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Narnia postponed

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  • Stolzi
    LOS ANGELES (Hollywood Reporter) - Disney has moved its Narnia sequel off the Christmas 2007 release schedule to summer 2008 to avoid competition with the
    Message 1 of 5 , May 17, 2006
      LOS ANGELES (Hollywood Reporter) - Disney has moved its "Narnia" sequel off
      the Christmas 2007 release schedule to summer 2008 to avoid competition with
      the similarly themed fantasy fable "The Water Horse."

      http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060517/en_nm/chronicles_dc_2

      Diamond Proudbrook
    • John D Rateliff
      Here s a question I came across earlier this week that at first I thought would be easy to answer, but the more I look at it the thornier it seems. Simply put,
      Message 2 of 5 , May 18, 2006
        Here's a question I came across earlier this week that at first I
        thought would be easy to answer, but the more I look at it the
        thornier it seems. Simply put, it's this: can we assume that, if a
        book was on the Church's list of forbidden books (the Index Librorum
        Prohibitorum), that Tolkien never read it? So far as I can tell, the
        last edition of this (the 32nd) came out in 1948 and the ban on
        reading books listed in it was not lifted until 1966, when Tolkien
        was already in his mid-seventies. Does anyone have a good feel for
        how strictly twentieth century Catholics, particularly in England,
        took this prohibition? Were most even aware of which books were and
        were not on the list (e.g., would even a reasonably well-informed
        Catholic know he could read Tristan Shandy but not A Sentimental
        Journey)? Any insights much appreciated.
        --JDR




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • David Bratman
        ... Biting my tongue in an unsuccessful attempt to keep from saying that nobody can read Tristan Shandy, and that even Tristram Shandy is quite a challenge. DB
        Message 3 of 5 , May 18, 2006
          At 12:47 PM 5/18/2006 -0700, JDR wrote:

          > would even a reasonably well-informed
          >Catholic know he could read Tristan Shandy but not A Sentimental
          >Journey)?

          Biting my tongue in an unsuccessful attempt to keep from saying that nobody
          can read Tristan Shandy, and that even Tristram Shandy is quite a challenge.

          DB
        • Berni Phillips
          From: John D Rateliff ... I m not a Tolkien expert (although my husband is), but I would assume that Tolkien did not read banned
          Message 4 of 5 , May 18, 2006
            From: "John D Rateliff" <sacnoth@...>

            > Here's a question I came across earlier this week that at first I
            > thought would be easy to answer, but the more I look at it the
            > thornier it seems. Simply put, it's this: can we assume that, if a
            > book was on the Church's list of forbidden books (the Index Librorum
            > Prohibitorum), that Tolkien never read it? So far as I can tell, the
            > last edition of this (the 32nd) came out in 1948 and the ban on
            > reading books listed in it was not lifted until 1966, when Tolkien
            > was already in his mid-seventies. Does anyone have a good feel for
            > how strictly twentieth century Catholics, particularly in England,
            > took this prohibition? Were most even aware of which books were and
            > were not on the list (e.g., would even a reasonably well-informed
            > Catholic know he could read Tristan Shandy but not A Sentimental
            > Journey)? Any insights much appreciated.

            I'm not a Tolkien expert (although my husband is), but I would assume
            that Tolkien did not read banned books. Child of Vatican II that I am,
            even I remember the banned book list. Such lists were disseminated
            through Catholic publications and parish bulletins. A good research task
            would be to find out if the Tolkien household received the British
            equivalent of My Sunday Visitor (I think that's the name of the old
            American Catholic magazine that was so common). Also the local
            bishops often send letters about such matters.

            (On a similar note, we locally have a woman who is calling herself an
            ordained Roman Catholic priest. I never heard of her until I saw the
            little snippet in our Sunday bulletin at church warning people. The
            local Catholic newspaper (which is sent to all households registered
            in the diocese) had a little article on her as well. This is how Tolkien
            would have found out about banned books, I imagine.)

            Berni
          • Stolzi
            ... From: Berni Phillips ... Am I correct in thinking that a scholar, who had a good reason, could obtain dispensation to read a
            Message 5 of 5 , May 19, 2006
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Berni Phillips" <bernip@...>



              > From: "John D Rateliff" <sacnoth@...>
              >
              >> Does anyone have a good feel for
              >> how strictly twentieth century Catholics, particularly in England,
              >> took this prohibition? Were most even aware of which books were and
              >> were not on the list (e.g., would even a reasonably well-informed
              >> Catholic know he could read Tristan Shandy but not A Sentimental
              >> Journey)? Any insights much appreciated.
              >
              > I'm not a Tolkien expert (although my husband is), but I would assume
              > that Tolkien did not read banned books.

              Am I correct in thinking that a scholar, who had a good reason, could obtain
              dispensation to read a banned book?

              I suspect that Miss Flannery O'Connor read plenty of books on the Index, but
              she was in another country and a later generation, though a devout Catholic.

              Diamond Proudbrook
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