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Re: [mythsoc] 4, 5 & 6 graders...suggestions for short stories?

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  • Mike Foster
    If a short Tolkien work is to be used, perhaps Farmer Giles of Ham wd. be a better choice for young readers. Rich with memorable characters, including a dog
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 2, 2005
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      If a short Tolkien work is to be used, perhaps Farmer Giles of Ham wd.
      be a better choice for young readers.

      Rich with memorable characters, including a dog and a dragon, it is also
      a microcosmic version of the classic fairy tale quest, with The Monster
      Defeated, Rags to Riches etc. in general and Tolkien's hobbit works in
      particular. John Rateliff's idea of Tolkien's "autoplagiarism" is
      certainly illustrated here.

      It's a good starting point for Tolkien's fiction--so I've used it in my
      college class--and young readers who like this will probably ready to
      move on to the adventures of Bilbo.and Frodo. Shd. be great fun to read
      bits aloud--the first encounter with Chrysophylax, the second as well,
      Giles and the King at the bridge &c. And they'll learn a bit of Lating, too.

      Smith, on the other hand, is not as cheery with its "presage of
      bereavement." More adult, it's also rather less pleasant, with the
      nasty fate of Nokes souring the ending.

      Have fun with it & the students will, too.

      Cheers,
      Mike





      juliet@... wrote:

      >On Fri, Jul 01, 2005 at 01:42:26PM -0700, lezlie1@... wrote:
      >
      >
      >>Lloyd Alexander is definately on the list. Although, I want to stick with
      >>shorts, it's only a three week class.
      >>
      >>
      >
      >We have a volume of short stories by Lloyd Alexander entitled _The Foundling_.
      >I'm not sure it's his best work, but it's certainly not bad.
      >
      >George MacDonald has some short stories that might be appropriate. The older
      >language might be a little tougher for some kids, but it'd be good for them,
      >too ;) I recommend _The Light Princess_, which has been printed alone with
      >illustrations by Maurice Sendak, and there's also a Puffin volume of about a
      >dozen of his fairy tales.
      >
      >Patricia McKillip has a novella called _The Throme of the Errill of Sherrill_
      >which was published with a short story called _The Harrowing of the Dragon
      >of Hoarsbreath_, and I've read them to my kids with pretty good effect. She
      >also has a novella _The Changeling Sea_ which would be appropriate for kids.
      >
      >Tolkien's _Smith of Wootton Major_ would be a good choice, I think, if _The
      >Hobbit_ is too long. And you should have them read at least an excerpt from
      >the Narnia books.
      >
      >Those are the things I can think of off the top of my head. I'd also look at
      >http://www.mythsoc.org/MFAnoms.html which is the list of past Mythopoeic
      >Fantasy Awards and nominations. Patricia Wrede and Jane Yolen are two authors
      >from that list that I'd recommend.
      >
      >I'd love to hear what you come up with for a syllabus.
      >
      >Julie
      >
      >
      >
      >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
      >Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Mike Foster
      Oops, Latin, not Lating. Truly, they could learn lating too if they get behind on the readings. Another finger-fumble etched in cybers due to the Ready,
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 2, 2005
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        Oops, Latin, not Lating. Truly, they could learn lating too if they get
        behind on the readings.

        Another finger-fumble etched in cybers due to the 'Ready,' 'FIRE!',
        'Aim' nature of E-mail that makes some of these exchanges so very, uh,
        lively.

        Mike

        juliet@... wrote:

        >On Fri, Jul 01, 2005 at 01:42:26PM -0700, lezlie1@... wrote:
        >
        >
        >>Lloyd Alexander is definately on the list. Although, I want to stick with
        >>shorts, it's only a three week class.
        >>
        >>
        >
        >We have a volume of short stories by Lloyd Alexander entitled _The Foundling_.
        >I'm not sure it's his best work, but it's certainly not bad.
        >
        >George MacDonald has some short stories that might be appropriate. The older
        >language might be a little tougher for some kids, but it'd be good for them,
        >too ;) I recommend _The Light Princess_, which has been printed alone with
        >illustrations by Maurice Sendak, and there's also a Puffin volume of about a
        >dozen of his fairy tales.
        >
        >Patricia McKillip has a novella called _The Throme of the Errill of Sherrill_
        >which was published with a short story called _The Harrowing of the Dragon
        >of Hoarsbreath_, and I've read them to my kids with pretty good effect. She
        >also has a novella _The Changeling Sea_ which would be appropriate for kids.
        >
        >Tolkien's _Smith of Wootton Major_ would be a good choice, I think, if _The
        >Hobbit_ is too long. And you should have them read at least an excerpt from
        >the Narnia books.
        >
        >Those are the things I can think of off the top of my head. I'd also look at
        >http://www.mythsoc.org/MFAnoms.html which is the list of past Mythopoeic
        >Fantasy Awards and nominations. Patricia Wrede and Jane Yolen are two authors
        >from that list that I'd recommend.
        >
        >I'd love to hear what you come up with for a syllabus.
        >
        >Julie
        >
        >
        >
        >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
        >Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Margaret Dean
        ... And here I thought that might have been intentional -- imitating a colloquial, countrified pronunciation that would be very much in keeping with the story.
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 2, 2005
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          Mike Foster wrote:
          >
          > Oops, Latin, not Lating. Truly, they could learn lating too if they get
          > behind on the readings.
          >
          > Another finger-fumble etched in cybers due to the 'Ready,' 'FIRE!',
          > 'Aim' nature of E-mail that makes some of these exchanges so very, uh,
          > lively.

          And here I thought that might have been intentional -- imitating
          a colloquial, countrified pronunciation that would be very much
          in keeping with the story. :)


          --Margaret Dean
          <margdean@...>
        • Mike Foster
          Thanks for thinking, however briefly, that I m that subtle & clever. ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 9 , Jul 2, 2005
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            Thanks for thinking, however briefly, that I'm that subtle & clever.

            Margaret Dean wrote:

            >Mike Foster wrote:
            >
            >
            >>Oops, Latin, not Lating. Truly, they could learn lating too if they get
            >>behind on the readings.
            >>
            >>Another finger-fumble etched in cybers due to the 'Ready,' 'FIRE!',
            >>'Aim' nature of E-mail that makes some of these exchanges so very, uh,
            >>lively.
            >>
            >>
            >
            >And here I thought that might have been intentional -- imitating
            >a colloquial, countrified pronunciation that would be very much
            >in keeping with the story. :)
            >
            >
            >--Margaret Dean
            > <margdean@...>
            >
            >
            >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
            >Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Lezlie
            I *am* having fun with it! I would like to back into the college class room by fall-- have an interview this month -- but, this group is a good bunch. Very
            Message 5 of 9 , Jul 3, 2005
            • 0 Attachment
              I *am* having fun with it! I would like to back into the college class
              room by fall-- have an interview this month -- but, this group is a
              good bunch. Very gifted students, some already know "Lating". Would
              anyone like me to post the course syllabus for inspiration or
              whatever? Or, be willing to send a pithy & wise note as a "real writer
              of fantasy" to be shared with the class? Lezlie





              --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, Mike Foster <mafoster@d...> wrote:
              > If a short Tolkien work is to be used, perhaps Farmer Giles of Ham wd.
              > be a better choice for young readers.
              >
              > Rich with memorable characters, including a dog and a dragon, it is
              also
              > a microcosmic version of the classic fairy tale quest, with The Monster
              > Defeated, Rags to Riches etc. in general and Tolkien's hobbit works in
              > particular. John Rateliff's idea of Tolkien's "autoplagiarism" is
              > certainly illustrated here.
              >
              > It's a good starting point for Tolkien's fiction--so I've used it in my
              > college class--and young readers who like this will probably ready to
              > move on to the adventures of Bilbo.and Frodo. Shd. be great fun to
              read
              > bits aloud--the first encounter with Chrysophylax, the second as well,
              > Giles and the King at the bridge &c. And they'll learn a bit of
              Lating, too.
              >
              > Smith, on the other hand, is not as cheery with its "presage of
              > bereavement." More adult, it's also rather less pleasant, with the
              > nasty fate of Nokes souring the ending.
              >
              > Have fun with it & the students will, too.
              >
              > Cheers,
              > Mike
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > juliet@f... wrote:
              >
              > >On Fri, Jul 01, 2005 at 01:42:26PM -0700, lezlie1@z... wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > >>Lloyd Alexander is definately on the list. Although, I want to
              stick with
              > >>shorts, it's only a three week class.
              > >>
              > >>
              > >
              > >We have a volume of short stories by Lloyd Alexander entitled _The
              Foundling_.
              > >I'm not sure it's his best work, but it's certainly not bad.
              > >
              > >George MacDonald has some short stories that might be appropriate.
              The older
              > >language might be a little tougher for some kids, but it'd be good
              for them,
              > >too ;) I recommend _The Light Princess_, which has been printed
              alone with
              > >illustrations by Maurice Sendak, and there's also a Puffin volume
              of about a
              > >dozen of his fairy tales.
              > >
              > >Patricia McKillip has a novella called _The Throme of the Errill of
              Sherrill_
              > >which was published with a short story called _The Harrowing of the
              Dragon
              > >of Hoarsbreath_, and I've read them to my kids with pretty good
              effect. She
              > >also has a novella _The Changeling Sea_ which would be appropriate
              for kids.
              > >
              > >Tolkien's _Smith of Wootton Major_ would be a good choice, I think,
              if _The
              > >Hobbit_ is too long. And you should have them read at least an
              excerpt from
              > >the Narnia books.
              > >
              > >Those are the things I can think of off the top of my head. I'd
              also look at
              > >http://www.mythsoc.org/MFAnoms.html which is the list of past
              Mythopoeic
              > >Fantasy Awards and nominations. Patricia Wrede and Jane Yolen are
              two authors
              > >from that list that I'd recommend.
              > >
              > >I'd love to hear what you come up with for a syllabus.
              > >
              > >Julie
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
              > >Yahoo! Groups Links
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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