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RE: [mythsoc] Question about the ROTK extended

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  • Rateliff, John
    ... Alan Lee did these; someone asked him about them when he gave his speech/slide slow presentation/signing here in Seattle. I believe they ll be in his new
    Message 1 of 124 , Feb 19, 2005
      > ----------
      > From: Elizabeth Apgar Triano
      > Can someone please tell me where
      > those pencil/charcoal sketches come from? Can I get copies?
      >
      Alan Lee did these; someone asked him about them when he gave his speech/slide slow presentation/signing here in Seattle. I believe they'll be in his new book when it comes out this fall. According to amazon.co.uk, the title is THE "LORD OF THE RINGS" SKETCHBOOK: PORTFOLIO and it has a release date of Sept. 5th.


      re. Pookah, Briggs has three entries. They're too long to type in, so I'll summarize.
      (1) Puck. This is the English version, formerly also spelled Pouk. Some stories make pucks out to be tricksters, others malicious devils. Shakespeare's Puck in A Midsummer Night's Dream has pretty well buried the older versions and made him the equivalent of Robin Goodfellow (that is, a hob). He's a traditional hob-goblin, sometimes leading people astray like a will o' the wisp, sometimes helping them like a brownie.

      (2) Pwca (pronounced "pooka"). The Welsh version. Does chores, but misbehaves when his rights are not respected. Loves to mislead travellers at night (will o' the wisp).

      (3) Phouka (pronounced "pooka"). The Irish version. A devil or a bogeyman. Likes to take the form of a horse and carry off the unsuspecting. Also sometimes described more like a hob: tricksy or helpful depending on the circumstances.


      The best-known use of pookas in modern fantasy I can think of is Mary Chase's Harvey, better known for inspiring the Jimmy Stewart movie. This is a whimsical, helpful pooka. That he takes the form of an invisible giant rabbit is Chase's own invention; she's imitating the late great Thorne Smith. This is what most people think of today when they hear the word "pooka".

      Flann O'Brien At Swim's Two Birds. The pooka in this Irish novel is a devil, rather like a casual, experienced, easygoing Screwtape; he's a minor character who wins a major character's soul in a game of cards with his guardian spirit. Weird (though not as weird as The Third Policeman) but highly recommended. This is a very traditional Irish pooka.

      War for the Oaks by Emma Bull. I could be mistaken, since it's years since I read this one, but I'm pretty sure one of the main characters turns out to be a pooka. He appears in human form and becomes the heroine's love interest; this is an urban fantasy take on the pooka legend.

      Of course, there's also Kipling's rather cutesy Puck (Puck of Pook's Hill; Rewards & Fairies), who takes some children through a tour of English history, but for my money the best hobs in modern fantasy are the ones in Briggs' novel Hobberty Dick.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Carnimiriel Isilraen
      Alisson Veldhuis wrote: (responding to my post about my novel in progress) ... Thank you for your comments! I hope your novel is going well. I d be
      Message 124 of 124 , Mar 9, 2005
        Alisson Veldhuis wrote: (responding to my post about my novel in progress)

        > I can sympathise with your struggles to
        >try to create your very own fantasy/mythological world, without copying that of others, since I myself am working on a novel now with a mythological theme. It is very enjoyable, but difficult. I too have only had close family member's read it, so it is hard to get objective views.
        >
        >
        Thank you for your comments! I hope your novel is going well. I'd be
        interested to hear about your novel. Feel free to respond off list if
        you don't want to post about it here.

        Ellen
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