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Re: about dwarves and spiders in the Hobbit ...

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  • Merlin DeTardo
    ... (it is cognate with weave ). It is often encountered in this sense in Middle English. And Tolkien also uses web elsewhere in the same way, as in the
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 30, 2007
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      >>---"Carl F. Hostetter" <Aelfwine@...> wrote:
      >>Tolkien here is using "web" in its original sense of 'woven fabric'
      (it is cognate with "weave"). It is often encountered in this sense in
      Middle English.

      And Tolkien also uses "web" elsewhere in the same way, as in the
      chapter, "Minas Tirith", in _LotR_:

      "No hangings nor storied webs, nor any things of woven stuff or of
      wood, were to be seen in that long solemn hall; but between the
      pillars there stood a silent company of tall images graven in cold
      stone."
    • Larry Swain
      ... Though if I recall correctly spider web comes from this meaning: it is after all a spider s weaving, a kind of fabric. Larry Swain --
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 30, 2007
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        >
        >
        >
        > On Jun 25, 2007, at 6:26 AM, Anglin Turcam wrote:
        >
        > > But you also find some other interresting thing about this fact in one
        > > other book written by Pr. Tolkien :
        > >
        > > [...] His gleaming coat
        > > was made of rings of steel no shaft
        > > could pierce, a web of dwarvish craft ...
        > > Lays of Beleriand.
        > > [p.166-167]
        > >
        >
        > Tolkien here is using "web" in its original sense of 'woven
        > fabric' (it is cognate with "weave"). It is often encountered in this
        > sense in Middle English. He is not associating the coat with spider-
        > webs.

        Though if I recall correctly spider web comes from this meaning: it is after all a spider's weaving, a kind of fabric.

        Larry Swain

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      • Paul Meeter
        This reminds me of Barfield s Poetic Diction . Tolkien uses the words web and lob , well aware of their meanings both then and now; and the differences
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 1, 2007
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          This reminds me of Barfield's "Poetic Diction". Tolkien uses the words
          "web" and "lob", well aware of their meanings both then and now; and the
          differences between their meanings then and now. It's just one example of
          how Tolkien re-enriches our own meaning-fund with all that the words used to
          signify. I like the connection between 'dwarf' and 'spider' that is evident
          in Northern lore. I expect Tolkien knew of it, and perhaps meant to play
          the linguistic joke by having the one try to eat the other.

          --
          Paul Meeter


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