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Re: Labyrinth

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  • Katie Glick
    ... Oh, without question, it s bad. In fact, I absolutely hate the end, where all the muppets come back and start dancing around. It s completely stupid. My
    Message 1 of 1 , May 13, 2005
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      David Bratman wrote:

      >
      > I remember that film. I thought it was really bad. I remember two things
      > about it: the way that, when David Bowie started singing, the direction
      > style suddenly changed from "motion picture" to "music video" and then back
      > again when he stopped; and the way that, over the closing credits, all the
      > characters got together and boogied.

      Oh, without question, it's bad. In fact, I absolutely hate the end,
      where all the muppets come back and start dancing around. It's
      completely stupid. My love for the movie is entirely based on
      nostalgia and my original love for the movie was based entirely on the
      fact of my love for David Bowie and ... more importantly, on the fact
      that at the time it came out, I was 11.

      Being 11, the "music video" part didn't bother me because I was more
      concerned with coveting Jennifer Connelly's dress, and wishing a
      Goblin King would want to kidnap me. Only if he looked like David
      Bowie, though.

      Carl Hofstetter wrote:

      > > it seems to be pretty similar to "Labyrinth," which they did
      > > in the 80s. (Girl discontented with her life finds herself in a
      > > strange world where she must quest to find whatever it is that will
      > > get her home again).
      >
      > Which sounds like _The Wizard of Oz_. Which sounds like _Alice in
      > Wonderland_.
      >

      Without a doubt, and of course there are tons of stories now that
      follow this basic formula in some way or other ... it's kind of nice,
      actually, that women get their own "hero's journey" archetypal
      storyline. And since Joseph Campbell has come up, I wonder where
      Dorothy and Alice fit into his "hero" stuff? I haven't actually read
      Joseph Campbell, although I have seen the PBS show ... I've always
      meant to read it. Is being a "hero" in Campbell's view dependent on
      being a man?

      -kt
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