Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [mythsoc] O.W.L.'s in Harry Potter (spoiler at end)

Expand Messages
  • David Bratman
    ... and ... Didn t you read the rest of the chapter? Here s Sam changing his mind when he still thinks it wrong to do so: I can t help it. My place is by Mr.
    Message 1 of 71 , Aug 2, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      At 09:09 AM 8/2/2005 -0400, Grace Monk wrote:

      >Wrong decision? Now you've lost me. If he hadn't taken the ring and left
      >Frodo, what would have happened? The complete failure of the quest and his
      and
      >Frodo's death (at best) at the hand of the orcs. Sam made the right decision.

      Didn't you read the rest of the chapter?

      Here's Sam changing his mind when he still thinks it wrong to do so:

      "I can't help it. My place is by Mr. Frodo. They must understand that --
      Elrond and the Council and the great Lords and Ladies with all their
      wisdom. Their plans have gone wrong. I can't be their Ring-bearer. Not
      without Mr. Frodo."

      And here he is realizing that changing his mind had been the right thing to do:

      "I got it all wrong! I knew I would. Now they've got him, the devils; the
      filth! Never leave your master, never, never: that was my right rule. And
      I knew it in my heart. May I be forgiven! Now I've got to get back to
      him. Somehow, somehow!"


      >Hard as it is to believe, I do know people who haven't finished LOTR.

      Those people are irrelevant. They must not have liked LOTR very much. The
      people whose existence I doubt are those who liked "The Two Towers" but
      didn't go on to "The Return of the King". I was contrasting these
      non-existent people with the testimony of those who liked HP2 and didn't
      feel like going on to HP3. The point was that HP3 is a sequel, a different
      (albeit closely connected) tale, whereas RK finishes a single story.


      >But I still
      >think my argument using the Lord Peter books as an example holds.

      I wasn't going to respond to that, because I thought it beside the point.
      But the reason I think it beside the point is that most mystery series are
      not series in the same sense as fantasy series. For one thing, they don't
      have to be read in order to make sense. (You didn't.)* And even if the
      detective changes and grows and things happen to him (as is the case with
      Lord Peter) the stories are not primarily about the detective as a
      character but about his cases.

      *Most public librarians are mystery-readers. And because of that, they see
      nothing wrong, if budget and availability are limited, with buying only
      scattered volumes of various series. This is not a problem with mysteries.
      The problem is that they also apply this to fantasy. And if you have,
      say, just volumes 2 and 4 of, say, the Chronicles of Amber, this is just
      not going to help the readers very much.



      >To me, HP1 isn't a complete story. There's an end to the book, but it's for
      >me an unsatisfactory ending and not the end to the story.

      Lots of books have unsatisfactory or incomplete endings. Some of them have
      sequels, some don't. Some that do have sequels were not originally
      expected to.



      HARRY POTTER SPOILER FOLLOWS!
      HARRY POTTER SPOILER FOLLOWS!
      HARRY POTTER SPOILER FOLLOWS!
      HARRY POTTER SPOILER FOLLOWS!
      HARRY POTTER SPOILER FOLLOWS!


      >Nor do I think that the birdbath of doom scene futile.

      Correct me if I misunderstood the plot here. But I thought Dumbledore
      drank the Birdbath of Doom so that he could get at one of Voldemort's
      little soul-boxes (I forget what they're called). But then it turned out
      that this soul-box was a fake. The effort didn't accomplish anything, and
      it seems to have had some connection (unclear to me) with getting
      Dumbledore killed. The word in my dictionary to describe this is "futile".

      DB
    • Larry Swain
      ONe tidbit I didn t see mentioned in the various takes on the theory: at the end Harry rather considers getting Snape as a possible by-product, but isn t
      Message 71 of 71 , Aug 14, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        ONe tidbit I didn't see mentioned in the various takes on the theory: at the end Harry rather considers "getting Snape" as a possible by-product, but isn't overly concerned with Snape or Malfoy. One could counter that he is focused on Voldemort, but I'm not sure I buy that as just putting Snape out of mind.

        --
        _______________________________________________
        Surf the Web in a faster, safer and easier way:
        Download Opera 8 at http://www.opera.com

        Powered by Outblaze
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.