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on the trail of the Succarath

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  • ERATRIANO@aol.com
    I m still tracking my Succarath. Two websites came up in Cyrillic characters, and a friend in Russia kindly made a stab at doing some translating for me....
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 29 4:15 PM
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      I'm still tracking my Succarath. Two websites came up in Cyrillic
      characters, and a friend in Russia kindly made a stab at doing some
      translating for me....

      << SUCCARATH
      In an article,published between 1740 and 1746, was written, that on
      Patagony border some people met a large animal, they called
      Succarath and which usually carries it’s babies on it’s back.
      There was mentioned also, that the local inhabitants hunt it
      for skin to sew coats.This strange beast was also mentioned in
      "The Descriptions of America ", by Andrew Tewe .It was called Su
      and had an unusual feature: when it is in danger, Su puts its babies
      on its back, covers them with its long fluffy tail and flees into
      bushes. Natives used to hunt them by digging a deep pit and covering
      it with fallen leaves. Then they chase Su till it falls into the
      pit. The animal then tries to escape the pit and unwillingly kills
      the babies by pressing them. It’s loud screams scare the natives ,
      but they kill it with their bows and arrows.This description is
      accompanied with a little naive drawing of thin lion with a fluffy
      tail carrying its babies on its back.
      It is possible to assume, that the name Su occurs from a native word
      meaning "water". The professor Àmegino has stated the assumption,
      that su, or sue means "blanket".

      There was also something about what actually is Su,but i couldnt
      translate the name of the animal.I only know that it's a mammal,
      which lives on trees and feed on leaves.It never descends to the
      ground because its legs do not suit for walking.
      >>

      Now, except for the part about the bushy tail, I'm thinking it sounds like a
      tree sloth. I don't know much about the Patagonian fauna. Anybody want to
      hazard some guesses? My original source is an article from Ranger Rick
      [children's] nature magazine from about 1972, on mythical animals. It
      featured the Griffin, Gorgon, Basilisk, Unicorn and Su or Succarath, nicely
      illustrated. The Su, with its woman's head, tiger forequarters, wolf
      hindquarters, palm frond tail and toad-headed offspring, was exotic, and I
      had not heard of it elsewhere either before or since.

      Thanks in advance for any more info.

      Lizzie
    • Steve Schaper
      ... Well, if the last ground sloths weren t dead at the time. . . Their most recent remains were found mummified in Patagonia.
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 29 7:55 PM
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        At 7:15 PM -0500 3/29/00, ERATRIANO@... wrote:
        >From: ERATRIANO@...
        >
        >
        >
        >Now, except for the part about the bushy tail, I'm thinking it sounds like a
        >tree sloth. I don't know much about the Patagonian fauna. Anybody want to
        >hazard some guesses?


        Well, if the last ground sloths weren't dead at the time. . . Their
        most recent remains were found mummified in Patagonia.

        ====================================
        Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
        sschaper@...
        members.delphi.com/sschaper/web/sschaper.html
        ====================================
      • WendellWag@aol.com
        When I put the word succarath into the search engine at www.google.com, I get a page from an Argentinian web site. It s in Spanish, which I can t ... Here s
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 30 4:44 AM
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          When I put the word "succarath" into the search engine at www.google.com, I
          get a page from an Argentinian web site. It's in Spanish, which I can't
          read, but here's the relevant paragraph:

          > En el tomo I, páginas 285-286 de la mencionada obra (edición
          > Lamas, Buenos Aires, 1873) encontramos sobre la fiera
          > patagónica, entre otros el siguiente párrafo: "En los confines de
          > la provincia del Río de la Plata, hácia los patagones, se halla un
          > animal muy fiero llamado Sú ó según otros Succarath, y anda
          > comunmente hacia la ribera de los ríos.

          Here's the URL for this page:

          http://www.argiropolis.com.ar/ameghino/obras/ameghino/neom.htm

          Wendell Wagner
        • Stolzi@aol.com
          In a message dated 3/29/00 6:18:13 PM Central Standard Time, ... I think exotic is putting it mildly. Down the BART with Lisa Goldstein, Mary S
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 30 7:28 AM
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            In a message dated 3/29/00 6:18:13 PM Central Standard Time,
            ERATRIANO@... writes:

            > The Su, with its woman's head, tiger forequarters, wolf
            > hindquarters, palm frond tail and toad-headed offspring, was exotic,

            I think "exotic" is putting it mildly.

            Down the BART with Lisa Goldstein,
            Mary S
          • David S. Bratman
            My Spanish is not that great, but here s a stab at a translation of Wendell s quoted paragraph: In v. 1, p. 285-286 of the above-mentioned work (published by
            Message 5 of 5 , Mar 30 12:31 PM
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              My Spanish is not that great, but here's a stab at a translation of
              Wendell's quoted paragraph:

              In v. 1, p. 285-286 of the above-mentioned work (published by Lamas,
              Buenos Aires, 1873), among the wild beasts of Patagonia, is listed among
              others the following: "In the confines of the province of Rio de la
              Plata, towards Patagonia, is a very fierce animal called Su, or according
              to others Succarath, and it mostly hangs around the riverbanks."

              David Bratman
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