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movie images and Great Expectations

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  • Katie Glick
    I don t ... Judy Garland in the movie seems way too old
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 22, 2005
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      << For that matter, does _anyone_ alive today read _Wizard of Oz_ and
      _not_ think of Judy Garland? >>

      I don't ... Judy Garland in the movie seems way too old for me to
      successfully picture her as Dorothy whenever I've read the books. I
      was never a big fan of the movie though. I did like the "Return to Oz"
      movie with Fairuza Balk when I was younger and so I think the one time
      I reread the Oz books as an adult, her image definitely crept in
      there.

      I haven't read the LotR since seeing the movie and I wonder if I would
      be able to read it without picturing the characters from the movie. I
      think in the case of the hobbits, Aragorn and Gandalf, the movie
      characters approximated my pre-existing mental images so well, that
      they would become my mental picture, but for characters like Eowyn,
      Galadriel, Arwen, Elrond, Saruman and well, most others, I had strong
      mental images that were quite different than the movie and those would
      probably prevail since I've since the movies only twice (Once for the
      originals and once for the extended versions) and have read the books
      before seeing the movies far more often than that, leaving my own
      creations much more firmly entrenched in my mind than any movie
      images.

      I have a fairly vivid imagination so films very rarely replace the
      visions I have already imagined from reading the literature. Even if I
      see the film before ever reading the book.

      Also:

      <<Katie Glick elsewhere comments that she
      had to read _Great Expectations_ three times before she "got" it--but I
      gather she thinks it was worth it. >>

      I do ... not only because I grew to love the novel, but also because
      it taught me never to give up on literature just because I don't take
      to it on the first read. I now know I can put books away and pick them
      up and try again later and as a result have avoided missing out on
      some things I came to really appreciate later.

      << (I thought _GE_ was one of the
      finest novels I had ever read, but I didn't come to it until I was in
      my mid-twenties and I wonder if I would've been able to appreciate it
      when I was in 9th grade: >>

      I certainly wasn't. I think some things were included in our
      curriculum as introductions to acclaimed authors by way of books with
      characters that we were supposed to relate to, i.e., for Shakespeare,
      we read Romeo & Juliet. We were supposed to relate to Pip as a
      character because he was a young boy growing into adulthood, but
      really, Pip's experience, despite the fact that the themes were
      applicable to our lives in some ways, is nothing like the experience
      of a 14 year old in a small California coastal town. I still have
      memories of the impressions I got from reading it for the first time
      and it's really laughable ... I had a terrible time understanding what
      was happening most of the time and keeping the characters straight, so
      it was in its ultimate effect, like reading about someone's acid trip
      to me. Random boys popping out to fistfight Pip, convicts appearing
      and disappearing, and I never had a sense of how old anyone was
      (except for Miss Havisham) because their behavior and speech was so
      different from any person I had ever experienced.

      I think the catalyst that finally led to my rereading the book for the
      first time was seeing a theater version of it, and then having the
      theater troupe come and do a workshop with my drama class involving
      some of the scenes from the book. Seeing it done visually helped me
      understand the basic plotline better so that I could start to gain a
      real understanding of what was happening, and later see beyond the
      plot to the themes of the book.

      So, to tie this back to Tolkien, perhaps some readers who have not
      been able to get through LotR will be able to go back to it after
      seeing the movie and with a better understanding, read and appreciate
      the books and be smart enough to differentiate between the two. And
      because I am an optimist, perhaps some years in the future, when
      filmmaking has changed and new techniques and technologies we haven't
      dreamt of yet exist, someone will make a new version of the trilogy
      that is more satisfactory to Tolkien scholars. After all, Jackson's
      version did improve on the Rankin/Bass cartoon, so perhaps a future
      version will improve upon this one.

      -kt
    • juliet@firinn.org
      ... I had trouble picturing Judy Garland as Dorothy while watching the movie. I haven t read the book. I had the same problem--she s just too old. Julie
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 22, 2005
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        On Tue, Feb 22, 2005 at 07:01:56PM -0800, Katie Glick wrote:
        >
        > << For that matter, does _anyone_ alive today read _Wizard of Oz_ and
        > _not_ think of Judy Garland? >>
        >
        > I don't ... Judy Garland in the movie seems way too old for me to
        > successfully picture her as Dorothy whenever I've read the books.

        I had trouble picturing Judy Garland as Dorothy while watching the
        movie. I haven't read the book. I had the same problem--she's just
        too old.

        Julie
      • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
        Yah I never liked the Oz movie and I liked the books when I discovered them at a friend s house years later. I thought Judy Garland was way too old and
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 26, 2005
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          Yah I never liked the Oz movie and I liked the books when I discovered them
          at a friend's house years later. I thought Judy Garland was way too old
          and made-up and just dopey! Just a dopey flick. And I like cheesey but I
          guess I don't like cutesy.

          The books were good, strange but good. Love that flying sofa.

          And I don't think of any movie images when I read my beloved Mowgli
          stories, either. "Down, Rama, down!"

          Lizzie

          Elizabeth Apgar Triano
          lizziewriter@...
          amor vincit omnia
          www.lizziewriter.com
          www.danburymineralogicalsociety.org


          > [Original Message]
          > From: Katie Glick <ktglick@...>
          > To: <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
          > Date: 2/22/2005 10:04:00 PM
          > Subject: [mythsoc] movie images and Great Expectations
          >
          >
          > << For that matter, does _anyone_ alive today read _Wizard of Oz_ and
          > _not_ think of Judy Garland? >>
          >
          > I don't ... Judy Garland in the movie seems way too old for me to
          > successfully picture her as Dorothy whenever I've read the books. I
          > was never a big fan of the movie though. I did like the "Return to Oz"
          > movie with Fairuza Balk when I was younger and so I think the one time
          > I reread the Oz books as an adult, her image definitely crept in
          > there.
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