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Icelandic Film

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  • lynnmaudlin
    I just watched a rather interested movie on DVD, No Such Thing, in part because the cast includes those fabulous women, Helen Mirren and Julie Christie. A
    Message 1 of 9 , May 16, 2007
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      I just watched a rather interested movie on DVD, "No Such Thing," in
      part because the cast includes those fabulous women, Helen Mirren and
      Julie Christie.

      A fair chunk is set in Iceland and some Icelandic is spoken, which, of
      course, makes me think of LINGUISTS and Tolkien...

      any of you guys see this film?

      There's a monster...

      -- Lynn --
    • David Emerson
      ... Yes. I thought it was interesting but just slightly off-kilter, like it couldn t quite make up its mind what kind of film it wanted to be when it grew up.
      Message 2 of 9 , May 16, 2007
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        >I just watched a rather interested movie on DVD, "No Such Thing," in
        >part because the cast includes those fabulous women, Helen Mirren and
        >Julie Christie.
        >
        >A fair chunk is set in Iceland and some Icelandic is spoken, which, of
        >course, makes me think of LINGUISTS and Tolkien...
        >
        >any of you guys see this film?

        Yes. I thought it was interesting but just slightly off-kilter, like it couldn't quite make up its mind what kind of film it wanted to be when it grew up. I loved Sarah Polley's performance, though.

        And it does raise some interesting points about the possible intersection of myth and "reality", and what would happen when our known world is faced with the seemingly impossible. Also about what it would be like to not be able to die. JRRT touches on the sadness of immortality with the Eldar, of course, but at least they can choose to end the life of the body if they really want to (it just means hanging out in Mandos's boring limbo until the end of Arda....).

        emerdavid

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      • David Bratman
        ... The name of Julie Christie makes me think of the Inklings, because the film that originally made her name (and won her an Oscar) back in 1965, Darling ,
        Message 3 of 9 , May 16, 2007
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          At 11:03 PM 5/16/2007 +0000, you wrote:

          >I just watched a rather interested movie on DVD, "No Such Thing," in
          >part because the cast includes those fabulous women, Helen Mirren and
          >Julie Christie.
          >
          >A fair chunk is set in Iceland and some Icelandic is spoken, which, of
          >course, makes me think of LINGUISTS and Tolkien...

          The name of Julie Christie makes me think of the Inklings, because the film
          that originally made her name (and won her an Oscar) back in 1965,
          "Darling", includes a scene with her, Dirk Bogarde, and the Inklings' very
          own Hugo Dyson, who plays a famous writer Dirk (bringing his girlfriend
          along) has gone to interview.

          That's one of, I think, only two feature films that an Inkling was
          personally involved in the production of.
        • WendellWag@aol.com
          In a message dated 5/17/2007 1:48:46 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, dbratman@earthlink.net writes: That s one of, I think, only two feature films that an Inkling
          Message 4 of 9 , May 17, 2007
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            In a message dated 5/17/2007 1:48:46 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
            dbratman@... writes:

            That's one of, I think, only two feature films that an Inkling was
            personally involved in the production of.



            What was the other one?

            Wendell Wagner



            ************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • John D Rateliff
            Coghill s adaptation of DOCTOR FAUSTUS, wasn t it?
            Message 5 of 9 , May 17, 2007
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              Coghill's adaptation of DOCTOR FAUSTUS, wasn't it?



              On May 17, 2007, at 7:44 AM, WendellWag@... wrote:
              > In a message dated 5/17/2007 1:48:46 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
              > dbratman@... writes:
              >
              > That's one of, I think, only two feature films that an Inkling was
              > personally involved in the production of.
              >
              >
              > What was the other one?
              >
              > Wendell Wagner
            • Kim Jaudon
              I was listening to an NPR Bookworm interview with the poet John Ashbery this morning, and he made mention of Auden s early poetry and the use of Icelandic.
              Message 6 of 9 , May 17, 2007
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                I was listening to an NPR Bookworm interview with the poet John Ashbery this morning, and he made mention of Auden's early poetry and the use of Icelandic. The program was billed as a discussion of Ashbery's fascination with "nonsense and fantasy" and how that relates to our lives now. It was a wander-y, pause-y interview that I'm not sure quite makes its mark. Still...there are some entertaining thoughts in it, if you're looking for some background during lunch.

                The link is:

                http://www.kcrw.com/etc/programs/bw/bw070517john_ashbery/media_player_archives?action=listen

                Kim




                ---------------------------------
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              • Jason Fisher
                ... I was listening to an NPR Bookworm interview with the poet John Ashbery this morning, and he made mention of Auden s early poetry and the use of Icelandic.
                Message 7 of 9 , May 17, 2007
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                  --- Kim wrote ---
                  I was listening to an NPR Bookworm interview with the poet John Ashbery this morning, and he made mention of Auden's early poetry and the use of Icelandic. The program was billed as a discussion of Ashbery's fascination with "nonsense and fantasy" and how that relates to our lives now. It was a wander-y, pause-y interview that I'm not sure quite makes its mark. Still...there are some entertaining thoughts in it, if you're looking for some background during lunch.


                  I love how this seems to equate nonsense with fantasy, like they're two breeds of the same animal. :-/

                  Jason

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • lynnmaudlin
                  David, I didn t know that! wow - Hugo Dyson... I ll have to re-watch that film; haven t seen it in *decades* -- Lynn -- ... the film ... Inklings very
                  Message 8 of 9 , May 17, 2007
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                    David, I didn't know that! wow - Hugo Dyson... I'll have to re-watch
                    that film; haven't seen it in *decades*
                    -- Lynn --

                    --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, David Bratman <dbratman@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > The name of Julie Christie makes me think of the Inklings, because
                    the film
                    > that originally made her name (and won her an Oscar) back in 1965,
                    > "Darling", includes a scene with her, Dirk Bogarde, and the
                    Inklings' very
                    > own Hugo Dyson, who plays a famous writer Dirk (bringing his girlfriend
                    > along) has gone to interview.
                    >
                    > That's one of, I think, only two feature films that an Inkling was
                    > personally involved in the production of.
                    >
                  • lynnmaudlin
                    Actually, I can kind of see that, like nonesense is the distorted mirror-image of fantasy; order and organization have been stripped out, leaving bones that
                    Message 9 of 9 , May 17, 2007
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                      Actually, I can kind of see that, like "nonesense" is the distorted
                      mirror-image of fantasy; order and organization have been stripped
                      out, leaving bones that no longer "parse", as it were...

                      Of course, it requires that we don't understand "nonesense" as a
                      pejorative--

                      -- Lynn --

                      --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, Jason Fisher <visualweasel@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > I love how this seems to equate nonsense with fantasy, like they're
                      two breeds of the same animal. :-/
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