Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Caitlin

Expand Messages
  • hobbitmrw
    I feel I need to chime in on the posting regarding the name Caitlin. My daughter came home from school one day to tell me that her teacher told her that her
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 23, 2005
      I feel I need to chime in on the posting regarding the name Caitlin.
      My daughter came home from school one day to tell me that her teacher
      told her that her name was Irish. I promptly told her to go back and
      tell her teacher that she had a Welsh name. The Irish may use it,
      but I am of Welsh origins and gave her the name because it is Welsh.
      In fact, I recently saw a list of the top ten Welsh names and Caitlin
      is still on it.

      I admit that had I known that so many people were using the name and
      spelling it any way they wanted we probably wouldn't have chosen it,
      but that's no reason for her not to be proud of it. As for Kathleen
      or Kathy, no offense to anyone with those names but I would never
      choose either of them, derivatives or not.

      Matt Williams
      Watertown, Wisconsin
    • alexeik@aol.com
      In a message dated 2/23/5 4:59:13 PM, Matt Williams wrote:
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 24, 2005
        In a message dated 2/23/5 4:59:13 PM, Matt Williams wrote:

        <<In fact, I recently saw a list of the top ten Welsh names and Caitlin

        is still on it.

        >>

        No offense, but even though "Caitlin" may have become a popular Welsh name
        now, it is purely Irish in origin, as its very spelling makes clear. It's an
        Irish version of "Catherine" : in Irish the name [which can be spelled both
        _Caitilín_ and _Caitlín_) is pronounced "CATCH-leen" or "CAT'-leen" (the <it> in
        the spelling stands for palatalised or fricativised 't'). The English spelling
        "Kathleen" is an attempt at reflecting the Munster pronunciation of the name.
        The common pronunciation of Caitlin as "KAYT-lin" is just an Anglo
        interpretation of what the Irish spelling looks like.
        The usual Welsh rendering of "Catherine" is _Cathrin_.
        Alexei
      • Matthew Williams
        Well, it has been used in Wales for a couple hundred years or more and several sources I checked say that it is Welsh which is good enough for me. In any case,
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 25, 2005
          Well, it has been used in Wales for a couple hundred years or more and several sources I checked say that it is Welsh which is good enough for me.

          In any case, as I said before, I'll take it over Katherine or Kathleen any day. And as for it becoming "Anglo-Saxonized," so what! Language changes all the time and many things are not pronounced they way they once were.

          Matt Williams
          Watertown Wisconsin

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.