Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [mythsoc] Germaine Greer has at Tolkien again...

Expand Messages
  • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
    I m new to this subject. What s her axe she s grinding? Sheesh. Lizzie Elizabeth Apgar Triano lizziewriter@earthlink.net amor vincit omnia
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 24, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      I'm new to this subject. What's her axe she's grinding? Sheesh.

      Lizzie

      Elizabeth Apgar Triano
      lizziewriter@...
      amor vincit omnia
      www.lizziewriter.com
      www.danburymineralogicalsociety.org


      > [Original Message]
      > From: Stolzi <Stolzi@...>
      > To: Mythopoeic Society <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
      > Date: 4/24/2005 6:10:23 PM
      > Subject: [mythsoc] Germaine Greer has at Tolkien again...
      >
      >
      > I'm not sure what she's driving at, precisely, in this Shakespeare-themed
      > article for THE SPECTATOR (requires registration) but it's somewhat
      > interesting. The only Tolkien passage is this:
      >
      > " Middle Earth is the latest reincarnation of the cherished fantasy of
      > Merrie England, which is partly why The Lord of the Rings is voted the
      > nation's favourite work of fiction in poll after poll. Tolkien's nonsense
      > encourages the English to believe that they are who they think they are,
      as
      > distinct from who they really are. They think they are more reasonable,
      > fair, friendly and reliable than any other people on the planet, when they
      > have no more reason for thinking so than for believing in St George or his
      > dragon."
      >
      > http://www.spectator.co.uk/article.php?id=6003&page=1
      >
      > Diamond Proudbrook
      >
    • jamcconney@aol.com
      Well yes, so what? Every nation probably has an image of itself (Americans see themselves as standing undaunted on the ramparts of freedom) and what s wrong
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 25, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Well yes, so what? Every nation probably has an image of itself (Americans
        see themselves as standing undaunted on the ramparts of freedom) and what's
        wrong with that? As long as it's a good image it gives the natives of whatever
        country a noble ideal to live up to, then even though not every citizen can
        live up to the ideal every time, it will still shape his/her responses to the
        world. If the English think of themselves as reasonable and fair, then that's
        a good thing. Would the rest of the world prefer that they thought
        themselves unreasonable and unfair and did their best to live up to it?

        Anne


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • dianejoy@earthlink.net
        Her axe is feminism, radical socialist variety. ? (Christine Hoff Summer s *Who Stole Feminism* is an excellent summary of events in the 80s and 90s, btw,
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 26, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          Her axe is feminism, radical socialist variety. ? (Christine Hoff
          Summer's *Who Stole Feminism* is an excellent summary of events in the 80s
          and 90s, btw, along w/ Joan Kennedy Taylor's *Individualist Faminism
          Revisited,* a great historical summary of how things went wrong.)

          But truly, does anyone actually pay attention to Germaine Greer anymore? I
          also hear Andrea Dworkin just died recently, too. Frankly, I think Andre
          Norton did more for feminism than either. ---djb

          Original Message:
          -----------------
          From: Elizabeth Apgar Triano lizziewriter@...
          Date: Sun, 24 Apr 2005 19:05:36 -0400
          To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [mythsoc] Germaine Greer has at Tolkien again...




          I'm new to this subject. What's her axe she's grinding? Sheesh.

          Lizzie

          Elizabeth Apgar Triano
          lizziewriter@...
          amor vincit omnia
          www.lizziewriter.com
          www.danburymineralogicalsociety.org


          > [Original Message]
          > From: Stolzi <Stolzi@...>
          > To: Mythopoeic Society <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
          > Date: 4/24/2005 6:10:23 PM
          > Subject: [mythsoc] Germaine Greer has at Tolkien again...
          >
          >
          > I'm not sure what she's driving at, precisely, in this Shakespeare-themed
          > article for THE SPECTATOR (requires registration) but it's somewhat
          > interesting. The only Tolkien passage is this:
          >
          > " Middle Earth is the latest reincarnation of the cherished fantasy of
          > Merrie England, which is partly why The Lord of the Rings is voted the
          > nation's favourite work of fiction in poll after poll. Tolkien's nonsense
          > encourages the English to believe that they are who they think they are,
          as
          > distinct from who they really are. They think they are more reasonable,
          > fair, friendly and reliable than any other people on the planet, when they
          > have no more reason for thinking so than for believing in St George or his
          > dragon."
          >
          > http://www.spectator.co.uk/article.php?id=6003&page=1
          >
          > Diamond Proudbrook
          >








          The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
          Yahoo! Groups Links








          --------------------------------------------------------------------
          mail2web - Check your email from the web at
          http://mail2web.com/ .
        • WendellWag@aol.com
          Greer s ax is that she doesn t like Tolkien and therefore no one else can like Tolkien for a purely literary reason. She apparently considers herself the
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 26, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            Greer's ax is that she doesn't like Tolkien and therefore no one else can
            like Tolkien for a purely literary reason. She apparently considers herself
            the ultimate arbiter of literary taste and can't believe that other people
            might differ so greatly from her tastes. The popularity of Tolkien must
            therefore be explained as being for some non-literary reason.

            Wendell Wagner


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.