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Re: [mythsoc] about dwarves and spiders in the Hobbit ...

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  • Larry Swain
    ... Though if I recall correctly spider web comes from this meaning: it is after all a spider s weaving, a kind of fabric. Larry Swain --
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 30, 2007
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      >
      >
      >
      > On Jun 25, 2007, at 6:26 AM, Anglin Turcam wrote:
      >
      > > But you also find some other interresting thing about this fact in one
      > > other book written by Pr. Tolkien :
      > >
      > > [...] His gleaming coat
      > > was made of rings of steel no shaft
      > > could pierce, a web of dwarvish craft ...
      > > Lays of Beleriand.
      > > [p.166-167]
      > >
      >
      > Tolkien here is using "web" in its original sense of 'woven
      > fabric' (it is cognate with "weave"). It is often encountered in this
      > sense in Middle English. He is not associating the coat with spider-
      > webs.

      Though if I recall correctly spider web comes from this meaning: it is after all a spider's weaving, a kind of fabric.

      Larry Swain

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    • Paul Meeter
      This reminds me of Barfield s Poetic Diction . Tolkien uses the words web and lob , well aware of their meanings both then and now; and the differences
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 1, 2007
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        This reminds me of Barfield's "Poetic Diction". Tolkien uses the words
        "web" and "lob", well aware of their meanings both then and now; and the
        differences between their meanings then and now. It's just one example of
        how Tolkien re-enriches our own meaning-fund with all that the words used to
        signify. I like the connection between 'dwarf' and 'spider' that is evident
        in Northern lore. I expect Tolkien knew of it, and perhaps meant to play
        the linguistic joke by having the one try to eat the other.

        --
        Paul Meeter


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