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More on Elwins, was: [mythsoc] Inklings quasi-sighting in UK politics

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  • Stolzi
    I have a program which posts Orthodox Saints of the Day to the desktop. The authors branched out to include Western saints from before the Great Schism
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 22, 2006
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      I have a program which posts Orthodox "Saints of the Day" to the desktop.
      The authors branched out to include Western saints from before the Great
      Schism (separation of Rome and Orthodox), and here's one for today.


      Troparion of St Elwin Tone 1

      Leaving thy native Ireland, thou didst labour for Christ/ in the remoteness
      of Kernow,/ giving thyself up to ascetic struggles and missionary
      journeyings,/ O Father Elwin./ Wherefore we pray for courage and strength to
      emulate thy example/ for the salvation of our souls.

      And - oh my gosh! This site
      http://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=3107 says:

      "Companion of St. Breaca from Ireland to Cornwall, England, also called
      Elvis
      or Allen."

      =Elvis!=

      Diamond Proudbrook
    • Lezlie
      - ... And, one more: Isn t wen (old) Welsh for maid ? As in Branwen or Olwen the Whitefooted? Believe I learned that when taking Welsh lessons back in the
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 23, 2006
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        -
        >
        > "Companion of St. Breaca from Ireland to Cornwall, England, also called
        > Elvis
        > or Allen."
        >
        > =Elvis!=
        >
        > Diamond Proudbrook
        >

        And, one more: Isn't "wen" (old) Welsh for "maid"? As in Branwen or
        Olwen the Whitefooted? Believe I learned that when taking Welsh
        lessons back in the '70's as a part of a Celtic myth & folklore course
        at Harvard---

        I really can't recall a Tolkien reference, either -- but, it sounds
        sort of "Tolkienian" -- so, I expect that's the real source. Lezlie
      • alexeik@aol.com
        ... From: Lezlie To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thu, 23 Feb 2006 15:38:31 -0000 Subject: Re: More on Elwins, was: [mythsoc] Inklings
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 24, 2006
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          -----Original Message-----
          From: Lezlie <lezlie1@...>
          To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thu, 23 Feb 2006 15:38:31 -0000
          Subject: Re: More on Elwins, was: [mythsoc] Inklings quasi-sighting in UK politics


          -
          >
          > "Companion of St. Breaca from Ireland to Cornwall, England, also called
          > Elvis
          > or Allen."
          >
          > =Elvis!=
          >
          > Diamond Proudbrook
          >

          And, one more: Isn't "wen" (old) Welsh for "maid"? As in Branwen or
          Olwen the Whitefooted? Believe I learned that when taking Welsh
          lessons back in the '70's as a part of a Celtic myth & folklore course
          at Harvard---

          >>

          No, it's the feminine form of the word "white" (the masculine form is _(g)wyn_), which is often a part of personal names (it means "blessed" or "fortunate" as well as "white"). You're thinking of _morwen_ "maid".
          Alexei


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Lezlie
          ... is _(g)wyn_), which is often a part of personal names (it means blessed or fortunate as well as white ). You re thinking of _morwen_ maid . ...
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 1, 2006
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            > >
            >
            > And, one more: Isn't "wen" (old) Welsh for "maid"? As in Branwen or
            > Olwen the Whitefooted? Believe I learned that when taking Welsh
            > lessons back in the '70's as a part of a Celtic myth & folklore course
            > at Harvard---
            >
            > >>
            >
            > No, it's the feminine form of the word "white" (the masculine form
            is _(g)wyn_), which is often a part of personal names (it means
            "blessed" or "fortunate" as well as "white"). You're thinking of
            _morwen_ "maid".
            > Alexei

            Ah--yes... it's -- ever so slowly -- coming back to me. Curious: How
            does Guinevere become "white shadow"? Thanks, Lezlie
          • alexeik@aol.com
            ... From: Lezlie To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wed, 01 Mar 2006 12:06:52 -0000 Subject: Re: More on Elwins, was: [mythsoc] Inklings
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 1, 2006
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              -----Original Message-----
              From: Lezlie <lezlie1@...>
              To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Wed, 01 Mar 2006 12:06:52 -0000
              Subject: Re: More on Elwins, was: [mythsoc] Inklings quasi-sighting in UK politics



              >
              > No, it's the feminine form of the word "white" (the masculine form
              is _(g)wyn_), which is often a part of personal names (it means
              "blessed" or "fortunate" as well as "white"). You're thinking of
              _morwen_ "maid".
              > Alexei

              Ah--yes... it's -- ever so slowly -- coming back to me. Curious: How
              does Guinevere become "white shadow"? Thanks, Lezlie

              <<
              "Guinevere" is _Gwenhwyfar_: _gwen_ "white" (feminine, with original 'g' unlenited) + _hwyfar_ an otherwise unattested word that is nevertheless obviously s cognate of Irish _siabhra_ "apparition, phantom, fairy being".
              I had a typo in my earlier post: "maiden" is _morwyn_ (from an earlier *_morigna_). _Morwen_ is actually a personal name, meaning "sea-white".
              Alexei






              The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
              Yahoo! Groups Links






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Lezlie
              ... g unlenited) + _hwyfar_ an otherwise unattested word that is nevertheless obviously s cognate of Irish _siabhra_ apparition, phantom, fairy being . ...
              Message 6 of 6 , Mar 3, 2006
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                --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, alexeik@... wrote:

                >
                > Ah--yes... it's -- ever so slowly -- coming back to me. Curious: How
                > does Guinevere become "white shadow"? Thanks, Lezlie
                >
                > <<
                > "Guinevere" is _Gwenhwyfar_: _gwen_ "white" (feminine, with original
                'g' unlenited) + _hwyfar_ an otherwise unattested word that is
                nevertheless obviously s cognate of Irish _siabhra_ "apparition,
                phantom, fairy being".
                > I had a typo in my earlier post: "maiden" is _morwyn_ (from an
                earlier *_morigna_). _Morwen_ is actually a personal name, meaning
                "sea-white".
                > Alexei



                Thanks-- very useful. Lezlie
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