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Re: Fan fiction

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  • ftl_publications
    ... years? ... Currently, as I understand it, it s death plus 75 years. Joan Marie Verba
    Message 1 of 46 , Jun 29, 2005
      ---"Croft, Janet B." <jbcroft@o...> wrote:
      > Can
      > there be a time when it's okay -- say, after the author is dead? But
      > that would allow Tolkien fanfic. Dead a hundred years, a thousand
      years?
      > Is fiction based on Homer okay? If not, we'll have to toss the Aeneid,
      > won't we? Where does she want to draw the dividing line between fanfic
      > and something like Ros&Guil -- or does she? What's the statute of
      > limitations here?

      Currently, as I understand it, it's death plus 75 years.

      Joan Marie Verba
    • Lezlie
      ... because they re major sources in Old Norse, a ... where the ... Of course, I had momentarily forgotten... ! :) ... Ahhh... Although those are precisly the
      Message 46 of 46 , Aug 1 10:06 AM
        --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, David Bratman <dbratman@e...> wrote:
        > At 01:52 AM 7/20/2005 +0000, Lezlie wrote:
        because they're major sources in Old Norse, a
        > language he taught, and because he used them as sources (they're
        where the
        > dwarf-names came from).

        Of course, I had momentarily forgotten... ! :)

        > >I also disagree that "all fiction is fan fiction". There is a deeper,
        > >more complex conversation going in between authors, readers and later
        > >generation writers than what seems to be the norm in "fan-fic."
        >
        > Totally apart from questions of quality and subtlety,

        Ahhh... Although those are precisly the qualities we seek in reading
        and in crafting our fiction. Whether a piece has literary quality or
        not, BTW, was beside my point.


        there is also a
        > difference between crafting a work in response to an earlier work
        and being
        > inspired by it, and actually borrowing its concrete setting or
        retelling it
        > openly. This is a difference in kind, not necessarily a difference in
        > literary value.

        Also beside my point. What I was talking about is something different--

        BTW: Have you read Stallybrass & White on this subject? Very
        interesting stuff and a killer title: "The Politics and Poetics of
        Transgression" - Lezlie
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