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Roy Campbell on the Toledo Martyrs: A Query.

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  • +Seraphim Joseph Sigrist
    Friends, this is perhaps peripheral but Roy Campbell was a friend of Tolkien dont know how he hit it off with CSW, Lewis didnt like him much we are told. well
    Message 1 of 2 , May 11, 2007
      Friends, this is perhaps peripheral but
      Roy Campbell was a friend of Tolkien dont know
      how he hit it off with CSW, Lewis didnt like him
      much we are told. well but query

      Has anyone a copy that they could scan for me
      of the poem by the South African poet and
      adventurer Roy Campbell about the martyrdom of the
      Toledo Carmelites who had taken refuge in the Campbells
      house in March 1936 (while bringing him st John of
      the Cross to translate)
      they were taken out by the Reds and left dead
      in the street under a tarpaulin with the words
      inscribed "This is a deed of the Cheka"(red secret
      police)
      Campbell tried to follow them to death but says
      a rifle butt struck him down and the others
      entered glory and he "rebuffed for a harlequin."
      (as I recall)
      the poem compares the martyrs to toreros(Campbell
      also translated Lorca tangentially ...)

      It is among other places no doubt included in
      the introduction to the penguin edition of the
      Poems of St John of the Cross. which I left behind
      in some move keeping only another translation but
      then losing this poem
      Thank you so much!
      +Seraphim Joseph Sigrist
      ssigrist@...
    • John D Rateliff
      Dear S.J.S.: I don t own any of Roy Campbell s work, but if the poem you mean is The Carmelites of Toledo , then thirteen lines from it are quoted in Joseph
      Message 2 of 2 , May 13, 2007
        Dear S.J.S.:

        I don't own any of Roy Campbell's work, but if the poem you mean
        is "The Carmelites of Toledo", then thirteen lines from it are quoted
        in Joseph Pearce's book on Campbell (BLOOMSBURY AND BEYOND: THE
        FRIENDS AND ENEMIES OF ROY CAMPBELL, page 187); if that would help,
        let me know and I'll send you the excerpt. If you need the whole
        thing, I'm sure it's in one of the collections of Campbell's poems at
        the university library, but I'm not going to have a chance to go down
        there before the end of the month, so that'd depend on how soon you
        needed it.

        However, I should point out that while the monks were indeed
        martyred, they were NOT dragged out of the Campbell's house, nor did
        Campbell himself "tr[y] to follow them to death"; indeed, he and his
        wife hid all the crucifixes in their house to try and hide the fact
        that they were Catholics. In general, it's best to be wary of
        Campbell's accounts; he was a pathological liar who recast events
        after the fact in order to paint himself in a more favorable light.
        Nor was Campbell a friend of JRRT, although Tolkien admired his
        persona; they only seem to have met twice, once when Campbell crashed
        a Bird & Baby session and once at an evening Inklings. Lewis disliked
        him with some intensity ("I loathed and loathe Roy Campbell's
        particular blend of Catholicism and Fascism, and told him so" --CSL,
        Jan.1963).

        Is it a good poem?

        --JDR


        On May 11, 2007, at 10:03 AM, +Seraphim Joseph Sigrist wrote:
        > Friends, this is perhaps peripheral but
        > Roy Campbell was a friend of Tolkien dont know
        > how he hit it off with CSW, Lewis didnt like him
        > much we are told. well but query
        >
        > Has anyone a copy that they could scan for me
        > of the poem by the South African poet and
        > adventurer Roy Campbell about the martyrdom of the
        > Toledo Carmelites who had taken refuge in the Campbells
        > house in March 1936 (while bringing him st John of
        > the Cross to translate)
        > they were taken out by the Reds and left dead
        > in the street under a tarpaulin with the words
        > inscribed "This is a deed of the Cheka"(red secret
        > police)
        > Campbell tried to follow them to death but says
        > a rifle butt struck him down and the others
        > entered glory and he "rebuffed for a harlequin."
        > (as I recall)
        > the poem compares the martyrs to toreros(Campbell
        > also translated Lorca tangentially ...)
        >
        > It is among other places no doubt included in
        > the introduction to the penguin edition of the
        > Poems of St John of the Cross. which I left behind
        > in some move keeping only another translation but
        > then losing this poem
        > Thank you so much!
        > +Seraphim Joseph Sigrist
        > ssigrist@...
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
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