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The Golden Compass wins award

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  • John D Rateliff
    Just saw a piece on the BBC website that the first book in Pullman s HIS DARK MATERIALS trilogy has just been named the best children s book of the last
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 21 12:55 PM
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      Just saw a piece on the BBC website that the first book in Pullman's
      HIS DARK MATERIALS trilogy has just been named the best children's
      book of the last seventy years. It was chosen from among the other
      Carnegie Medal winners, thus beating out authors such as Arthur
      Ransome, Mary Norton (THE BORROWERS), CSL (THE LAST BATTLE), Rosemary
      Sutcliff, Alan Garner (THE OWL SERVICE), & Terry Pratchett. Pullman
      says he is "humbled and honoured" that his was chosen "from among so
      many wonderful books".

      Here's the link

      http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/1/hi/entertainment/6228124.stm

      --JDR

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    • Paul Meeter
      Hello, this is my first post, first time I ve actually thought of anything that I wanted to say. Anyway, I notice that the award is for any children s book in
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 22 6:56 PM
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        Hello, this is my first post, first time I've actually thought of anything
        that I wanted to say. Anyway, I notice that the award is for any children's
        book in the last 70 years. That would disclude The Hobbit; I wonder why?

        --
        Paul Meeter


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      • Oberhelman, D
        Welcome to the list. The books eligible for this award were limited to those that received the (British) Library Association s Carnegie Medal, and The Hobbit
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 22 7:28 PM
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          Welcome to the list. The books eligible for this award were limited to those that received the (British) Library Association's Carnegie Medal, and The Hobbit did not win that award.

          The Carnegie Medal winners are listed at

          http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/carnegie/full_list_of_winners.php





          **************************************
          David D. Oberhelman
          Associate Professor
          Humanities-Social Sciences Division
          Oklahoma State University Library
          Stillwater, OK 74078
          [SUMMER 2007 Phone: (405) 269-8657]
          Fax: (405) 744-7579
          Email: d.oberhelman@...



          -----Original Message-----
          From: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Paul Meeter
          Sent: Fri 6/22/2007 8:56 PM
          To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [mythsoc] Re:The Golden Compass wins award

          Hello, this is my first post, first time I've actually thought of anything
          that I wanted to say. Anyway, I notice that the award is for any children's
          book in the last 70 years. That would disclude The Hobbit; I wonder why?

          --
          Paul Meeter


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Merlin DeTardo
          ... received the (British) Library Association s Carnegie Medal, and The Hobbit did not win that award. So who here has read the 1937 winner, _The Family from
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 22 8:33 PM
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            >>"Oberhelman, D" <d.oberhelman@...> wrote:
            >>The books eligible for this award were limited to those that
            received the (British) Library Association's Carnegie Medal, and The
            Hobbit did not win that award.


            So who here has read the 1937 winner, _The Family from One End Street_
            by Eve Garnett? How does it compare to _The Hobbit_?

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Family_from_One_End_Street
          • lynnmaudlin
            ... See, THAT is what I love about the passage of time - we look back and say, what were we THINKING?! (or perhaps, what were THEY thinking--?! )
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 23 1:17 PM
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              --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, "Merlin DeTardo" <emptyD@...> wrote:
              >
              > So who here has read the 1937 winner, _The Family from One End Street_
              > by Eve Garnett? How does it compare to _The Hobbit_?
              >
              > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Family_from_One_End_Street
              >

              See, THAT is what I love about the passage of time - we look back and
              say, "what were we THINKING?!" (or perhaps, "what were THEY
              thinking--?!") <grin>
            • WendellWag@aol.com
              It s actually fairly easy to explain why _The Golden Compass_ won the award. Look at the list of ten finalists, which were the only ones which could be voted
              Message 6 of 6 , Jun 25 8:27 PM
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                It's actually fairly easy to explain why _The Golden Compass_ won the award.
                Look at the list of ten finalists, which were the only ones which could be
                voted on in the online poll:
                * _David Almond_ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Almond) ,
                _Skellig_ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skellig) , (1998)
                * _Melvin Burgess_ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melvin_Burgess) ,
                _Junk_ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Junk) , (1996)
                * _Kevin Crossley-Holland_
                (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kevin_Crossley-Holland) , _Storm_ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Storm) , (1985)
                * _Jennifer Donnelly_ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jennifer_Donnelly)
                , _A Gathering Light_ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Gathering_Light) ,
                (2003)
                * _Alan Garner_ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Garner) , _The Owl
                Service_ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Owl_Service) , (1967)
                * _Eve Garnett_ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eve_Garnett) , _The
                Family From One End Street_
                (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=The_Family_From_One_End_Street&action=edit) , (1937)
                * _Mary Norton_ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Norton) , _The
                Borrowers_ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Borrowers) , (1952)
                * _Philippa Pearce_ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippa_Pearce) ,
                _Tom's Midnight Garden_ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom's_Midnight_Garden) ,
                (1958)
                * _Philip Pullman_ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Pullman) ,
                _Northern Lights_ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_Lights) , (1995)
                * _Robert Westall_ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Westall) , _The
                Machine-Gunners_
                (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=The_Machine-Gunners&action=edit) , (1981)
                See the Wikipedia entry:

                _http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnegie_Medal_
                (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnegie_Medal)

                Consider how many good books were eliminated even from consideration. It
                appears to me that only books originally published in the U.K. are even
                eligible for the Carnegie Medal. Certainly all the ones that have won that I
                recognize are British books. Then consider that a book that didn't win the
                Carnegie in the year that it was eligible can't even be consider for this award,
                even though there are a lot of good books that only became well known several
                years after publication. Then a committee chose the ten books above as
                finalists. This is a weird list. I think I know children's books reasonably well,
                but I had only heard of four of the ten books before starting to read this
                thread. It's hardly surprising then that many online voters looked at the list
                of ten books and said, "Gee, the only book I've read is the Pullman one, so
                I'll vote for it." As far as I'm concerned, this is truly a worthless poll
                that proves absolutely nothing.

                Wendell Wagner



                ************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com


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