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Re: Digest Number 35

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  • Diane Baker
    ... That would sure be true; I d guess that most Christians would believe in the Imago Dei, making us essentialists. We are merely saying that humanity is
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 4, 1999
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      Nagy Gergely wrote:
      >
      > From: Nagy Gergely <lamorak@....u-szeged.hu>
      >
      > >
      > > Nagy, thank you for your prompt return mail. It helped. Tolkien was a
      > > quintessential essentialist, wasn't he -- as he believed in the Imago Dei?
      > > Maria T.

      That would sure be true; I'd guess that most Christians would believe in
      the Imago Dei, making us "essentialists." We are merely saying that
      humanity is not "plastic," and that change does not easily come from the
      outside but from the inside. What these post-modern critics have
      against this notion, I can't quite understand, unless they simply
      question the whole notion of any essential truth or reality, and that
      all is perception.

      > Yes indeed he was, probably that's the thing because of which I like him most. I don't want to deny this or circumnavigate this theoretically, kind of 'apologising' for him in today's theoretical context; rather, to expand, modify or, if need be, subvert that context to include such texts
      > and to be able to deal with them. It was even yesterday that we have been talking of Tolkien's work as a 'simulacrum', or as close to it as any author has ever come, and that's highly unpopular a conception nowadays.

      Tolkien himself spoke of his own work as a "sub-creation." As a
      brilliant literary critic (you may be familiar with his articles on
      Beowulf, most esp. "The Monsters and the Critics"), he certainly could
      look at his own work and discuss what went into its formation. His "On
      Fairy Stories" gives a good beginning.

      > Anyway, I'm glad we are getting on. [sorry, but Gergely is the first name, I forget to mention this every time I join a new list and consequently have everybody calling me Nagy...]

      I'm afraid I thought of you as Nagy rather than Gergely. How is it
      pronounced? We're very wedded to word order for names. What do you
      prefer to be called? We also do a lot of nicknames here; do you have
      one? ---djb
      > G
    • LeslieJ55@xxx.xxx
      In a message dated 3/4/99 6:11:58 AM Eastern Standard Time, ... Nagy, can you possibly put this into Plain English? I am very educated, but you have lost me
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 4, 1999
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        In a message dated 3/4/99 6:11:58 AM Eastern Standard Time,
        lamorak@....u-szeged.hu writes:

        > es indeed he was, probably that's the thing because of which I like him
        > most. I don't want to deny this or circumnavigate this theoretically, kind
        > of 'apologising' for him in today's theoretical context; rather, to
        > expand, modify or, if need be, subvert that context to include such texts
        > and to be able to deal with them. It was even yesterday

        Nagy,
        can you possibly put this into Plain English? I am very educated, but you have
        lost me entirely.

        Leslie
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