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RE: [mythsoc] Re:MISC. and MYTH

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  • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
    That s right... they made Red Dragon into a film, didn t they? They did justice to that whole dental theme? Ewwww I did see Silence of the Lambs. I was
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 3, 2005
      That's right... they made Red Dragon into a film, didn't they? They did
      justice to that whole dental theme? Ewwww

      I did see Silence of the Lambs. I was trying to impress some guy or some
      such silly reason. It was well made,I think, I gotta give it that. I don't
      even like modern television; it's all full of people using nasty tones of
      voice and sloppy thinking.

      (But then, like the guy who reviewed Cutie Honey said, you should
      understand that I liked both of the Charlie's Angels movies -- although in
      my case I've only seen one.)

      But I was thinking today, about modern myths, and do you think that space
      opera is a modern myth? I mean, here we are, essentially stuck on this one
      little rock, and yet there are stories upon stories about life in space,
      from Jules Verne to Star Trek and beyond. It is like a part of our
      mentality, is it some kind of comfort-space, the way some folks say we have
      created religion/God so that we don't feel so alone? People in space
      suits, with big space ships, going hither and thither, are now a totally
      acceptable part of our visioning.

      Course, forty years ago or so, it was slickety hair, a guitar or surfboard,
      and tailfins, right?

      I think Tolkien is beyond our control. He succeeded in ways that he could
      never have imagined in creating a myth for the English and beyond.
      Hobbits, like rabbits, are here to stay, whether we draw them correctly or
      make them into cartoons.

      Lizzie
      Elizabeth Apgar Triano
      lizziewriter@...
      amor vincit omnia
      www.lizziewriter.com
      www.danburymineralogicalsociety.org


      > [Original Message]
      > From: dianejoy@... <dianejoy@...>
      > To: <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
      > Date: 3/3/2005 11:13:16 AM
      > Subject: RE: [mythsoc] Re:MISC.
      >
      >
      >
      > I watched scary movies all the time as a kid; I hated the "Freddy" movies
      > not because they were so scary, but because they were bad horror films.
      > The movie that creeped me out as a kid was *Attack of the Giant Leeches.*
      > Truly bad film. The film that gave me nightmares was one about a woman
      > with cancer, and I think the lead was Carol Burnett, of all people (unless
      > I misremember). My nightmare involved babies with cancer. Strange how
      our
      > minds work. *Red Dragon* was actually a pretty good film. ---djb
    • Debra Murphy
      The film was called MANHUNTER and was directed by Michael Mann. Actually, pretty well done, except that the FBI guy, Will, didn t have the gravitas of the
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 4, 2005
        The film was called MANHUNTER and was directed by Michael Mann. Actually, pretty well done, except that the FBI guy, Will, didn't have the gravitas of the original--a very interesting literary character, more interesting to me than Hannibal Lector. (In the movie, HL was played by the wonderful Brian Cox).

        Yepper, the book was just about the last really creepy thing I ever read. The whole guy-in-a-wheelchair-on-fire thing stuck with me for weeks, and I decided i was just oo much of a wimp to continue with Thomas Harris.

        Surely a "modern myth" would be Mary Shelley's FRANKENSTEIN, and it quickly got out of her control, too--the way of all good myths, and, I think, a sign of health. That which is fixed in stone is dead.

        Debra Murphy
        www.debramurphy.com
        www.themysteryofthings.com
        idyllist.blogspot.com


        ---------- Original Message ----------------------------------
        From: "Elizabeth Apgar Triano" <lizziewriter@...>

        >
        >That's right... they made Red Dragon into a film, didn't they? They did
        >justice to that whole dental theme? Ewwww
        >
        >
        >
        >But I was thinking today, about modern myths, and do you think that space
        >opera is a modern myth?
        >
        >
        >
        >I think Tolkien is beyond our control. He succeeded in ways that he could
        >never have imagined in creating a myth for the English and beyond.
        >Hobbits, like rabbits, are here to stay, whether we draw them correctly or
        >make them into cartoons.
        >
        >Lizzie
        >Elizabeth Apgar Triano
        >lizziewriter@...
        >amor vincit omnia
        >www.lizziewriter.com
        >www.danburymineralogicalsociety.org



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      • Bonnie Callahan
        Hi Lizzie & the corps: We need to make clear the utter uniqueness of the phenomena that was Tolkien-- and the Inklings. I tried to convey T s specialness in
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 4, 2005
          Hi Lizzie & the corps:

          We need to make clear the utter uniqueness of the phenomena that was Tolkien--
          and the Inklings. I tried to convey T's specialness in the 1997 program cover I

          did for the Pepperdine Mythcon. Would that we could see that kind of genius
          and group synergy again in our lifetimes. This is what I want to convey to all
          newcomers. We've been very privileged to experience these authors.

          Bonnie

          Elizabeth Apgar Triano wrote:

          >
          >
          > .....I think Tolkien is beyond our control. He succeeded in ways that he
          > could
          > never have imagined in creating a myth for the English and beyond.
          > Hobbits, like rabbits, are here to stay, whether we draw them correctly or
          > make them into cartoons.
        • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
          Good morning, Bonnie and all; ... Tolkien-- ... cover I ... genius ... to all ... Well, yes, I will agree with that. Tolkien and the Inklings were a
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 5, 2005
            Good morning, Bonnie and all;

            > Hi Lizzie & the corps:
            >
            > We need to make clear the utter uniqueness of the phenomena that was
            Tolkien--
            > and the Inklings. I tried to convey T's specialness in the 1997 program
            cover I
            > did for the Pepperdine Mythcon. Would that we could see that kind of
            genius
            > and group synergy again in our lifetimes. This is what I want to convey
            to all
            > newcomers. We've been very privileged to experience these authors.
            >
            > Bonnie

            Well, yes, I will agree with that. Tolkien and the Inklings were a
            phenomenon not likely to be repeated in our time, however, because our time
            is different from their time. The more I read of and about Tolkien, the
            more I am drawn in and amazed. Charles Williams' Arthuriad had a huge
            impact on my life and thought for about a decade (and is probably just
            latent now).

            I guess I almost thought it was something as a given, and so I felt more
            compelled to defend ongoing myth-watching. I don't read as much as I'd
            like, so I haven't been exposed to as many Tolkien-wannabes (plus, even
            when I do have time, I avoid them -- if a back cover talks about orcs,
            elves, halflings and kings, I don't read it, usually).

            I suspect that only the future will be able to look back and see what the
            corresponding gestalts of our time will have been, and I suspect they will
            not be things that this list would prefer, because they will likely include
            a large electronic-media-visual-interactive aspect. (Can you say,
            EverQuest?)

            A few folks have pointed out that there is mythic fantasy, and non-mythic
            fantasy, and I'll agree with that as well. I still wonder about the mythic
            aspect of space life -- my favorite examples are Norton's Free Traders and
            Janet Morris' Dream Dancer books, but others will have their preferences.
            Our inner lives are not bounded by our cultures being only of this earth.
            Is life in space the spiritual realm of modern times? That which we have
            not truly tasted but "know" must be out there, and can imagine in such
            detail?

            I guess I am a poet type... generally agnostic in the sense of not feeling
            that one can be certain of God or no God and so on, but cannot imagine life
            or thought without the layers that are myth both personal and cultural.
            Apparently there are people out there who eschew the value of myth entirely
            or feel that it can be put in a box. I push people's buttons with
            flippancy, and others push mine with arguments that I feel are patronizing
            and subjective. I stand on the bridge with Dante and experience flashes of
            Great Creation through true contact with treasured other individuals, and
            have some issues with reality I suspect, but that is not everyone's MO.

            and I haven't even been drinking,

            Lizzie

            Elizabeth Apgar Triano
            lizziewriter@...
            amor vincit omnia
            www.lizziewriter.com
            www.danburymineralogicalsociety.org
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