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Re: ruby slippers & illustrations

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  • William Cloud Hicklin
    ... color. Yes, they were. Or at least pre-1935, when the color disappeared. I suspect much earlier, since they were well- constructed- and the paper appeared
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 7 10:17 AM
      --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, David Lenander <d-lena@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > If they were first editions, the illlustrations were in
      color.

      Yes, they were. Or at least pre-1935, when the color
      disappeared. I suspect much earlier, since they were well-
      constructed- and the paper appeared to be considerably more aged
      than the same library's 1st-ed Hobbit (gasp!). Of course at
      that age I wouldn't have noticed if the plates were tipped or
      sewn in.

      > I would say that the "art nouveau" illustrations someone
      remembers fondly
      > were probably Neil's

      Absolutely. I suppose a fussy art historian would object to my
      use of the term, but it's not far off. Something of the same
      aesthetic as the Walking Liberty half-dollar (for those who
      remember it).
      >
      > I have seen the Books of Wonder _Emerald City
      > of Oz_ and compared it with a first edition. This was notable
      for
      > using a peculiar metallic green ink on some of the full-color
      > illustrations, maybe 12 to 24 of them, and the dust jacket.
      The Books
      > of Wonder edition looks like the green ink sections have been
      dusted
      > with gold powder before drying, for an interesting effect, but
      it's
      > quite different from the 1st edition weird dark green metallic
      ink.

      Apparently cost. Books of Wonder found that reproducing the
      original ink would be enormously expensive, driving the price
      beyond the range of most of the intended market.
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