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Re: [mythsoc] Re: O.W.L.'s in Harry Potter

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  • Walkermonk@aol.com
    In a message dated 8/1/2005 11:22:29 PM Central Daylight Time, dbratman@earthlink.net writes: OK, this is where you lose me. To me, the response to a good
    Message 1 of 71 , Aug 1, 2005
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      In a message dated 8/1/2005 11:22:29 PM Central Daylight Time,
      dbratman@... writes:
      OK, this is where you lose me. To me, the response to a good book does not
      include the "desire to pursue the story further." When you read LOTR, does
      it leave you burning with desire to read the Further Adventures of Mayor
      Sam? A good book is its own reward. When I read a good book, the desire
      it leaves me with is the desire to read it again sometime.
      --------

      Yes, good books are their own reward! But reading "The Fellowship" did make
      me want to pick up "Two Towers" (amazingly, I've met people who *didn't* feel
      that way -- the freaks. But I digress).

      To me, HP Books #1 and #2 are unfinished stories. I thought that there was
      too much unresolved for either to be considered complete. Yet I was not moved to
      pick up the #3 because I considered the first two to be too . . . light. The
      books weren't quite good enough on their own. Cotton candy tastes fine for a
      few bites. It doesn't make me want to buy more. At least not right away. And
      "Strong Poison" directly led me to wanting to read "Nine Tailors" and "Gaudy
      Night" and "Busman's Honeymoon" and all the other Lord Peter books and short
      stories. Not because I didn't think "Strong Poison" was it's own reward but
      because I loved it so much and I wanted to know what else happened with these
      wonderful characters.

      And I'm huge on rereading books I love. Of course!

      I agree that #5 was way too long, but I don't think the same way about #6.

      Grace Monk


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Larry Swain
      ONe tidbit I didn t see mentioned in the various takes on the theory: at the end Harry rather considers getting Snape as a possible by-product, but isn t
      Message 71 of 71 , Aug 14, 2005
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        ONe tidbit I didn't see mentioned in the various takes on the theory: at the end Harry rather considers "getting Snape" as a possible by-product, but isn't overly concerned with Snape or Malfoy. One could counter that he is focused on Voldemort, but I'm not sure I buy that as just putting Snape out of mind.

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