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Re: [mythsoc] Trendy languages & names

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  • Bonnie Callahan
    Wendell & all: Another interesting name thing: When Glen & I were in Wales in 75 I bought a cute little authentically dressed Welsh doll. The name on the
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 21, 2005
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      Wendell & all:

      Another interesting name thing: When Glen & I were in Wales in '75 I bought a cute little
      "authentically dressed" Welsh doll. The name on the packaging was "Eirwen". I asked
      the storekeeper how the name was pronounced, and she replied, "Arwen"!

      I'm surprised that name hasn't caught on with the baby namers. Maybe it's about to!

      Bonnie

      WendellWag@... wrote:

      >
      > In a message dated 2/20/2005 11:05:40 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
      > lizziewriter@... writes:
      >
      > The DVD said that Tolkien based one language on Welsh, and another on
      > Finnish. Could my interest in Welsh have been set off by all those
      > readings of Tolkien early on? (That is my theory on jewelry also, all
      > those ancient crafted things, heh, OK jewelry is a natural inclination
      > though.) So there should be a big rush now for folks to learn Finnish, it
      > should get trendy like Gaelic. I am not quite ready to make that a firm
      > prediction, but my previous ones panned out well (petroglyphs and something
      > else).
      >
      > Wait, are you claiming that the release of the DVD's of the Peter Jackson
      > films is going to cause Finnish to become trendy? Why? It's been known a long
      > time among Tolkien scholars that Finnish and Welsh were some of the major
      > influences on Tolkien's language-creation. I find it hard to believe that the
      > fans of the film are going to be inspired to learn Finnish. I know that
      > we've discussed this before, but the number of people who saw the movies who then
      > went on to become fans of the books is actually relatively small. Most of
      > them didn't even try to read the books. Most of those who did say that they
      > didn't like the books. (Hey, I've talked to some of them, and that's what
      > they say.) Furthermore, in what sense is Welsh or Gaelic trendy?
      > (Incidentally, Welsh is Celtic but not Gaelic.) The only sense that Gaelic is trendy is
      > that a lot of people name their kids with cutesy Irish names. For instance,
      > there are a lot of kids called "Caitlyn." People who name their baby
      > "Caitlyn" ignore the fact that there is already an English equivalent: "Kathleen."
      > Furthermore, in Ireland the name "Caitlyn" is pronounced rather like
      > "Kathleen."
      >
      > Wendell Wagner
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • WendellWag@aol.com
      In a message dated 2/21/2005 6:40:35 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, bonolatm@pacbell.net writes: Another interesting name thing: When Glen & I were in Wales in
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 22, 2005
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        In a message dated 2/21/2005 6:40:35 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
        bonolatm@... writes:

        Another interesting name thing: When Glen & I were in Wales in '75 I bought
        a cute little
        "authentically dressed" Welsh doll. The name on the packaging was "Eirwen".
        I asked
        the storekeeper how the name was pronounced, and she replied, "Arwen"!

        I'm surprised that name hasn't caught on with the baby namers. Maybe it's
        about to!



        I've been keeping a mental list of girls who I've met or heard of named "Arw
        en" and whose names were in fact inspired by Tolkien. I think I've heard of
        eight of them. That's much more than any other name from Tolkien.

        Wendell Wagner


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Mike Foster
        I know of two Galadriels. One is a local librarian who does not go by the name. When she was in kindergarten, the kids were all asked to spell their names &
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 22, 2005
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          I know of two Galadriels. One is a local librarian who does not go by
          the name. When she was in kindergarten, the kids were all asked to
          spell their names & she cried because she couldn't.

          The other is the daughter of the late Duane Allman.

          WendellWag@... wrote:

          >
          >In a message dated 2/21/2005 6:40:35 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
          >bonolatm@... writes:
          >
          >Another interesting name thing: When Glen & I were in Wales in '75 I bought
          >a cute little
          >"authentically dressed" Welsh doll. The name on the packaging was "Eirwen".
          >I asked
          >the storekeeper how the name was pronounced, and she replied, "Arwen"!
          >
          >I'm surprised that name hasn't caught on with the baby namers. Maybe it's
          >about to!
          >
          >
          >
          >I've been keeping a mental list of girls who I've met or heard of named "Arw
          >en" and whose names were in fact inspired by Tolkien. I think I've heard of
          >eight of them. That's much more than any other name from Tolkien.
          >
          >Wendell Wagner
          >
          >
          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
          >Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • David Bratman
          The late webcomic Waiting for Frodo , which featured a couple characters who happened to be named Sam and
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 22, 2005
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            The late webcomic "Waiting for Frodo"
            <http://www.electricpenguin.com/waitingforfrodo/>, which featured a couple
            characters who happened to be named Sam and Rosie, waiting in line for the
            Jackson film, also had another major character who was not a LOTR fan. She
            was called Gladys, and it turned out her real name was Galadriel, which she
            hated partly because she had no interest in Tolkien.

            - David Bratman
          • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
            And I know a girl named Elanor Arwen. And she s about my age (40ish). Re your other post, Wendell, yes, it was a superficial interest in Gaelic etc. that I
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 26, 2005
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              And I know a girl named Elanor Arwen. And she's about my age (40ish).

              Re your other post, Wendell, yes, it was a superficial interest in Gaelic
              etc. that I meant by "trendy". That is the nature of "trendy," which is
              why it is so aggravating when things that one treasures become popularized.
              On the one hand, it means that there are indeed more books and such
              available for one's own purchase and use, but on the other it means that
              there is a ton of junk and a ton of unappreciative users. Oh well, I
              shouldn't be such a snob.

              Lizzie

              Elizabeth Apgar Triano
              lizziewriter@...
              amor vincit omnia
              www.lizziewriter.com
              www.danburymineralogicalsociety.org
              >
              > In a message dated 2/21/2005 6:40:35 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
              > bonolatm@... writes:
              >
              > Another interesting name thing: When Glen & I were in Wales in '75 I
              bought
              > a cute little
              > "authentically dressed" Welsh doll. The name on the packaging was
              "Eirwen".
              > I asked
              > the storekeeper how the name was pronounced, and she replied, "Arwen"!
              >
              > I'm surprised that name hasn't caught on with the baby namers. Maybe
              it's
              > about to!
              >
              >
              >
              > I've been keeping a mental list of girls who I've met or heard of named
              "Arw
              > en" and whose names were in fact inspired by Tolkien. I think I've
              heard of
              > eight of them. That's much more than any other name from Tolkien.
              >
              > Wendell Wagner
              >
              >
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