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Stardust

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  • dbltall42
    Has anyone seen Stardust? What did you think? I thought it a very good adaptation. I love the novel, but I can see that the changes that were made were I think
    Message 1 of 11 , Aug 17 9:14 AM
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      Has anyone seen Stardust?
      What did you think?

      I thought it a very good adaptation. I love the novel, but I can see
      that the changes that were made were I think necessary for the film
      version to work. Watching a movie in the theatre is a different
      experience than reading a book alone. The ending of the book is
      perfect, and I have always loved it, but I don't think that would have
      worked as an ending on film. Of course in this case the author is
      still around to be consulted, which wasn't the case for Beowulf;)

      The casting was excellent IMHO, and it was interesting to see Robert
      DeNiro play broad comedy. They kept the look of the Vess illustrations
      too, which was nice.

      Mariette
    • Lisa (and Ray)
      Hi Mariette! I just found this list, and thought I would say I really loved the movie! I really like Neil Gaiman though and have for a few years :-) After
      Message 2 of 11 , Aug 18 3:48 PM
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        Hi Mariette! I just found this list, and thought I would say I really
        loved the movie! I really like Neil Gaiman though and have for a few
        years :-) After reading more posts here to get a good feel for this
        group, I hope to post a worthy intro!

        Calantirniel

        --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, "dbltall42" <dbltall@...> wrote:
        >
        > Has anyone seen Stardust?
        > What did you think?
        >
        > I thought it a very good adaptation. I love the novel, but I can see
        > that the changes that were made were I think necessary for the film
        > version to work. Watching a movie in the theatre is a different
        > experience than reading a book alone. The ending of the book is
        > perfect, and I have always loved it, but I don't think that would have
        > worked as an ending on film. Of course in this case the author is
        > still around to be consulted, which wasn't the case for Beowulf;)
        >
        > The casting was excellent IMHO, and it was interesting to see Robert
        > DeNiro play broad comedy. They kept the look of the Vess illustrations
        > too, which was nice.
        >
        > Mariette
        >
      • Walkermonk@aol.com
        In that he has won at least two of our awards and has been nominated for more and that his works are becoming part of a number of papers presented at MythCon,
        Message 3 of 11 , Aug 20 7:46 PM
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          In that he has won at least two of our awards and has been nominated for
          more and that his works are becoming part of a number of papers presented at
          MythCon, I think it's safe to say that a number of us like Neil Gaiman too. :-)
          Welcome!

          Grace Walker Monk


          In a message dated 8/20/2007 8:22:05 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
          aartiana@... writes:

          Hi Mariette! I just found this list, and thought I would say I really
          loved the movie! I really like Neil Gaiman though and have for a few
          years :-) After reading more posts here to get a good feel for this
          group, I hope to post a worthy intro!

          Calantirniel







          ************************************** Get a sneak peek of the all-new AOL at
          http://discover.aol.com/memed/aolcom30tour


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Andrew Higgins
          Grace I though Neverwhere and American Gods were excellent (Star Dust is on my list) and I am - slowly - working my way through the BBC TV version of
          Message 4 of 11 , Aug 21 3:33 AM
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            Grace

            I though Neverwhere and American Gods were excellent (Star Dust is on my list) and I am - slowly - working my way through the BBC TV version of Neverwhere. Having Neil Gaiman write the screenplay is one of the things that are keeping me interested in the Beowulf movie (that and planning to reread the Grendal Mom's section in Old English to see if one can rationalize her being played by Angelina Jolie!!!).

            Thanks, Andy


            "Alles ist nach seiner Art, an ihr wirst du nichts andern." Siegfried Act 2
            http://wotanselvishmusings.blogspot.com
            http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=833145056



            ----- Original Message ----
            From: "Walkermonk@..." <Walkermonk@...>
            To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tuesday, 21 August, 2007 3:46:27 AM
            Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Re: Stardust


            In that he has won at least two of our awards and has been nominated for
            more and that his works are becoming part of a number of papers presented at
            MythCon, I think it's safe to say that a number of us like Neil Gaiman too. :-)
            Welcome!

            Grace Walker Monk


            In a message dated 8/20/2007 8:22:05 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
            aartiana@yahoo. com writes:

            Hi Mariette! I just found this list, and thought I would say I really
            loved the movie! I really like Neil Gaiman though and have for a few
            years :-) After reading more posts here to get a good feel for this
            group, I hope to post a worthy intro!

            Calantirniel

            ************ ********* ********* ******** Get a sneak peek of the all-new AOL at
            http://discover. aol.com/memed/ aolcom30tour

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





            ___________________________________________________________
            Want ideas for reducing your carbon footprint? Visit Yahoo! For Good http://uk.promotions.yahoo.com/forgood/environment.html

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • David Emerson
            ... _Anansi Boys_, the follow-up (not exactly sequel) to _American Gods_, is also well worth the read. And you should definitely check out Dave McKean s film
            Message 5 of 11 , Aug 21 8:55 AM
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              >From: Andrew Higgins <asthiggins@...>
              >
              >I thought Neverwhere and American Gods were excellent (Star Dust is on my list) and I am - slowly - working my way through the BBC TV version of Neverwhere.

              _Anansi Boys_, the follow-up (not exactly sequel) to _American Gods_, is also well worth the read. And you should definitely check out Dave McKean's film _Mirrormask_, for which Gaiman wrote the screenplay. (McKean and Gaiman have been frequent collaborators over the years, and have influenced each other artistically.)

              If you're a Gaiman completist, you should know that he adapted the English translation of the original Japanese script for _Princess Mononoke_, by the wonderful Hayao Miyazaki. <glancing tangent with the "Earthsea" discussion thread>

              emerdavid

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            • John D Rateliff
              ... Don t forget his children s books THE DAY I SWAPPED MY DAD FOR TWO GOLDFISH and THE WOLVES IN THE WALLS, which I think are his best books yet. The best of
              Message 6 of 11 , Aug 21 11:19 AM
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                On Aug 21, 2007, at 3:33 AM, Andrew Higgins wrote:
                > I thought Neverwhere and American Gods were excellent (Star Dust is
                > on my list) and I am - slowly - working my way through the BBC TV
                > version of Neverwhere. Having Neil Gaiman write the screenplay is
                > one of the things that are keeping me interested in the Beowulf
                > movie (that and planning to reread the Grendal Mom's section in Old
                > English to see if one can rationalize her being played by Angelina
                > Jolie!!!).

                Don't forget his children's books THE DAY I SWAPPED MY DAD FOR TWO
                GOLDFISH and THE WOLVES IN THE WALLS, which I think are his best
                books yet. The best of his short stories are also superb. Haven't
                read CORALINE, but STARDUST is enjoyable, if lightweight; NEVERWHERE
                is a neat concept that worked better as a miniseries than a novel,
                and his more recent AMERICAN GODS and ANANSI BOYS are interesting, if
                unpleasant. If you like the work of Terry Pratchett, you shd
                definitely check out the Pratchett-Gaiman collaboration GOOD OMENS.
                The best thing about Gaiman is that you can't ever predict where
                he'll go next: he doesn't just keep writing the same book over and
                over but is always trying something new. Well, that and his massive
                talent and the quirky ways he uses it. But his masterpiece so far is
                still SANDMAN.

                --John R., who shd be seeing STARDUST later this week.
              • John D Rateliff
                P.S.: re. Gaiman, don t hold MIRRORMASK against him. The BBC NEVERWHERE gives a much better idea of what he can do with film. Here s hoping that STARDUST opens
                Message 7 of 11 , Aug 21 11:28 AM
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                  P.S.: re. Gaiman, don't hold MIRRORMASK against him. The BBC
                  NEVERWHERE gives a much better idea of what he can do with film.
                  Here's hoping that STARDUST opens the door to more film adaptations
                  of his work, or original film works by Gaiman (as opposed to more
                  Gaiman adaptations of others' works, if BEOWULF is anything to go by).

                  --JDR
                • Oberhelman, D
                  I believe CORALINE is being made into a movie, either a CG animated film or a stop-motion one like one of Tim Burton s films. I enjoy that little book and am
                  Message 8 of 11 , Aug 21 12:01 PM
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                    I believe CORALINE is being made into a movie, either a CG animated film
                    or a stop-motion one like one of Tim Burton's films. I enjoy that
                    little book and am looking forward to seeing how it plays on screen.



                    I'd also recommend Gaiman's short story collections since they provide a
                    nice overview of his different storytelling modes. FRAGILE THINGS has
                    some wonderful ones, including his AMERICAN GODS "sequel" and the
                    controversial "Problem of Susan" story.



                    David Oberhelman





                    ________________________________

                    From: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mythsoc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                    Of John D Rateliff
                    Sent: Tuesday, August 21, 2007 1:20 PM
                    To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Re: Stardust



                    On Aug 21, 2007, at 3:33 AM, Andrew Higgins wrote:
                    > I thought Neverwhere and American Gods were excellent (Star Dust is
                    > on my list) and I am - slowly - working my way through the BBC TV
                    > version of Neverwhere. Having Neil Gaiman write the screenplay is
                    > one of the things that are keeping me interested in the Beowulf
                    > movie (that and planning to reread the Grendal Mom's section in Old
                    > English to see if one can rationalize her being played by Angelina
                    > Jolie!!!).

                    Don't forget his children's books THE DAY I SWAPPED MY DAD FOR TWO
                    GOLDFISH and THE WOLVES IN THE WALLS, which I think are his best
                    books yet. The best of his short stories are also superb. Haven't
                    read CORALINE, but STARDUST is enjoyable, if lightweight; NEVERWHERE
                    is a neat concept that worked better as a miniseries than a novel,
                    and his more recent AMERICAN GODS and ANANSI BOYS are interesting, if
                    unpleasant. If you like the work of Terry Pratchett, you shd
                    definitely check out the Pratchett-Gaiman collaboration GOOD OMENS.
                    The best thing about Gaiman is that you can't ever predict where
                    he'll go next: he doesn't just keep writing the same book over and
                    over but is always trying something new. Well, that and his massive
                    talent and the quirky ways he uses it. But his masterpiece so far is
                    still SANDMAN.

                    --John R., who shd be seeing STARDUST later this week.





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Lynn Maudlin
                    David, you should ve been there when he read The Problem of Susan outloud at Mythcon in Ann Arbor!!! -- Lynn --
                    Message 9 of 11 , Aug 21 5:11 PM
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                      David, you should've been there when he read "The Problem of Susan"
                      outloud at Mythcon in Ann Arbor!!!

                      -- Lynn --

                      --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, "Oberhelman, D" <d.oberhelman@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > I believe CORALINE is being made into a movie, either a CG animated film
                      > or a stop-motion one like one of Tim Burton's films. I enjoy that
                      > little book and am looking forward to seeing how it plays on screen.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > I'd also recommend Gaiman's short story collections since they provide a
                      > nice overview of his different storytelling modes. FRAGILE THINGS has
                      > some wonderful ones, including his AMERICAN GODS "sequel" and the
                      > controversial "Problem of Susan" story.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > David Oberhelman
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > ________________________________
                      >
                      > From: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mythsoc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                      > Of John D Rateliff
                      > Sent: Tuesday, August 21, 2007 1:20 PM
                      > To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Re: Stardust
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > On Aug 21, 2007, at 3:33 AM, Andrew Higgins wrote:
                      > > I thought Neverwhere and American Gods were excellent (Star Dust is
                      > > on my list) and I am - slowly - working my way through the BBC TV
                      > > version of Neverwhere. Having Neil Gaiman write the screenplay is
                      > > one of the things that are keeping me interested in the Beowulf
                      > > movie (that and planning to reread the Grendal Mom's section in Old
                      > > English to see if one can rationalize her being played by Angelina
                      > > Jolie!!!).
                      >
                      > Don't forget his children's books THE DAY I SWAPPED MY DAD FOR TWO
                      > GOLDFISH and THE WOLVES IN THE WALLS, which I think are his best
                      > books yet. The best of his short stories are also superb. Haven't
                      > read CORALINE, but STARDUST is enjoyable, if lightweight; NEVERWHERE
                      > is a neat concept that worked better as a miniseries than a novel,
                      > and his more recent AMERICAN GODS and ANANSI BOYS are interesting, if
                      > unpleasant. If you like the work of Terry Pratchett, you shd
                      > definitely check out the Pratchett-Gaiman collaboration GOOD OMENS.
                      > The best thing about Gaiman is that you can't ever predict where
                      > he'll go next: he doesn't just keep writing the same book over and
                      > over but is always trying something new. Well, that and his massive
                      > talent and the quirky ways he uses it. But his masterpiece so far is
                      > still SANDMAN.
                      >
                      > --John R., who shd be seeing STARDUST later this week.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                    • Diane Joy Baker
                      I agree that *Sandman* is and always will be his master work. ... From: John D Rateliff To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, August 21, 2007 2:19 PM
                      Message 10 of 11 , Aug 23 8:52 AM
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                        I agree that *Sandman* is and always will be his master work.

                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: John D Rateliff
                        To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Tuesday, August 21, 2007 2:19 PM
                        Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Re: Stardust


                        On Aug 21, 2007, at 3:33 AM, Andrew Higgins wrote:
                        > I thought Neverwhere and American Gods were excellent (Star Dust is
                        > on my list) and I am - slowly - working my way through the BBC TV
                        > version of Neverwhere. Having Neil Gaiman write the screenplay is
                        > one of the things that are keeping me interested in the Beowulf
                        > movie (that and planning to reread the Grendal Mom's section in Old
                        > English to see if one can rationalize her being played by Angelina
                        > Jolie!!!).

                        Don't forget his children's books THE DAY I SWAPPED MY DAD FOR TWO
                        GOLDFISH and THE WOLVES IN THE WALLS, which I think are his best
                        books yet. The best of his short stories are also superb. Haven't
                        read CORALINE, but STARDUST is enjoyable, if lightweight; NEVERWHERE
                        is a neat concept that worked better as a miniseries than a novel,
                        and his more recent AMERICAN GODS and ANANSI BOYS are interesting, if
                        unpleasant. If you like the work of Terry Pratchett, you shd
                        definitely check out the Pratchett-Gaiman collaboration GOOD OMENS.
                        The best thing about Gaiman is that you can't ever predict where
                        he'll go next: he doesn't just keep writing the same book over and
                        over but is always trying something new. Well, that and his massive
                        talent and the quirky ways he uses it. But his masterpiece so far is
                        still SANDMAN.

                        --John R., who shd be seeing STARDUST later this week.




                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • David Emerson
                        I finally saw the film of STARDUST, and was totally delighted. I thought it was wonderful. Plus, one of the most faithful adaptations of a fantasy story that
                        Message 11 of 11 , Oct 3, 2007
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                          I finally saw the film of STARDUST, and was totally delighted. I thought it was wonderful. Plus, one of the most faithful adaptations of a fantasy story that I've seen in a long time, perhaps ever. Of course, it helps that the original is so good to begin with.

                          emerdavid

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