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Re: very silly stuff

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  • Cathy Akers-Jordan
    RTFL! Thank you, John! You are right: the Elrond bit is particularly funny. Cathy
    Message 1 of 18 , Jul 11 4:55 AM
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      RTFL! Thank you, John! You are right: the Elrond bit is particularly
      funny.

      Cathy

      --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, John D Rateliff <sacnoth@...> wrote:
      >
      > Here's something very silly I happened to come across last week:
      > Peter Jackson's 'The Lord of the RIngs' as experienced by a bunch of
      > numskulls trying to play thorough the story as if it were a typical
      > D&D adventure.
      >
      > http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?p=612
      >
      >
      > The story is still ongoing, after about a hundred and twenty
      > installments; they're currently messing around in the middle of the
      > Battle of the Pelennor Fields. The best episode of those I've seen so
      > far is the one covering Elrond's sudden appearance in Rohan, here
      > presented as a desperate attempt by the DM to fit a plot-hole caused
      > by narrator inattention:
      >
      > http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?p=1148
      >
      > So, if you like D&D jokes, enjoy. If not, or if you don't like to
      > see the Jackson films mocked, better to give this a pass.
      >
      > --John R.
      >
    • William Cloud Hicklin
      ... with an unresolved ... (or Old English?) -- ... It s definitely Sindarin. I would suggest that the etymology isn t unresolved, either, although the note
      Message 2 of 18 , Jul 11 8:09 PM
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        --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, "Merlin
        DeTardo" <emptyD@...> wrote:

        >
        > I am a bit lost. So "athelas" is Sindarin, but
        with an unresolved
        > etymology suggesting a strong element of Quenya
        (or Old English?) --
        > is that right?


        It's definitely Sindarin. I would suggest that
        the etymology isn't unresolved, either, although
        the note in question hasn't been published (except
        via Internet: my fault, but the wars were still in
        the future at the time). The plant apparently was
        not native to Middle-earth, but brought by the
        Noldor; they called it in Quenya athea > asea (see
        The Shibboleth of Feanor). In exile, the Sindarin
        name was coined: regular cognate athe- compounded
        with -las. My speculation is that Asea Aranion
        was a specifically Numenorean term, the King being
        associated with healing in that culture; the
        translation would be something like 'kingsbalm.'

        The link to Old English aethele was entirely my
        guess- but it wouldn't be the only time OE found
        its way into the Elvish tongues: see CT's note on
        Orgel in Children of Hurin, or for that matter S.
        orch (from OE orc: Tolkien expressly said this
        word was 'Rohirric,' and it plainly comes from OE
        orc-neas and not L. orcus.).
      • William Cloud Hicklin
        OMG, Dr John, that is *screamingly* funny! And I ve been that DM, too.
        Message 3 of 18 , Jul 11 8:22 PM
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          OMG, Dr John, that is *screamingly* funny! And I've
          been that DM, too.
        • Merlin DeTardo
          ... unresolved, either, although the note in question... Thanks very much for that explanation. ... tongues: see CT s note on Orgel in Children of Hurin... I
          Message 4 of 18 , Jul 15 8:21 AM
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            >>"William Cloud Hicklin" <solicitr@...> wrote:

            >>>---"Merlin DeTardo" <emptyD@> wrote:
            >>>So "athelas" is Sindarin, but with an unresolved etymology ...?

            >> It's definitely Sindarin. I would suggest that the etymology isn't
            unresolved, either, although the note in question...

            Thanks very much for that explanation.


            >>...it wouldn't be the only time OE found its way into the Elvish
            tongues: see CT's note on Orgel in Children of Hurin...

            I can't find Orgel in the list of names at the back of _The Children
            of Hurin_ -- which character is that?

            Just kidding. Do you think Christopher Tolkien is right that it
            was "too late" to change "Saeros" to "Orgol"?
          • William Cloud Hicklin
            ... right that it ... Well, look at it from the perspective of CRT s purpose in publishing CoH. He very openly intended it to serve as a bridge to The
            Message 5 of 18 , Jul 15 12:45 PM
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              --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, "Merlin
              DeTardo" <emptyD@...> wrote:

              >
              > Just kidding. Do you think Christopher Tolkien is
              right that it
              > was "too late" to change "Saeros" to "Orgol"?
              >

              Well, look at it from the perspective of CRT's
              purpose in publishing CoH. He very openly intended
              it to serve as a bridge to The Silmarillion for
              readers of The Lord of the Rings. Not direct to
              HoME! Thus in this one case consistency overrode
              what was generally his 'extreme scrupulosity' in not
              altering the Narn papers at all beyond, in effect,
              copy-editing. (He was fortunate in the fact that the
              Narn papers, to all appearances, predate the 1958-60
              writings which underly so many 'canonicity' debates).
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