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Colin Havard recalls the Inklings: Oct. 26 presentation in St. Louis.

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  • Mike Foster
    Colin Havard: An Inkling s Son Remembers J.R.R. Tolkien & C.S. Lewis Presented with Mike Foster Thursday, Oct. 26, 7 p.m., at St. Louis Community College,
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 26, 2006
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      Colin Havard: An Inkling's Son Remembers J.R.R. Tolkien & C.S. Lewis


      Presented with Mike Foster

      Thursday, Oct. 26, 7 p.m., at St. Louis Community College, South
      County Education & Training Center, 4115 Meramec Bottom Road, St. Louis,
      Missouri.

      Mark Colin Havard, the son of Dr. Robert (Humphrey) Havard of
      Oxford, who was the personal physician of Tolkien and Lewis as well as a
      member of the famous "Inklings" fellowship, occasionally attended
      Inklings sessions along with his father. His recollections of those
      men and those meetings, house-sitting for Lewis at the Kilns, and other
      anecdotes comprise this evening of literary reminiscence.

      Prof. Mike Foster, the North American representative of
      the Tolkien Society, teaches a course on Tolkien at Bradley
      University in Peoria, Illinois.

      The event is free and open to the public.

      For more information, contact Paul Nygard
      <PNygard@...>.


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    • John D Rateliff
      In the Things I Didn t Know That Probably Aren t So department, came across an interesting unfact about Tolkien in a guidebook on England, part of the
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 3, 2006
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        In the "Things I Didn't Know That Probably Aren't So" department,
        came across an interesting unfact about Tolkien in a guidebook on
        England, part of the "Lonely Planet" series. In their entry on the
        Gloucester area, they mention the Forest of Dean and state that "JRR
        Tolkien was a regular visitor and the forest is said to have inspired
        the setting for The Lord of the Rings" (page 420). Highly unlikely, I
        shd think. And while I admire the deliberate vagueness of 'is said',
        I haven't come across this particular claim before; anyone know where
        it comes from?
        --JDR



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      • WendellWag@aol.com
        Here s a website that claims that Tolkien wrote a chapter in a book about an archeological site in the Forest of Dean:
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 3, 2006
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          Here's a website that claims that Tolkien wrote a chapter in a book about an
          archeological site in the Forest of Dean:

          _http://www.bbc.co.uk/gloucestershire/films/tolkien.shtml_
          (http://www.bbc.co.uk/gloucestershire/films/tolkien.shtml)


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        • Margaret Dean
          ... This would presumably be J.R.R. Tolkien, The Name Nodens , Appendix 1 to =Report on the Excavation ... in Lydney Park, Gloucestershire=, Reports of the
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 4, 2006
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            WendellWag@... wrote:
            >
            > Here's a website that claims that Tolkien wrote a chapter in a book about an
            > archeological site in the Forest of Dean:
            >
            > _http://www.bbc.co.uk/gloucestershire/films/tolkien.shtml_
            > (http://www.bbc.co.uk/gloucestershire/films/tolkien.shtml)

            This would presumably be J.R.R. Tolkien, "The Name 'Nodens'",
            Appendix 1 to =Report on the Excavation ... in Lydney Park,
            Gloucestershire=, Reports of the Research Committee of the
            Society of Antiquaries, no. 9 (London: Oxford University Press,
            1932), pp. 132-7. Tom Shippey discusses this piece of
            scholarship in THE ROAD TO MIDDLE-EARTH in the chapter,
            "Philological Inquiries."

            So it would appear to be quite true!


            --Margaret Dean (no relation!)
            <margdean@...>
          • David Bratman
            It s true that Tolkien wrote that article on linguistic evidence regarding an archaeological dig in (or right near, more precisely) the Forest of Dean. That s
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 4, 2006
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              It's true that Tolkien wrote that article on linguistic evidence regarding an archaeological dig in (or right near, more precisely) the Forest of Dean. That's the only possible connection that came to my mind, too. But I don't recall any evidence that he actually visited the dig itself - he was asked by the archaeologists to write this linguistic analysis - still less that he frequented the Forest of Dean, let alone that it inspired LOTR or, more relevantly, that this rather moth-eaten mining district is at all capable of inspiring the mighty forests of Middle-earth.

              I'm all in favor of traveling Britain and finding landscape that reminds you of Tolkien's work. But looking for the "real spot" that Actually Inspired The Author is, in the case of Middle-earth, a bane upon existence.
            • Wayne G. Hammond
              ... Although it s true that Tolkien wrote Appendix 1 to the report on the excavation at Lydney Park, there s not a shred of evidence that he ever visited the
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 4, 2006
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                Margaret wrote:

                ><mailto:WendellWag%40aol.com>WendellWag<mailto:WendellWag%40aol.com>@...
                >wrote:
                > >
                > > Here's a website that claims that Tolkien wrote a chapter in a book
                > about an
                > > archeological site in the Forest of Dean:
                > >
                > >
                > _<http://www.bbc.co.uk/gloucestershire/films/tolkien.shtml_>http://www.bbc.co.uk/gloucestershire/films/tolkien.shtml_
                > > (http://www.bbc.co.uk/gloucestershire/films/tolkien.shtml)
                >
                >This would presumably be J.R.R. Tolkien, "The Name 'Nodens'",
                >Appendix 1 to =Report on the Excavation ... in Lydney Park,
                >Gloucestershire=, Reports of the Research Committee of the
                >Society of Antiquaries, no. 9 (London: Oxford University Press,
                >1932), pp. 132-7. Tom Shippey discusses this piece of
                >scholarship in THE ROAD TO MIDDLE-EARTH in the chapter,
                >"Philological Inquiries."
                >
                >So it would appear to be quite true!

                Although it's true that Tolkien wrote Appendix 1 to the report on the
                excavation at Lydney Park, there's not a shred of evidence that he ever
                visited the site or helped with the study in any other way. The comments
                reported by the BBC are one of many (to say the least) dubious claims to
                Tolkien's presence, or to a source of inspiration for _The Lord of the
                Rings_, that were put forward at the time of the Jackson films.

                Wayne Hammond


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