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Re: [mythsoc] 4, 5 & 6 graders...suggestions for short stories?

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  • Margaret Dean
    ... And here I thought that might have been intentional -- imitating a colloquial, countrified pronunciation that would be very much in keeping with the story.
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 2, 2005
      Mike Foster wrote:
      >
      > Oops, Latin, not Lating. Truly, they could learn lating too if they get
      > behind on the readings.
      >
      > Another finger-fumble etched in cybers due to the 'Ready,' 'FIRE!',
      > 'Aim' nature of E-mail that makes some of these exchanges so very, uh,
      > lively.

      And here I thought that might have been intentional -- imitating
      a colloquial, countrified pronunciation that would be very much
      in keeping with the story. :)


      --Margaret Dean
      <margdean@...>
    • Mike Foster
      Thanks for thinking, however briefly, that I m that subtle & clever. ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 2, 2005
        Thanks for thinking, however briefly, that I'm that subtle & clever.

        Margaret Dean wrote:

        >Mike Foster wrote:
        >
        >
        >>Oops, Latin, not Lating. Truly, they could learn lating too if they get
        >>behind on the readings.
        >>
        >>Another finger-fumble etched in cybers due to the 'Ready,' 'FIRE!',
        >>'Aim' nature of E-mail that makes some of these exchanges so very, uh,
        >>lively.
        >>
        >>
        >
        >And here I thought that might have been intentional -- imitating
        >a colloquial, countrified pronunciation that would be very much
        >in keeping with the story. :)
        >
        >
        >--Margaret Dean
        > <margdean@...>
        >
        >
        >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
        >Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Lezlie
        I *am* having fun with it! I would like to back into the college class room by fall-- have an interview this month -- but, this group is a good bunch. Very
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 3, 2005
          I *am* having fun with it! I would like to back into the college class
          room by fall-- have an interview this month -- but, this group is a
          good bunch. Very gifted students, some already know "Lating". Would
          anyone like me to post the course syllabus for inspiration or
          whatever? Or, be willing to send a pithy & wise note as a "real writer
          of fantasy" to be shared with the class? Lezlie





          --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, Mike Foster <mafoster@d...> wrote:
          > If a short Tolkien work is to be used, perhaps Farmer Giles of Ham wd.
          > be a better choice for young readers.
          >
          > Rich with memorable characters, including a dog and a dragon, it is
          also
          > a microcosmic version of the classic fairy tale quest, with The Monster
          > Defeated, Rags to Riches etc. in general and Tolkien's hobbit works in
          > particular. John Rateliff's idea of Tolkien's "autoplagiarism" is
          > certainly illustrated here.
          >
          > It's a good starting point for Tolkien's fiction--so I've used it in my
          > college class--and young readers who like this will probably ready to
          > move on to the adventures of Bilbo.and Frodo. Shd. be great fun to
          read
          > bits aloud--the first encounter with Chrysophylax, the second as well,
          > Giles and the King at the bridge &c. And they'll learn a bit of
          Lating, too.
          >
          > Smith, on the other hand, is not as cheery with its "presage of
          > bereavement." More adult, it's also rather less pleasant, with the
          > nasty fate of Nokes souring the ending.
          >
          > Have fun with it & the students will, too.
          >
          > Cheers,
          > Mike
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > juliet@f... wrote:
          >
          > >On Fri, Jul 01, 2005 at 01:42:26PM -0700, lezlie1@z... wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > >>Lloyd Alexander is definately on the list. Although, I want to
          stick with
          > >>shorts, it's only a three week class.
          > >>
          > >>
          > >
          > >We have a volume of short stories by Lloyd Alexander entitled _The
          Foundling_.
          > >I'm not sure it's his best work, but it's certainly not bad.
          > >
          > >George MacDonald has some short stories that might be appropriate.
          The older
          > >language might be a little tougher for some kids, but it'd be good
          for them,
          > >too ;) I recommend _The Light Princess_, which has been printed
          alone with
          > >illustrations by Maurice Sendak, and there's also a Puffin volume
          of about a
          > >dozen of his fairy tales.
          > >
          > >Patricia McKillip has a novella called _The Throme of the Errill of
          Sherrill_
          > >which was published with a short story called _The Harrowing of the
          Dragon
          > >of Hoarsbreath_, and I've read them to my kids with pretty good
          effect. She
          > >also has a novella _The Changeling Sea_ which would be appropriate
          for kids.
          > >
          > >Tolkien's _Smith of Wootton Major_ would be a good choice, I think,
          if _The
          > >Hobbit_ is too long. And you should have them read at least an
          excerpt from
          > >the Narnia books.
          > >
          > >Those are the things I can think of off the top of my head. I'd
          also look at
          > >http://www.mythsoc.org/MFAnoms.html which is the list of past
          Mythopoeic
          > >Fantasy Awards and nominations. Patricia Wrede and Jane Yolen are
          two authors
          > >from that list that I'd recommend.
          > >
          > >I'd love to hear what you come up with for a syllabus.
          > >
          > >Julie
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
          > >Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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