Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [mythsoc] Repressed Angels and Lewis

Expand Messages
  • John D Rateliff
    ... I don t think there s any evidence that this is actually the case; it s just Wendell s guess. He doesn t like the book, so he concludes the author must
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 13, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      On Feb 11, 2006, at 7:47 AM, Cai Cherie wrote:
      > I didn't know Wilson was pressured into writing a book he wasn't
      > really inspired to write, and may have found spiritually
      > troublesome to write

      I don't think there's any evidence that this is actually the case;
      it's just Wendell's guess. He doesn't like the book, so he concludes
      the author must not have been inspired to write it.

      > Perhaps this shows my isolation from most of America (since I
      > attend a liberal church in a large northeastern city) but I have
      > assumed that this was a hoax and parody -- a funny parody too. I
      > await with baited breath the last chapter and the full addendum on
      > Tolkien. I do think this a joke site.

      I'm afraid they're serious, more's the pity. Which of course doesn't
      mean their misplaced disdain isn't amusing in and of itself. That you
      can enjoy it speaks well of you, but not of them.


      On Jan 30, 2006, at 7:28 PM, Stolz. wrote:
      > A Dutchman, hitherto unknown to me, administers a welcome pasting
      > to A.N.
      > Wilson's book:
      >
      > http://www.solcon.nl/arendsmilde/cslewis/reflections/e-
      > definitivebiography.htm

      Finally had a chance to read carefully through Smilde's piece, which
      he himself describes all too accurately as a "diatribe" and "one-
      sided". Find I disagree with his whole claim that Wilson writes well
      but without insight; that seems a better description of Smilde
      himself, who has a glib turn of phrase. I think Wilson's the best
      biography of Lewis so far, despite all its faults, precisely because
      he writes with more insight into CSL than any previous biographer.
      Wish he'd let a fact-checker spend a week fixing all the little
      glitches that critics of the book hammered it for, but Smilde reveals
      that most of these were fixed in subsequent printings. What does that
      say about those who continue to criticize him for passages no longer
      in the book?

      I used to think the three biggest gaps in our understanding of Lewis
      were his relationship with his father, his relationship with Joy
      Gresham, and his relationship with Janie Moore. Wilson has made a
      start at how badly CSL treated Albert Lewis, Lyle Dorsett did a
      wonderful job of recovering JDGL's story, and Fr. Hooper's edition of
      the CSL-AG correspondence (THEY STAND TOGETHER) gives us as much as
      we'll probably ever know about his feelings for Mrs. Moore, but I
      don't think we'll ever get CSL as Janie Moore saw him. Pity, because
      its absence allows Warnie to demonize her (three days a week she
      forced the Great Man to do chores. Sometimes he even had to walk the
      dog! Horrors!).

      --JDR

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • WendellWag@aol.com
      In a message dated 2/13/2006 12:36:54 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, sacnoth@earthlink.net writes: I don t think there s any evidence that this is actually the
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 13, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        In a message dated 2/13/2006 12:36:54 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
        sacnoth@... writes:

        I don't think there's any evidence that this is actually the case;
        it's just Wendell's guess. He doesn't like the book, so he concludes
        the author must not have been inspired to write it.


        Wilson said so. He spoke at the Cheltenham Literary Festival in October of
        1989, while I was living in England. He was mostly finished with writing the
        book at that point. He said that the publisher asked him to write a Lewis
        biography, even though he wasn't particularly interested in it. The publisher
        doubtlessly knew that books about Lewis sell quite well, which is probably
        why there are too many of them.

        Wendell Wagner


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • John D Rateliff
        ... I hadn t been aware of this; thanks for setting me straight on this point. I m planning to get a copy of the revised Wilson and read it when I have time
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 15, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          On Feb 13, 2006, at 7:28 PM, WendellWag@... wrote:
          > Wilson said so. He spoke at the Cheltenham Literary Festival in
          > October of
          > 1989, while I was living in England. He was mostly finished with
          > writing the
          > book at that point. He said that the publisher asked him to write
          > a Lewis
          > biography, even though he wasn't particularly interested in it.
          > The publisher
          > doubtlessly knew that books about Lewis sell quite well, which is
          > probably
          > why there are too many of them.
          >
          > Wendell Wagner

          I hadn't been aware of this; thanks for setting me straight on this
          point. I'm planning to get a copy of the revised Wilson and read it
          when I have time (there's a considerable pile of Tolkien-related
          books in the queue ahead of it), and I'll keep this in mind when
          reading it and see if I reach the same conclusions you did.
          Oh, and good post on the recent tendency to overstate the
          importance, good and bad, of Lewis's apologetics

          --John R.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.