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NYTs article on new Narnia Movie

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  • Stolzi
    Long, a good deal of interesting speculation. http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/20/movies/20kehr.html As a franchise, the possibilities of Narnia seem almost
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 20, 2005
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      Long, a good deal of interesting speculation.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/20/movies/20kehr.html

      'As a franchise, the possibilities of "Narnia" seem almost unlimited. It's
      "Harry Potter" with intellectual respectability and deep cultural roots.

      'But how Disney plans to wrestle the Lewis books into line remains a closely
      held secret.'

      For some early peeks into the Wardrobe go here

      http://aint-it-cool-news.com/display.cgi?id=18980

      Scroll down for the three pics; the painting of Prof. Kirke's house looks a
      close double for Pauline Baynes' idea of same, though I was surprised to see
      the children arriving in a pony cart - might make sense in the era of
      gasoline rationing, though.

      In the little WETA movie I caught a glimpse of what I think was Lucy's
      phial - beautiful!

      Diamond Proudbrook
    • Stolzi
      The WETA movie (which can be linked to at http://aint-it-cool-news.com/display.cgi?id=18980) did give me an uneasy feeling because it showed so many, many
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 21, 2005
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        The WETA movie (which can be linked to at
        http://aint-it-cool-news.com/display.cgi?id=18980) did give me an uneasy
        feeling because it showed so many, many monsters in development. Of course
        there IS an army of monsters appearing in the climactic battle of LION
        ("Ogres ... and wolves .. and bull-headed men ....Cruels and Hags and
        Incubuses, Wraiths, Horrors, Efreets, Sprites, Orknies, Wooses, and
        Ettins"), but I certainly fear a Jacksonization of the film.

        Let us hope that this para from the TIMES article is an overstatement

        'Based on the available material, Disney seems to be going for a strict
        "sword and sorcery" look, as the genre is known to its fans: dark, muddy,
        full of clanking metal and grunting extras. Though the climactic battle
        scene occupies only a page and a half of Lewis's original text for "The
        Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe," it seems certain to figure much more
        strongly in the film. This looks like Disney's way of appeasing the teenage
        sword and sorcery fans, who have a large, well-organized presence on the
        Internet and whose early support of the project is crucial.'

        On the other hand, how joyful it would be if SFX can give us a worthy
        version of the miraculous spring succeeding the Witch's winter, and the
        statues coming back to life!

        Diamond Proudbrook
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