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Fw: GANDALF?S GARDEN LIVES ON!

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  • Edith.Crowe@sjsu.edu
    For the collectors among you, a heads-up from The Tolkien Society. Corresponding Secretary of the Mythopoeic Society (http://www.mythsoc.org) ... janet alvarez
    Message 1 of 10 , Jun 18, 2007
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      For the collectors among you, a heads-up from The Tolkien Society.

      Corresponding Secretary of the Mythopoeic Society (http://www.mythsoc.org)
      ----- Forwarded by Edith Crowe/SJSU on 06/18/2007 09:00 AM -----

      janet alvarez <humbuckinhoney@...>
      06/17/2007 01:57 PM

      To
      edith crowe <edith.crowe@...>
      cc

      Subject
      Fwd: GANDALF?S GARDEN LIVES ON!






      Dear Edith, I thought this might be of interest to you and the other
      MythSoc folks!

      jan

      Muz Murray <igd@...> wrote:
      From: "Muz Murray" <igd@...>
      To: <humbuckinhoney@...>
      Subject: GANDALF?S GARDEN LIVES ON!
      Date: Sat, 16 Jun 2007 11:39:53 +0100

      GANDALF?S GARDEN LIVES ON!
      Gandalf?s Garden mystical scene magazine is still fondly remembered in
      many a heart and mind today. It flourished in the rougher end of the
      King?s Road, London, during the fabulous ?Flower-Power? years from
      1968?1972. The vision of its creator and editor Muz Murray was to produce
      an antidote to the anarchistic and nihilistic hedonism of the Underground
      journals of the ?Swinging Sixties.?
      The Gardenscene and Shoppe became a guiding beacon of light and
      inspiration for thousands of spiritually lonely people all over the
      planet. Somehow, without advertising, it reached out across the world to
      all those in need of its message of hope, way before the advent of the
      world-connecting Internet. The vision of this small community, based in a
      tiny Notting Hill Gate bed-sit, inspired dozens of other similar ventures
      and communities all over Europe and Scandinavia, with names like Merlyn?s
      Garden and Middle Earth, etc.
      Nowadays, in the book trade of Sixties Memorabilia, rare copies of the
      only six issues ever produced have become highly prized (and highly
      priced) collectables, ranging from around £50 to over £100 each!
      For those who cannot afford such largesse and still have holes in their
      Gandalf?s Garden collections, we are now delighted to announce the advent
      of ?The Complete Gandalf?s Garden? on CD!
      Every page of all six issues of Gandalf?s Garden magazine are here
      reproduced, together with impressions of Gandalf?s Garden from the books
      of contemporary writers, plus tributes from readers, Newspaper articles,
      Reminiscences by the ?Gardeners,? archival photos of the Gardeners and the
      Shoppe; plus a lengthy article by Muz Murray, on ?The Life and Times of
      Gandalf?s Garden.?
      If you missed out on what the Sixties were all about, here it is all
      in one package!
      Check it out in the ?Shop? section of our very ?user-friendly? website:
      www.mantra-yoga.com/goodies/gg_cd.htm
      The CD is in PDF format.
      Price: £14.99.

      ***
      You are receiving this email because you have previously purchased a
      product from mantra-yoga.com, or have attended a Workshop with Muz Murray,
      or have had correspondence with him. We do not disclose our mailing list
      to third parties.

      If you wish to be removed from our mailing list, please reply with REMOVE
      in the Subject Line.
      ***




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • lynnmaudlin
      Thanks, Edith. You know, the other weird thing is that our little comedic 1990 NOT Tolkien Calendar has become a rare, prized collectible! quote: As to my
      Message 2 of 10 , Jun 19, 2007
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        Thanks, Edith.

        You know, the other weird thing is that our little comedic "1990 NOT
        Tolkien Calendar" has become a rare, prized collectible!

        quote:
        "As to my favorites, my top 5 list would have to include:

        1. The 1974 A&U signed by Professor Tolkien (more precious than ANY
        ring to me!)
        2. The 1998 Khandlendar done by Alex Lewis (yes, THE Alex Lewis). It
        is a hoot-and-a-half!
        3. The 1990 NOT Tolkien Calendar (Mythopoeic Society). It is a hoot!
        4. The 1969 illustrated by Tim Kirk because it is the first one ever
        and because Tim Kirk sent a copy of it to me (very cool!)
        5. The 1973 Ballantine because it's the first of the commercially
        published calendars. I have a mint (unopened in its mailer that looks
        like it could be on a store shelf today) copy of it. I have two copies
        of most of the commercially published calendars: one mint (unopened
        mailer or still shrinkwrapped) and one for "reading".

        ... http://www.angelfire.com/tn3/tolkiencalendars/1989_1992.html ..."

        we're about a quarter of the way down his page (this completist,
        collecting Tolkien Calendars)... I think we should do another... <evil
        grin>

        -- Lynn --

        --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, Edith.Crowe@... wrote:
        >
        > For the collectors among you, a heads-up from The Tolkien Society.
        >
        > Corresponding Secretary of the Mythopoeic Society
        (http://www.mythsoc.org)
        > ----- Forwarded by Edith Crowe/SJSU on 06/18/2007 09:00 AM -----
        >
        > janet alvarez <humbuckinhoney@...>
        > 06/17/2007 01:57 PM
        >
        > To
        > edith crowe <edith.crowe@...>
        > cc
        >
        > Subject
        > Fwd: GANDALF?S GARDEN LIVES ON!
        >
      • John D Rateliff
        ... Does such a thing even exist? I mean, did they print copies early enough in 1973 for Tolkien to have signed any before his death in early September? --JDR
        Message 3 of 10 , Jun 19, 2007
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          On Jun 19, 2007, at 12:08 PM, lynnmaudlin wrote:
          > quote:
          > "As to my favorites, my top 5 list would have to include:
          >
          > 1. The 1974 A&U signed by Professor Tolkien (more precious than ANY
          > ring to me!)

          Does such a thing even exist? I mean, did they print copies early
          enough in 1973 for Tolkien to have signed any before his death in
          early September?

          --JDR
        • Jeremy Edmonds
          The collector talks about this in this forum: http://www.tolkienguide.com/modules/newbb/viewtopic.php?topic_id=20&forum=9&post_id=95#forumpost95 It came with
          Message 4 of 10 , Jun 19, 2007
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            The collector talks about this in this forum:

            http://www.tolkienguide.com/modules/newbb/viewtopic.php?topic_id=20&forum=9&post_id=95#forumpost95

            It came with pretty good provenance.

            Jeremy


            --- John D Rateliff <sacnoth@...> wrote:

            > On Jun 19, 2007, at 12:08 PM, lynnmaudlin wrote:
            > > quote:
            > > "As to my favorites, my top 5 list would have to include:
            > >
            > > 1. The 1974 A&U signed by Professor Tolkien (more precious than ANY
            > > ring to me!)
            >
            > Does such a thing even exist? I mean, did they print copies early
            > enough in 1973 for Tolkien to have signed any before his death in
            > early September?
            >
            > --JDR
            >


            --
            Rown's Books
            * Tolkien, SF&F and more *
            872 Loyalton Drive
            Campbell, CA 95008 USA
            (408) 396-6996
            www.rowns.com
          • WendellWag@aol.com
            At the Society auction at the 1987 Mythcon, there was a bidding war for one of the 1970 s Tolkien calendars. (I don t remember anymore precisely which one.
            Message 5 of 10 , Jun 19, 2007
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              At the Society auction at the 1987 Mythcon, there was a bidding war for one
              of the 1970's Tolkien calendars. (I don't remember anymore precisely which
              one. Does anyone here remember?) It went for, if I remember correctly, $146.
              I thought that it was probably absurdly high for the item. I think that
              the same sort of calendar went for just $45 a few years later, and I thought
              that was a more likely price. I wonder what Tolkien calendars are selling for
              these days.

              Wendell Wagner



              ************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Bonnie Callahan
              From the Mythsoc Wannabe Historian: We need to archive these treasures. Where s OUR curator? I ve saved what I can since 1968, but I didn t have the funds to
              Message 6 of 10 , Jun 20, 2007
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                From the Mythsoc Wannabe Historian:

                We need to archive these treasures. Where's OUR
                curator?

                I've saved what I can since 1968, but I didn't have
                the funds to grab most of the stuff you refer to.

                I wish I had the script to OUR version of "Spamalot"
                from--I
                think--Colorado in 1996. Who Knew?

                We have had so much fun over the years. Who'd'a
                guessed ANY of it might be "collectible"?

                I invite anyone with such materials to submit it to
                us. One of us somewhere is an archivist. Maybe
                me.....?

                Best, Bonnie


                --- lynnmaudlin <lynnmaudlin@...> wrote:

                > Thanks, Edith.
                >
                > You know, the other weird thing is that our little
                > comedic "1990 NOT
                > Tolkien Calendar" has become a rare, prized
                > collectible!
                >
                > quote:
                > "As to my favorites, my top 5 list would have to
                > include:
                >
                > 1. The 1974 A&U signed by Professor Tolkien (more
                > precious than ANY
                > ring to me!)
                > 2. The 1998 Khandlendar done by Alex Lewis (yes, THE
                > Alex Lewis). It
                > is a hoot-and-a-half!
                > 3. The 1990 NOT Tolkien Calendar (Mythopoeic
                > Society). It is a hoot!
                > 4. The 1969 illustrated by Tim Kirk because it is
                > the first one ever
                > and because Tim Kirk sent a copy of it to me (very
                > cool!)
                > 5. The 1973 Ballantine because it's the first of the
                > commercially
                > published calendars. I have a mint (unopened in its
                > mailer that looks
                > like it could be on a store shelf today) copy of it.
                > I have two copies
                > of most of the commercially published calendars: one
                > mint (unopened
                > mailer or still shrinkwrapped) and one for
                > "reading".
                >
                > ...
                >
                http://www.angelfire.com/tn3/tolkiencalendars/1989_1992.html
                > ..."
                >
                > we're about a quarter of the way down his page (this
                > completist,
                > collecting Tolkien Calendars)... I think we should
                > do another... <evil
                > grin>
                >
                > -- Lynn --
                >
                > --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, Edith.Crowe@...
                > wrote:
                > >
                > > For the collectors among you, a heads-up from The
                > Tolkien Society.
                > >
                > > Corresponding Secretary of the Mythopoeic Society
                > (http://www.mythsoc.org)
                > > ----- Forwarded by Edith Crowe/SJSU on 06/18/2007
                > 09:00 AM -----
                > >
                > > janet alvarez <humbuckinhoney@...>
                > > 06/17/2007 01:57 PM
                > >
                > > To
                > > edith crowe <edith.crowe@...>
                > > cc
                > >
                > > Subject
                > > Fwd: GANDALF?S GARDEN LIVES ON!
                > >
                >
                >
                >
              • David Bratman
                ... You do. Our Spamlot was written in the giddy evenings of, as I recall, the 1989 Vancouver Mythcon. The written notes were carefully preserved and
                Message 7 of 10 , Jun 20, 2007
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                  At 02:19 AM 6/20/2007 -0700, Bonnie Callahan wrote:

                  >I wish I had the script to OUR version of "Spamalot"
                  >from--I think--Colorado in 1996. Who Knew?

                  You do. Our "Spamlot" was written in the giddy evenings of, as I recall,
                  the 1989 Vancouver Mythcon. The written notes were carefully preserved and
                  printed in Mythprint under the editorship of your present correspondent.
                  The subsequent stage performance of "Spamalot", the first I believe being
                  at the TCC in 1992, used the Mythprint text as a script, and I believe
                  later revivals did likewise.

                  I also published such other one-off Mythcon songs as "Flopsy the Nazgul"
                  and "The Periodic Table of Elvish Names."

                  In visual souvenirs, the napkin on which Tim drew "The Squeezing of the
                  Nedlog" was transferred to print with infinite care by myself & my faithful
                  managing editor, with difficulty because it was in pencil and didn't
                  reproduce well. But we published it.

                  Not Ready for Mythcon Players scripts have not, I think, been published.
                  But I can report that the original script of the first official Not Ready
                  production, "The Fall of the Tombs of Atuan" in 1988, presented to GoH
                  Ursula Le Guin after the show with a flourish, is now preserved among her
                  papers at the University of Oregon, along with her other papers from that
                  Mythcon. I came across them while researching in the papers there some
                  years ago.
                • lynnmaudlin
                  ... John, I m sure you can query the fellow about it (I did include his URL) - they may have done, or it *could* have been on a plate (maybe that s not the
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jun 20, 2007
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                    --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, John D Rateliff <sacnoth@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > On Jun 19, 2007, at 12:08 PM, lynnmaudlin wrote:
                    > > quote:
                    > > "As to my favorites, my top 5 list would have to include:
                    > >
                    > > 1. The 1974 A&U signed by Professor Tolkien (more precious than ANY
                    > > ring to me!)
                    >
                    > Does such a thing even exist? I mean, did they print copies early
                    > enough in 1973 for Tolkien to have signed any before his death in
                    > early September?

                    John, I'm sure you can query the fellow about it (I did include his
                    URL) - they may have done, or it *could* have been on a plate (maybe
                    that's not the right word - remember the Christopher Tolkien
                    signatures from 1992? that's what I mean).

                    -- Lynn --
                  • lynnmaudlin
                    oh heavens no, Spamalot was born at Vancouver in the 80s I think collectors are the ones who archive treasures (and thereby they re the ones who decide what
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jun 20, 2007
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                      oh heavens no, "Spamalot" was born at Vancouver in the '80s

                      I think collectors are the ones who archive treasures (and thereby
                      they're the ones who decide what the treasures even are). Yeah, the
                      Society had a lot of stuff that, by default, became the collection of
                      the person holding those materials.

                      An official Mythopoeic Society archivist is a delicate position, for
                      exactly that reason--

                      -- Lynn --

                      --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, Bonnie Callahan <bonolatm@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > From the Mythsoc Wannabe Historian:
                      >
                      > We need to archive these treasures. Where's OUR
                      > curator?
                      >
                      > I've saved what I can since 1968, but I didn't have
                      > the funds to grab most of the stuff you refer to.
                      >
                      > I wish I had the script to OUR version of "Spamalot"
                      > from--I
                      > think--Colorado in 1996. Who Knew?
                      >
                      > We have had so much fun over the years. Who'd'a
                      > guessed ANY of it might be "collectible"?
                      >
                      > I invite anyone with such materials to submit it to
                      > us. One of us somewhere is an archivist. Maybe
                      > me.....?
                      >
                      > Best, Bonnie
                      >
                    • lynnmaudlin
                      see, if I d just read through the thread BEFORE responding, I d discover that David B has already been there, done it better--! Yolen, Yolen, Yolen and
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jun 20, 2007
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                        see, if I'd just read through the thread BEFORE responding, I'd
                        discover that David B has already been there, done it better--!

                        "Yolen, Yolen, Yolen" and "These are a Few of My Favorite Parts" were
                        also, I believe, published in Mythprint...

                        -- Lynn --

                        --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, David Bratman <dbratman@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > At 02:19 AM 6/20/2007 -0700, Bonnie Callahan wrote:
                        >
                        > >I wish I had the script to OUR version of "Spamalot"
                        > >from--I think--Colorado in 1996. Who Knew?
                        >
                        > You do. Our "Spamlot" was written in the giddy evenings of, as I
                        recall,
                        > the 1989 Vancouver Mythcon. The written notes were carefully
                        preserved and
                        > printed in Mythprint under the editorship of your present correspondent.
                        > The subsequent stage performance of "Spamalot", the first I believe
                        being
                        > at the TCC in 1992, used the Mythprint text as a script, and I believe
                        > later revivals did likewise.
                        >
                        > I also published such other one-off Mythcon songs as "Flopsy the Nazgul"
                        > and "The Periodic Table of Elvish Names."
                        >
                        > In visual souvenirs, the napkin on which Tim drew "The Squeezing of the
                        > Nedlog" was transferred to print with infinite care by myself & my
                        faithful
                        > managing editor, with difficulty because it was in pencil and didn't
                        > reproduce well. But we published it.
                        >
                        > Not Ready for Mythcon Players scripts have not, I think, been published.
                        > But I can report that the original script of the first official Not
                        Ready
                        > production, "The Fall of the Tombs of Atuan" in 1988, presented to GoH
                        > Ursula Le Guin after the show with a flourish, is now preserved
                        among her
                        > papers at the University of Oregon, along with her other papers from
                        that
                        > Mythcon. I came across them while researching in the papers there some
                        > years ago.
                        >
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