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Re: [mythsoc] Re: which biography?

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  • WendellWag@aol.com
    ... In a message dated 4/4/2007 10:51:22 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, dbratman@earthlink.net writes: If that s evidence of the quickness of Wilson s reading,
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 4, 2007
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      In reply to my comment:

      > Wilson also makes errors because he wants to fit Lewis into the slots that
      >he already had established in his mind before he began his research. This
      >partly accounts for the weird Freudian readings of Lewis that Wilson does.

      In a message dated 4/4/2007 10:51:22 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
      dbratman@... writes:

      If that's evidence of the quickness of Wilson's reading, then David
      Holbrook must have gone through Lewis's work in a nanosecond.



      I expressed myself badly in my last post about this. I was saying that this
      is one additional sort of error that Wilson makes, not that it was
      necessarily typical of the sort of errors that biographers who work quickly tend to
      make.

      Wendell Wagner



      ************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com


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    • WendellWag@aol.com
      In a message dated 4/4/2007 10:51:22 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, dbratman@earthlink.net writes: This may be true (but I m not entirely sure; see below).
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 4, 2007
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        In a message dated 4/4/2007 10:51:22 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
        dbratman@... writes:

        This may be true (but I'm not entirely sure; see below). What's odd,
        though, is that of all the many critiques of Wilson's errors I've read,
        none but yours just now has made this argument. Most of the critics, as
        you've already noted, fall into the "death by a thousand cuts" approach.



        Also, a lot of the reaction to Wilson's book among long-time readers of
        Lewis was in reply to the way that mainstream literary outlets seemed to be
        giving a pass to Wilson. It was as though the mainstream reviewers had been
        saying, "Wilson writes very polished prose, has a major literary reputation, makes
        some snide comments that I find funny, and has a lot of glib opinions which
        fit my worldview already." The mainstream literary world seemed to be
        accepting Wilson and dismissing other opinion about Lewis because Wilson was one of
        their own. In reaction, long-time readers of Lewis dismissed Wilson because
        he wasn't one of their own.

        Wendell Wagner



        ************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com


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