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Re: [mythsoc] Opoponax

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  • Christine Howlett
    Thank you for explaining this to me! I am seriously allergic to poison ivy, and I used to have a minor reaction to mangoes - not enough to keep me from eating
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 16, 2005
      Thank you for explaining this to me! I am seriously allergic to poison ivy,
      and I used to have a minor reaction to mangoes - not enough to keep me from
      eating the rare one I could afford! They are getting cheaper though, and I
      got quite a bargain a few months ago. Unfortunately that bargain gave me
      quite a rash on my face. The ones in Africa never bothered me at all
      though, and I was eating them hand over fist. They're also great cooked
      with chicken and a little cinnamon, Persian-style.
      Christine
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Bonnie Callahan" <bonolatm@...>
      To: <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, March 14, 2005 3:41 AM
      Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Opoponax


      >
      > Hi Diamond: & all naturalists:
      > Interestingly, mangoes are in the same family as Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac,
      > as well as cashews. The "kerosene" odor may be partly caused by urushiol,
      the
      > oil that causes allergic reactions. Many mangoes don't have enough to
      affect
      > me,
      > but one time I ate a loaded one in Manila and the entire lower half of my
      face
      > was
      > blisterland! I ADORE mangoes. Go great with nutmeg!
      >
      > Where did you live that grew mangoes?
      >
      > Opoponax will be my word for the Day.
      >
      > Bonnie
      >
      > Stolzi wrote:
      >
      > > " Opopanax, a synthetic that he had expected to produce a resinous
      smell,
      > > ended up evoking mushrooms "
      > >
      > > This is from a (quite fascinating) article about how perfumes are
      developed.
      > > It is also the ONLY place I ever ran across the word "opoponax" other
      than
      > > in C.S. Lewis' "Marching Song for Dwarves."
      > >
      > > http://www.newyorker.com/fact/content/index.ssf?050314fa_fact
      > >
      > > My friend Ruby would like the part about an Egypt-themed perfume
      smelling of
      > > green mangoes... she is a total devotee of mango ice cream, which is
      made
      > > however from the ripe, rather peach-flavored fruit.
      > >
      > > I used to live in a mango-growing country, and we had pies from green
      > > mangoes which tasted like apple pie and from ripe mangoes which tasted
      like
      > > peach pie. The article is right when it associates green mangoes with
      > > acetone; even the ripe ones can give the eater a touch of "kerosene
      flavor."
      > >
      > > Diamond Proudbrook
      > >
      > >
      > > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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