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Re: Draggy books

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  • Katie Glick
    ... I loved that book as well ... not least because it got me thinking about all sorts of things and prompted me to learn some real life stuff about the
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 10, 2005
      > Actually, some of my favorite books I might say have "draggy" portions.
      > I adored "The Years of Rice and Salt" by Kim Stanley Robinson and gave
      > copies to my husband, sister, and stepsons. I still think it is one of
      > the more brilliant books I've read in the past few years in spite of the
      > draggy parts (I have a feeling I'm in the minority on this list in
      > liking that book).

      I loved that book as well ... not least because it got me thinking
      about all sorts of things and prompted me to learn some real life
      stuff about the cultures it describes. It also covers an immense
      amount of time and I still felt attached to the characters even though
      none of them remained throughout the book.

      Some of my favorite books also have what you might call "draggy"
      portions. But one of the reasons I like it so much is that the first
      time I read a book that is long and has some portions that take more
      effort to get through than others, is that I tend to skim over those
      parts the first time a little unconsciously in my eagerness to devour
      the story. Then when I go back to the book a second time, armed with
      the knowledge of plot, characters etc. from my first read, I find
      myself able to slow down and enjoy the whole book and really get into
      the parts that are slower going. It's like reading a whole new book,
      sometimes!

      In fact, I have Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norell sitting on my "To Read"
      shelf and I suspect it will be one of those types of books. My
      mother-in-law lent it to me and I'm sorry to say I am afraid she won't
      get it back for quite a while. :)

      Sometimes books that have "draggy" parts--(and Lord of the Rings had
      VERY draggy parts for me when I was reading it at the age of 8, all of
      the Mordor sequences just killed me and I wasn't as interested in any
      scenes that did not contain elves or Aragorn. Hey, I was 8!)--are the
      books that lend themselves the most to re-reading, since on repeated
      reads the draggy parts are not so draggy and they actually yield up
      little surprises, things you didn't notice the first or second or
      third time ...

      -kt
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