • LSolarion@aol.com
        In a message dated 07/12/2000 8:07:44 AM Pacific Daylight Time, margdean@erols.com writes:
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 15, 2000
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          In a message dated 07/12/2000 8:07:44 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
          margdean@... writes:

          <<
          I have to agree with Diane on this one -- I had a similar
          experience with that name, though I found plenty of =other=
          reasons to throw "The Sword of Sha-na-na" across the room the one
          time I read it. >>

          Me too. Cheap Tolkien rip-off. In fact, I have yet to be able to slog through
          any of Brooks' books. I had a similar name problem with the Demon King
          trilogy (was that the one? I'm all kerfloogled this evening) ("Kerfloogled"
          rhymes with "kerfloogled" and is a Susanism meaning, well, kerfloogled).
          Anyway, the author had cribbed a bunch of names from a dictionary of Italian
          painters or something; a character named "Damastes Cimabue" would go to the
          town of "Tiepolo", very distracting. If any of you write fantasies, please
          please make up your own names. Some readers actually have heard of Cimabue
          and Tiepolo, and seen their paintings. Makes the suspension of disbelief a
          lot less willing on my part.
        • Stolzi@aol.com
          ... I remember Coltrane as the self-destructive British psychologist in the UK version of Cracker. The looks are indeed just right, and the thread of
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 14, 2000
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            I have this unconfirmed report:

            >I just read that Snape will be played by Alan Rickman.
            >Richard Harris will be Dumbledore.
            >Robbie Coltrane will be Hagrid!
            >Coltrane, in my opinion, was born to play Hagrid - the looks, the voice...
            >People may have seen him as the sea-going ogre in "Time Bandits" and as the
            >ghost of Christmas past in the Black Adder version of the "Christmas
            >Carol."

            I remember Coltrane as the self-destructive British psychologist in the UK
            version of "Cracker." The looks are indeed just right, and the thread of
            violence; if he can add the shamefaced charm which makes Hagrid so delightful
            to his fans...

            Here's a site full of wishes, dreams and rumors (inc. Maggie Smith for
            McGonagall - sounds good to me, though she's rangier than my rather petite
            vision of McGonagall) <A HREF="http://filmforce.ign.com/news/1239.html">IGN
            FilmForce - Your Daily Dose of Muggle Studies - Harry Potter</A>

            About the hype for Harry, I'm not sure I agree with Ted that Vol V will be
            the biggest yet. There may be something in it that turns the kids off, the
            fad may have subsided, there may be another fad going... Vol V could be a
            bust. We'll see.

            Mary S
          • Sophie Masson
            What is the favourite HP book of listmembers? Our family here(mother, father, two sons)all agree on Vol III, The Prisoner of Azkaban. We liked Vol IV a lot,
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 14, 2000
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              What is the favourite HP book of listmembers? Our family here(mother,
              father, two sons)all agree on Vol III, The Prisoner of Azkaban. We liked Vol
              IV a lot, but perhaps because it's pivotal to the series, it is not as
              complete and as artistically satisfying as III, which saw JK, I think,
              really hit her stride.
              Incidentally, there's an article on HP from a very anti point of view at a
              mag called The New American which seems rather rightwing to me--but then,
              I'm not american, so I don't know how people in the US think about it. A
              friend who surfs the web a lot told me about it. It is exactly exemplary of
              the kind of Puritan objections to HP that make me cross. I just can't help
              remembering Chesterton's words about such misreading of fantasy as
              occultism, in his lovely article on Midsummer Night's Dream: the puritans
              simply could not believe in cheerful supernaturalism!
              Sophie
              Author site:
              http://members.xoom.com/sophiecastel/default.htm

              -----Original Message-----
              From: Stolzi@... <Stolzi@...>
              To: mythsoc@egroups.com <mythsoc@egroups.com>
              Date: Tuesday, 15 August 2000 13:13
              Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Harry Potter


              >I have this unconfirmed report:
              >
              >>I just read that Snape will be played by Alan Rickman.
              >>Richard Harris will be Dumbledore.
              >>Robbie Coltrane will be Hagrid!
              >>Coltrane, in my opinion, was born to play Hagrid - the looks, the voice...
              >>People may have seen him as the sea-going ogre in "Time Bandits" and as
              the
              >>ghost of Christmas past in the Black Adder version of the "Christmas
              >>Carol."
              >
              >I remember Coltrane as the self-destructive British psychologist in the UK
              >version of "Cracker." The looks are indeed just right, and the thread of
              >violence; if he can add the shamefaced charm which makes Hagrid so
              delightful
              >to his fans...
              >
              >Here's a site full of wishes, dreams and rumors (inc. Maggie Smith for
              >McGonagall - sounds good to me, though she's rangier than my rather petite
              >vision of McGonagall) <A
              HREF="http://filmforce.ign.com/news/1239.html">IGN
              >FilmForce - Your Daily Dose of Muggle Studies - Harry Potter</A>
              >
              >About the hype for Harry, I'm not sure I agree with Ted that Vol V will be
              >the biggest yet. There may be something in it that turns the kids off, the
              >fad may have subsided, there may be another fad going... Vol V could be a
              >bust. We'll see.
              >
              >Mary S
              >
              >
              >
              >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
              >
            • Margaret Dean
              ... That s my favorite too, and I tend to think my husband and (at least) older son agree with that. Of course, my preferences are somewhat skewed by a
              Message 6 of 6 , Aug 15, 2000
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                --- In mythsoc@egroups.com, "Sophie Masson" <smasson@n...> wrote:

                > What is the favourite HP book of listmembers? Our family here
                > (mother, father, two sons)all agree on Vol III, The Prisoner of
                > Azkaban.

                That's my favorite too, and I tend to think my husband and (at least)
                older son agree with that. Of course, my preferences are somewhat
                skewed by a schoolgirl crush on Professor Lupin, (:>) but I agree
                with your points, too.

                (One of the reasons I did =not= like Book 2 as well as the others was
                that Guilderoy Wassisname got on my nerves so VERY badly.)


                --Margaret Dean
                <margdean@...>
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