Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: The Narnian

Expand Messages
  • jchristopher
    ... John-- I have a review coming up in _Mythprint_ eventually (if Ellie has room for it). I thought Jacobs book was good as an interpretive look at Lewis;
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 30, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      >John D. Rateliff wrote:
      >
      >>Had to give up on trying to read Alan Jacobs' THE NARNIAN a week or so ago,
      >>since found myself getting too annoyed at the factual errors. I very much
      >>enjoyed some of the things Jacobs had to say (he's written the best short
      >>bit on Barfield's importance to Lewis I've ever come across) but couldn't
      >>stick out all the misreadings and contradictions (he immediately followed
      >>the Barfield passage by asserting that Harwood and Hamilton-Jenkins were
      >>Inklings). Can someone who enjoyed the book post something nice about it,
      >>reasons why you enjoyed it? Maybe I'm being too harsh on it, and a different
      >>perspective might enable me to pick it back up and finish the thing.
      >>
      >> --John R.

      John--

      I have a review coming up in _Mythprint_ eventually (if Ellie has room for
      it). I thought Jacobs' book was good as an interpretive look at Lewis; except
      for a few letters, it didn't involve original research. I think one can make
      a case that Jacobs never got around to reading Carpenter's _The Inklings_ (not
      just because of the passage you cite, but it's one of the major pieces of
      evidence). It would have helped, factually, if Jacobs had used the third
      edition of Sayer's biography (the introduction is changed), etc. But Jacobs
      manages some insights into Lewis that are interesting and probably true--I'm
      thinking of Lewis's confusion while Davidman was moving toward marriage.

      --Joe
    • Elizabeth Hardy
      I ve only just begun reading it (Christmas gift from my wonderful husband who always gives books and jewelry), but I am having trouble already. I ll post a
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 1, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        I've only just begun reading it (Christmas gift from my wonderful husband who always gives books and jewelry), but I am having trouble already. I'll post a reaction when (if) I finish.
        Factual errors are not exclusive to Jacobs, though. I remember being amazed at Sayer's assertion that Lewis read the entire Faerie Queene in one sitting, only to read in Lewis's letters to Arthur Greeves that it took him some months of "spare time" reading to complete. It is sometimes difficult to separate what a remarkable person like Lewis might have done from what he really did, and even people who knew him can become confused and blur reality and possibility.
        (I often run into this same problem with Daniel Boone. I live in his old stomping grounds. He had the unfortunate habit of believing the tall tales others wrote about him! )
        Elizabeth


        jchristopher <jchristopher@...> wrote:
        >John D. Rateliff wrote:
        >
        >>Had to give up on trying to read Alan Jacobs' THE NARNIAN a week or so ago,
        >>since found myself getting too annoyed at the factual errors. I very much
        >>enjoyed some of the things Jacobs had to say (he's written the best short
        >>bit on Barfield's importance to Lewis I've ever come across) but couldn't
        >>stick out all the misreadings and contradictions (he immediately followed
        >>the Barfield passage by asserting that Harwood and Hamilton-Jenkins were
        >>Inklings). Can someone who enjoyed the book post something nice about it,
        >>reasons why you enjoyed it? Maybe I'm being too harsh on it, and a different
        >>perspective might enable me to pick it back up and finish the thing.
        >>
        >> --John R.

        John--

        I have a review coming up in _Mythprint_ eventually (if Ellie has room for
        it). I thought Jacobs' book was good as an interpretive look at Lewis; except
        for a few letters, it didn't involve original research. I think one can make
        a case that Jacobs never got around to reading Carpenter's _The Inklings_ (not
        just because of the passage you cite, but it's one of the major pieces of
        evidence). It would have helped, factually, if Jacobs had used the third
        edition of Sayer's biography (the introduction is changed), etc. But Jacobs
        manages some insights into Lewis that are interesting and probably true--I'm
        thinking of Lewis's confusion while Davidman was moving toward marriage.

        --Joe



        The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org



        SPONSORED LINKS
        Writing book Writing a book Writing child book Book writing software Science fiction and fantasy Writing a book report

        ---------------------------------
        YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


        Visit your group "mythsoc" on the web.

        To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        mythsoc-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


        ---------------------------------







        ---------------------------------

        What are the most popular cars? Find out at Yahoo! Autos

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.