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Re: [mythsoc] The Magic Thanksgiving Pudding and Philip Pullet-man

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  • Bonnie Callahan
    HI fellow Mythopoeics: Great input in my inbox this morning. Wendell, Diamond s Arthurian tale, DB & CH s debates. It s all good. Thank you for being my
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 24, 2005
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      HI fellow Mythopoeics:

      Great input in my inbox this morning. Wendell, Diamond's Arthurian tale, DB & CH's
      debates. It's
      all good. Thank you for being my colleagues! And thanks to the cosmos
      for everything else.

      I have an angle on Pullman & Narnia & Christianity, but I want to warn folks that some
      may
      find it...well...not to their liking. I expect to take some flak for it if I put it
      out there publicly. Perhaps I should send it to interested persons off-list.

      Bonnie


      WendellWag@... wrote:

      > I presently reading an Australian children's fantasy novel called _The Magic
      > Pudding_ written and illustrated by Norman Lindsay. It was first published
      > in 1918 and is now back in print in the U.S. from The New York Review
      > Children's Collection. This edition has an introduction by Philip Pullman in which
      > he calls it "the funniest children's book ever written." Perhaps it's not
      > quite as great as Pullman claims it to be, although it's very good. It's a
      > little bit reminiscent of the Alice books, as the (reasonably polite) main
      > character meets a bunch of characters who are constantly bickering with each other
      > over nothing. Maybe it's also a bit like _The Adventures of Huckleberry
      > Finn_, in which a younger character is accompanied on his travels by a couple of
      > older con-man characters. Indeed, in some sense it's a picaresque novel,
      > being about the travels of rogues.
      >
      > The reason why I mention this book is something that Pullman says in the
      > introduction. He says that Lindsay "had a great cause, which was to persecute
      > his mortal enemy, the wowser" (where "wowser" is the Australian slang term for
      > a "prim, narrow-minded, pompous, Puritanical, humorless, spoilsport"
      > person). In a way though, this misreads Lindsay's intentions. It's not a book in
      > which the rogues are entirely treated as the heroes. This would be like
      > claiming that the Mad Hatter or the Cheshire Cat are the heroes of the Alice
      > books. And it's this sort of overemphasizing the rule-breaking aspects of this
      > novel that shows me why Pullman dislikes Narnia so much. He can't accept that
      > a great novel might not be about kicking down the walls of the establishment.
      >
      > This is why I don't want to read only novels that are recommended by a
      > single person. Heck, I don't even want my own literary opinions to rule. I want
      > books to express lots of different opinions, tastes, and personalities. It's
      > possible to like both the Narnia books and _The Magic Pudding_.
      >
      > Wendell Wagner
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Dean Rowley
      ... SOME CUT ... REST CUT I would like to see it. Dean Rowley deand12000@yahoo.com __________________________________ Yahoo! Mail - PC Magazine Editors Choice
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 24, 2005
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        --- Bonnie Callahan <bonolatm@...> wrote:

        > HI fellow Mythopoeics:
        >
        SOME CUT
        >
        > I have an angle on Pullman & Narnia & Christianity,
        > but I want to warn folks that some
        > may
        > find it...well...not to their liking. I expect to
        > take some flak for it if I put it
        > out there publicly. Perhaps I should send it to
        > interested persons off-list.
        >
        > Bonnie
        >
        REST CUT
        I would like to see it.
        Dean Rowley
        deand12000@...




        __________________________________
        Yahoo! Mail - PC Magazine Editors' Choice 2005
        http://mail.yahoo.com
      • Stolzi
        ... Hey, I m interested too. Btw, if anyone doubted it, that story about the Loathly Lady, more typically starring Sir Gawain, is definitely out there in the
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 24, 2005
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          > --- Bonnie Callahan <bonolatm@...> wrote:
          >> I have an angle on Pullman & Narnia & Christianity,
          >> but I want to warn folks that some
          >> may
          >> find it...well...not to their liking. I expect to
          >> take some flak for it if I put it
          >> out there publicly. Perhaps I should send it to
          >> interested persons off-list.

          Hey, I'm interested too.

          Btw, if anyone doubted it, that story about the Loathly Lady, more typically
          starring Sir Gawain, is definitely out there in the early literature. I
          read it as a kid in Bulfinch's MYTHOLOGY,

          http://www.bulfinch.org/tales/chiv05.html

          and Roger Lancelyn Green, friend of CSL, retells it in his own kids' version
          (and a good one it was) of the Arthurian tales.

          In fact, it's the tale Chaucer gives to the Wife of Bath, though with a
          slightly different ending.

          http://www.litrix.com/canterby/cante030.htm

          Diamond Proudbrook
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