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Re: Harry VI

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  • Lezlie
    All I can say is this: I don t like Pete Seeger s expurgated renditions of old folk songs, either. His orgiinals are fine, very sing-alongable -- So, there
    Message 1 of 30 , Oct 13, 2005
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      All I can say is this: I don't like Pete Seeger's expurgated
      renditions of old folk songs, either. His orgiinals are fine, very
      sing-alongable -- So, there you have it. Matter of personal taste, I
      *suppose*.

      There are Other authors I like better, even for youth, but Rowling
      serves a very important purpose in the literacy battle. And, that
      battle, we cannot afford to loose. More HP, I say! Bring them on!

      Lezlie

      --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, "Pauline J. Alama" <PJAlama@e...> wrote:
      >
      > I wouldn't say Rowling's folklore was "off" (by which I suppose you
      > mean "inaccurate"), but that she has decided to do different things
      > with the folklore.
      >
      > As Pete Seeger said of folk music, that's what makes it folk --
      > everyone sings it in their own way.
      >
      > Pauline J. Alama
      > THE EYE OF NIGHT
      >
      > --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, "Lezlie" <lezlie1@z...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hi all- (a bit of a ramble...)
      > > I like Rowling OK-- don't get me wrong. I just wish she'd stop
      > saying
      > > dumb things about *Witches* . As a teacher & parent, the endless
      > > conversations about "pretend witches" gets a bit wearing after a
      > > while... it isn't as if there isn't piles of readily available
      > > information these days. In 2005, there is little excuse to "not
      > know"
      > > any longer. Yeah-- the truth is very boring and fiction is ever so
      > > much more *fun* ...<sniff>... and all of *that*. (I am a *fantasy*
      > fan
      > > after all.)
      > > Some of her folklore is a bit off, too...especially involving
      > elfish
      > > critters. Of course, her knowledge of the occult in general is
      > compete
      > > claptrap, but it's fine for fiction, I suppose. Her world-building
      > > skill is improving, however. Well, I could say all of that about a
      > > *lot* of writers about a *lot* of things.
      > > Rowling tells a good tale. Mostly. But, I haven't gone out and read
      > > the last. I've been reading other people I like a lot better.
      > Personal
      > > taste, you know...
      > >
      > > Not really impressed with the name-thing... not really... a bit too
      > > Dickensonian, IMHO. A little *obvious* in this post modernist era
      > (for
      > > a novel set in modern times with magical twists and turns that
      > is).
      > >
      > > Now, Charles de Lint, in comparison, has his folklore right spot
      > on,
      > > spins magical yarns – if a bit awkward at times – . He shows that
      > he
      > > has done his research – no question—.
      > > On the other hand, Rowling is incredibly successful; I have to hand
      > > her that. And, the kids love her. Mostly harmless (as the cliche
      > has
      > > become) I guess. Lezlie
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, Mike Foster <mafoster@d...> wrote:
      > > > I second Ms. Monk's motion.
      > > >
      > > > Rowling has a nominative (name-giving) gift that exceeds Lewis'
      > and
      > > > perhaps is second only to Tolkien.
      > > >
      > > > Rank rash dismissal of her reminds me of remark made to me by a
      > retired
      > > > ICC earth science prof at an ol' bleeps' breakfast last week:
      > > > "When you started teaching that Tolkien class [in 1978], there
      > were a
      > > > lot of people who were skeptical."
      > > >
      > > > Yeah, well, coprolites to you, chum. Tolkien is literature of
      > the
      > > > finest. Rowling may be nowhere near that level, but she should
      > not be
      > > > sneered away to the toy department, Wendell.
      > > >
      > > > As Pogo the possum used to say:
      > > > "Rowrbazzle!"
      > > >
      > > > Cheers,
      > > > Mike
      > > >
      > > > Walkermonk@a... wrote:
      > > >
      > > > >In a message dated 7/22/2005 9:48:29 AM Central Daylight Time,
      > > > >WendellWag@a... writes:
      > > > >The Harry Potter
      > > > >books are still a teenage-angst series with magic names
      > slapped on
      > > > >everything.
      > > > >This is incorrect. The stories are about the struggle between
      > good
      > > and evil,
      > > > >and how difficult it is to sometimes recognize good and the
      > sacrifices
      > > > >required for doing what is right. The ratio of magic names is
      > quite
      > > low compared to
      > > > >just regular names. And teenage angst? When did angst become the
      > > sole province
      > > > >of teenagers and why is there contempt for teenage feelings? The
      > > situations
      > > > >being confronted by the teenagers in the HP books aren't for the
      > > faint of heart
      > > > >or the immature of character. Do the teenagers handle the
      > situations
      > > > >differently than the adults portrayed? Yes. The teens aren't
      > always
      > > correct either. But
      > > > >they matter, and I don't see anything wrong in that. The HP
      > books
      > > aren't my
      > > > >favorite and I think they have some flaws. But Wendell's
      > > contemptuous one-line
      > > > >dismissal is far below what the books deserve.
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >Incidentally, I read a news story about Rowling recently in
      > which
      > > she said
      > > > >that she never read (or, more precisely, she never finished)
      > either
      > > _The Lord
      > > > >of the Rings_ or _The Chronicles of Narnia_.
      > > > >Well, according to this particular article (which immediately
      > loses
      > > points
      > > > >with me by mentioning Rowling's haircolor), Rowling must have at
      > > least read "The
      > > > >Last Battle." So if she hasn't finished Narnia, then I wonder
      > which
      > > one(s)
      > > > >she left out. This is at odds, btw, with many other interviews
      > and
      > > other
      > > > >statements about Lewis.
      > > > >
      > > > >Grace Monk
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
      > > > >Yahoo! Groups Links
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > >
      >
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