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Tolkien Calendars

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  • Jason Fisher
    ... Wendell, yes, I d say $146 is absurdly high, even today. The Calendars from the 1970 s come up all the time on eBay, and there s a good deal of variability
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 20, 2007
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      > At the Society auction at the 1987 Mythcon, there was a bidding war for one
      > of the 1970's Tolkien calendars. (I don't remember anymore precisely which
      > one. Does anyone here remember?) It went for, if I remember correctly, $146.
      > I thought that it was probably absurdly high for the item. I think that
      > the same sort of calendar went for just $45 a few years later, and I thought
      > that was a more likely price. I wonder what Tolkien calendars are selling for
      > these days.

      Wendell, yes, I'd say $146 is absurdly high, even today. The Calendars from the 1970's come up all the time on eBay, and there's a good deal of variability in the prices, but they seldom go that high. Recently, for instance, a 1976 as well as a 1978 *failed* to sell for a mere $15.00 (plus $7.00 for S/H). That's pretty low!

      Currently, there's a 1973 and a 1974 up for auction as we speak. Why not watch 'em yourself and see how high (or low) they go?

      http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=330134228164
      http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=300122323480

      Cheers,
      Jason Fisher

      PS. You can also find the calendars through bookfinder.com, and there they do tend to sell for much higher than through the auction process. But why anybody would pay that much when they don't have to is beyond me.
    • lynnmaudlin
      But is also needs to be remembered in 1987 terms - LONG before Ebay existed and folks thought, why am I keeping this old Tolkien calendar? I don t want it -
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 20, 2007
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        But is also needs to be remembered in 1987 terms - LONG before Ebay
        existed and folks thought, "why am I keeping this old Tolkien
        calendar? I don't want it - maybe I can get some money for it!" At
        that point it was much harder to come across these things. Plus, as we
        all know too well, a good auction stimulates bidding wars and, in the
        energy of the time and place, the fun of the moment, we go places we
        might not otherwise go...

        -- Lynn --

        --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, Jason Fisher <visualweasel@...> wrote:
        >
        > > At the Society auction at the 1987 Mythcon, there was a bidding
        war for one
        > > of the 1970's Tolkien calendars. (I don't remember anymore
        precisely which
        > > one. Does anyone here remember?) It went for, if I remember
        correctly, $146.
        > > I thought that it was probably absurdly high for the item. I think
        that
        > > the same sort of calendar went for just $45 a few years later, and
        I thought
        > > that was a more likely price. I wonder what Tolkien calendars are
        selling for
        > > these days.
        >
        > Wendell, yes, I'd say $146 is absurdly high, even today. The
        Calendars from the 1970's come up all the time on eBay, and there's a
        good deal of variability in the prices, but they seldom go that high.
        Recently, for instance, a 1976 as well as a 1978 *failed* to sell for
        a mere $15.00 (plus $7.00 for S/H). That's pretty low!
        >
        > Currently, there's a 1973 and a 1974 up for auction as we speak. Why
        not watch 'em yourself and see how high (or low) they go?
        >
        > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=330134228164
        > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=300122323480
        >
        > Cheers,
        > Jason Fisher
        >
        > PS. You can also find the calendars through bookfinder.com, and
        there they do tend to sell for much higher than through the auction
        process. But why anybody would pay that much when they don't have to
        is beyond me.
        >
      • Carl F. Hostetter
        There s also the fact that Christopher Tolkien was at this Mythcon, so the possibly of having the calendar signed by him would drive up its perceived value.
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 20, 2007
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          There's also the fact that Christopher Tolkien was at this Mythcon,
          so the possibly of having the calendar signed by him would drive up
          its perceived value.


          On Jun 20, 2007, at 3:59 PM, lynnmaudlin wrote:

          > But is also needs to be remembered in 1987 terms - LONG before Ebay
          > existed and folks thought, "why am I keeping this old Tolkien
          > calendar? I don't want it - maybe I can get some money for it!" At
          > that point it was much harder to come across these things. Plus, as we
          > all know too well, a good auction stimulates bidding wars and, in the
          > energy of the time and place, the fun of the moment, we go places we
          > might not otherwise go...
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