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I think you scared me straight, Walter

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  • Jason Fisher
    To paraphrase Jerry Seinfeld (when George tells him all his deepest darkest fears and completely creeps him out): Well, good luck with all *that*. Or to
    Message 1 of 4 , May 24 7:01 AM
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      To paraphrase Jerry Seinfeld (when George tells him all his deepest darkest fears and completely creeps him out): "Well, good luck with all *that*." Or to paraphrase Ross from "Friends" (talking to Chandler, ditto), "I said 'share', not 'scare'!"

      ----- Original Message ----
      From: Walter Padgett <wpadgett@...>
      To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, May 23, 2007 9:36:20 PM
      Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Re: it's all in Tolkien

      When a competition for scarce resources ensues, doesn't each act in his own
      interest? In this case, what is good for the one is not good for the
      other. These days, at least for me sometimes, it makes some sense to
      identify with the Orcs and the Southrons under Sauron's dominion. I think
      some of Tolkiens' greatest fears about what state of evil modern society
      could come to given the advances in the ideological control of the many by
      the few through improvements in the quick and effective dissemination of
      propaganda, the design of consumerist society, the rise of powerful
      corporations, the competitive nature of capitalist democratic government,
      and other such phenomena as he warned about, have materialized. The social
      norms and economic necessities to which I am encouraged or obliged to
      conform rather discourage, deter or prevent me from thinking and acting
      according to the moral principles and sensibilities that should be guiding
      me to activism or protest. There's a lot of things that go on around me
      that aren't right, and I ought to say something or do something about it,
      but I've got to look out for my own interests, not make waves, and observe
      the seemingly all-important rule of "CYA" in this new bullshit government
      job I started last month, even if it is clear that it's a waste, or
      something important is being neglected, or someone may suffer just so we can
      get our numbers up. There's an example of the conservation of power in
      action. My creative life is sacrificed. I don't have time to think or
      write or research anything. I would like to make mention of Tom Shippey's
      article on "Tolkien as a Post-War Writer" because he talks about Tolkien
      having a different reaction to the times in which he lived-- different from
      other post-war writers such as Golding and Orwell, and he offered a message
      that was positive or hopeful or something like that, suggesting the
      evocation of "traditional" values-- but I'm driven away from making a
      decent comment here, not because I'm lazy or stupid, but because I've got to
      get to bed so I can get up and be rested for tomorrow morning. I can't work
      on it later. Timing is everything in these comments, so I've got to send it
      now, or just forget about it. It's these two values competing here, and
      which course is the one that leads to the good? I better go. I've got some
      wicked things to do for the State of Indiana tomorrow, and I need to be
      fresh for it. (What's said about Maeglin in Gondolin? . . . that he would
      shirk no toil or burden if thereby he might have power? That's me!)

      On 5/23/07, lynnmaudlin <lynnmaudlin@ yahoo.com> wrote:
      >
      > "Many" believe that many on the opposite side have taken Grima as
      > their role model?
      >
      > wow... I can't think of a single person I know who believes that, on
      > either side, so I'm not quite sure where this "many" figure comes from...?
      >
      > -- Lynn --
      >
      > --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups .com <mythsoc%40yahoogro ups.com>, "ebadams2000"
      > <ebadams2000@ ...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Justified or not, many (but not all) of those on one side of the
      > > debates regarding our own current "Orc Wars" believe that many on the
      > > opposite side have taken Grima as their role model.
      > >
      >
      >
      >

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Walter Padgett
      Thanks, Jason. I am often told by people that I remind them of George Castanza. Even if it is kind of creepy, I think it s the deep dark imaginary life that
      Message 2 of 4 , May 24 7:07 PM
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        Thanks, Jason.

        I am often told by people that I remind them of George Castanza.

        Even if it is kind of creepy, I think it's the deep dark imaginary
        life that provides that fertile soil out of which so many wonderful
        and worth-while things can grow. But nothing much grows in the dark.

        Walter.



        On 5/24/07, Jason Fisher <visualweasel@...> wrote:
        > To paraphrase Jerry Seinfeld (when George tells him all his deepest darkest fears and completely creeps him out): "Well, good luck with all *that*." Or to paraphrase Ross from "Friends" (talking to Chandler, ditto), "I said 'share', not 'scare'!"
        >
      • Jason Fisher
        ... Tell that to Tolkien, who wrote that it [a story] grows like a seed in the dark out of the leaf-mould of mind (Carpenter Tolkien: A Biography, 126,
        Message 3 of 4 , May 25 7:05 AM
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          > But nothing much grows in the dark.

          Tell that to Tolkien, who wrote that "it [a story] grows like a seed in the dark out of the leaf-mould of mind" (Carpenter Tolkien: A Biography, 126, emphasis added).

          Jason Fisher

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Walter Padgett
          Right. Good one. But it had to be brought out into the light for other people to see it and appreciate it. That was my point, though I didn t make it very
          Message 4 of 4 , May 25 2:43 PM
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            Right. Good one. But it had to be brought out into the light for other
            people to see it and appreciate it. That was my point, though I didn't make
            it very well. What I offered in my original ranting comment was a view of
            the leaf-mould of my own mind. And there was Tolkien stuff growing it it.

            On 5/25/07, Jason Fisher <visualweasel@...> wrote:
            >
            > > But nothing much grows in the dark.
            >
            > Tell that to Tolkien, who wrote that "it [a story] grows like a seed in
            > the dark out of the leaf-mould of mind" (Carpenter Tolkien: A Biography,
            > 126, emphasis added).
            >
            > Jason Fisher
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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