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Brad Strickland & John Bellairs

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  • David Lenander
    Someone mentioned the way that Brad Strickland had continued the various series that Bellairs used to write, especially the Lewis Barnavelt/Rose Rita series.
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 13, 2005
      Someone mentioned the way that Brad Strickland had continued the
      various series that Bellairs used to write, especially the "Lewis
      Barnavelt/Rose Rita" series. In what appears to be the most recent,
      _The Whistle, the Grave, and the Ghost_, there is a fun moment where
      Lewis glances at the magic stained glass window, which changes its
      picture on a regular basis: "Tonight it showed a tall wizard standing
      in front of a strange arched bridge, with stone sculptures like giant
      chess pieces at its corners. The magician was flinging a handful of
      playing cards through the air towards the bridge." (p.83).

      Because of the comment the other day, I thought to look for any new
      additions to the Bellairs series and found this one when I was at the
      public library. It's not even one of Strickland's best, but I figured
      that even those not inclined to read the Strickland volumes might
      appreciate this homage.
      On Mar 13, 2005, at 9:27 AM, mythsoc@yahoogroups.com wrote:

      >
      >
      > There are 3 messages in this issue.
      >
      > Topics in this digest:
      >
      > 1. Re: wonderful and draggy?
      > From: WendellWag@...
      > 2. Re: Re: Mythopoesis (was Questions on the ROTK EE)
      > From: WendellWag@...
      > 3. Re: Mythopoesis (was Questions on the ROTK EE)
      > From: "Steve" <sverba@...>
      >
      >
      > _______________________________________________________________________
      > _
      > _______________________________________________________________________
      > _
      >
      > Message: 1
      > Date: Sat, 12 Mar 2005 23:55:26 EST
      > From: WendellWag@...
      > Subject: Re: wonderful and draggy?
      >
      >
      > In a message dated 3/9/2005 7:41:13 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
      > carnimiriel@... writes:
      >
      > I was six the first time I read it, so I won't even go into
      > some of the somewhat bizzare things I thought at the first reading
      > that
      > were gradually corrected through years of repeated reading.
      >
      >
      > Does anyone have any good stories about the things in Tolkien (or any
      > of the
      > other authors we regularly discuss) that they didn't understand until
      > much
      > later? Here's my story: When I first read _The Lord of the Rings_
      > when I was
      > 17, I didn't understand what was meant by the musical crackers
      > mentioned in
      > the birthday party chapter in _The Fellowship of the Ring_. I
      > presumed that
      > these were some kind of crisp cookies (maybe like fortune cookies)
      > shaped
      > like flutes or some such so that one could play a tune by blowing into
      > them.
      >
      > It wasn't till I was 35 and spending my first Christmas in England
      > that I
      > finally realized that they were something like Christmas crackers.
      > These are
      > cylinders of cardboard, covered with colorful foil, from which a toy,
      > a paper
      > crown, and a slip of paper with a joke on it come flying out when
      > it's pulled
      > apart with a loud snap. These are traditionally opened by everyone at
      > Christmas dinner in the U.K. Everyone reads the stupid jokes (and
      > they are
      > stupid, in general), plays a little bit with the cheap plastic toy,
      > and wears the
      > crown for the rest of the meal. So I realized then that Tolkien
      > meant musical
      > crackers to be crackers with small musical instruments in them.
      >
      > So another 17 years go by and as I was writing this post, I suddenly
      > wondered if there actually were musical crackers. I just did some
      > Googling and I
      > find that there are indeed musical crackers. It appears that all
      > they have in
      > them are whistles though. In each of a set of eight crackers there
      > will be
      > whistles for eight different tones so tunes can be played only by
      > eight people
      > working together.
      >
      > Wendell Wagner
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > _______________________________________________________________________
      > _
      > _______________________________________________________________________
      > _
      >
      > Message: 2
      > Date: Sun, 13 Mar 2005 01:36:24 EST
      > From: WendellWag@...
      > Subject: Re: Re: Mythopoesis (was Questions on the ROTK EE)
      >
      >
      > In a message dated 3/9/2005 10:09:54 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
      > sverba@... writes:
      >
      >> Hmm...I think one relevant explanation of what makes some works of
      >> fantasy
      > more
      >> mythopoeic than others might involve their degree of
      > "transvaluation"...that is, the degree to
      >> which "rules and values of the...various levels of culture are
      >> turned back
      > into or
      >> reevaluatioed"...in the story...paraphrasing from a nice study "The
      > Semiotics of Myth" by
      >> James Liszka...
      >
      > I have no idea what this mean or even if it means anything. Could you
      > give
      > us an example what this means? In what way, for instance, are the
      > rules and
      > values of various levels of culture re-evaluated in _The Lord of the
      > Rings_?
      > I hope I've asked this right, but your sentence was so confusing that
      > I had
      > problems even asking a question about it.
      >
      > Wendell Wagner
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > _______________________________________________________________________
      > _
      > _______________________________________________________________________
      > _
      >
      > Message: 3
      > Date: Sun, 13 Mar 2005 14:54:19 -0000
      > From: "Steve" <sverba@...>
      > Subject: Re: Mythopoesis (was Questions on the ROTK EE)
      >
      >
      >
      > Ooops, sorry...
      >
      > there is a view that every culture has sets of rules or codes that
      > inform how folks in that culture interpret the world around them. For
      > example, Odysseus got in trouble with the Gods and wandered around ten
      > years before coming home again. Good story, but it also is trying to
      > tell us about the underlying values and codes of the Greeks.
      >
      > If a work of Fantasy (LOTR or Web World novels, etc.) tells a story
      > that resonates (i.e. a narrative that performs transvaluation)with our
      > own underlying cultural values and codes, it is doing Mythopoesis.
      > Some fantasy does so more than others.
      >
      > In short, I think there is a difference between the Fantasy Genre and
      > whether or not a story in that genre is mythopoeic in nature...
      >
      > Since this is the title of this Forum, I figured the topic was
      > relevant. But I am new here and could be wrong.
      >
      > Hope this helps...
      >
      > Steve
      >
      > --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, WendellWag@a... wrote:
      >>
      >> In a message dated 3/9/2005 10:09:54 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
      >> sverba@e... writes:
      >>
      >>> Hmm...I think one relevant explanation of what makes some works of
      > fantasy
      >> more
      >>> mythopoeic than others might involve their degree of
      >> "transvaluation"...that is, the degree to
      >>> which "rules and values of the...various levels of culture are
      > turned back
      >> into or
      >>> reevaluatioed"...in the story...paraphrasing from a nice study "The
      >> Semiotics of Myth" by
      >>> James Liszka...
      >>
      >> I have no idea what this mean or even if it means anything. Could
      > you give
      >> us an example what this means? In what way, for instance, are the
      > rules and
      >> values of various levels of culture re-evaluated in _The Lord of the
      > Rings_?
      >> I hope I've asked this right, but your sentence was so confusing
      > that I had
      >> problems even asking a question about it.
      >>
      >> Wendell Wagner
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > _______________________________________________________________________
      > _
      > _______________________________________________________________________
      > _
      >
      >
      > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
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      David Lenander
      d-lena@...
      2095 Hamline Ave. N.
      Roseville, MN 55113
      651-292-8887
      http://www.umn.edu/~d-lena/RIVENDELL.html
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