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Book of the Three Dragons

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  • Lisa Padol
    Knock me over with a feather! Kenneth Morris Book of the Three Dragons is back in print, for $12, from Cold Spring Press, with the material that the publisher
    Message 1 of 12 , Feb 5, 2005
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      Knock me over with a feather! Kenneth Morris' Book of the Three Dragons
      is back in print, for $12, from Cold Spring Press, with the material
      that the publisher cut from the original edition, on the theory that
      the book was too long. I am astonished! I bought a copy at once, of
      course. Did I miss an email on this?

      -Lisa Padol




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    • Douglas A. Anderson
      ... It s the first in a series of fantasy classics that I m editing for Cold Spring Press. I was very pleased to see that book finally published in its
      Message 2 of 12 , Feb 6, 2005
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        Lisa Padol wrote:

        > Knock me over with a feather! Kenneth Morris' Book of the Three Dragons
        > is back in print, for $12, from Cold Spring Press, with the material
        > that the publisher cut from the original edition, on the theory that
        > the book was too long. I am astonished! I bought a copy at once, of
        > course. Did I miss an email on this?

        It's the first in a series of fantasy classics that I'm editing for Cold
        Spring Press. I was very pleased to see that book finally published in its
        complete form. In the new edition the novel runs to 227 pages, of which 55
        pages were previously unpublished, so it's no small amount.

        The next book up in the series is Lud-in-the-Mist by Hope Mirrlees,
        reprinted from the 1926 first edition. Like with the Morris, I did a short
        Intro on the author, but this book adds a Foreword by Neil Gaiman.
        Lud-in-the-Mist should be in stores around the end of this month, or early
        March.

        Among the others lined up for summer and fall is an anthology I'm editing,
        Seekers of Dreams, and a reissue of The Marvellous Land of Snergs by E. A.
        Wyke-Smith, Tolkien's "source-book for hobbits".

        Doug A.
      • WendellWag@aol.com
        In a message dated 2/6/2005 10:42:12 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, nodens@locallink.net writes: The next book up in the series is Lud-in-the-Mist by Hope
        Message 3 of 12 , Feb 6, 2005
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          In a message dated 2/6/2005 10:42:12 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
          nodens@... writes:

          The next book up in the series is Lud-in-the-Mist by Hope Mirrlees,
          reprinted from the 1926 first edition. Like with the Morris, I did a short
          Intro on the author, but this book adds a Foreword by Neil Gaiman.
          Lud-in-the-Mist should be in stores around the end of this month, or early
          March.


          Does this new edition have anything that the Millennium/Fantasy Masterworks
          edition (a British paperback edition that I own) doesn't, except for your
          introduction? There's a foreword by Gaiman in the Fantasy Masterworks edition.
          Does the Cold Spring edition have anything different in the text by Mirrlees?

          Wendell Wagner


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Lisa Padol
          ... Bless you and bless Le Guin! This plus The Fates of the Princes of Dyved is the whole story? ... Yay! -Lisa __________________________________ Do you
          Message 4 of 12 , Feb 6, 2005
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            > It's the first in a series of fantasy classics that I'm editing for
            > Cold
            > Spring Press. I was very pleased to see that book finally published
            > in its
            > complete form. In the new edition the novel runs to 227 pages, of
            > which 55
            > pages were previously unpublished, so it's no small amount.

            Bless you and bless Le Guin! This plus The Fates of the Princes of
            Dyved is the whole story?

            > The next book up in the series is Lud-in-the-Mist by Hope Mirrlees,

            Yay!

            -Lisa





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          • David Lenander
            Yes, another of Doug Anderson s many projects. I d not heard of this before finding it in the bookstore a week ago. I bought a copy, too. Who knew that
            Message 5 of 12 , Feb 6, 2005
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              Yes, another of Doug Anderson's many projects. I'd not heard of this
              before finding it in the bookstore a week ago. I bought a copy, too.
              Who knew that Morris had written a different ending? As usual, we owe
              many thanks to Doug.

              > Message: 4
              > Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2005 18:01:11 -0800 (PST)
              > From: Lisa Padol <lpadol@...>
              > Subject: Book of the Three Dragons
              >
              > Knock me over with a feather! Kenneth Morris' Book of the Three Dragons
              > is back in print, for $12, from Cold Spring Press, with the material
              > that the publisher cut from the original edition, on the theory that
              > the book was too long. I am astonished! I bought a copy at once, of
              > course. Did I miss an email on this?
              >
              > -Lisa Padol
              >
              >
              David Lenander
              d-lena@...
              2095 Hamline Ave. N.
              Roseville, MN 55113
              651-292-8887
              http://www.umn.edu/~d-lena/RIVENDELL.html
            • Douglas A. Anderson
              ... Dyved is the whole story? Yup. Fates and 3 Dragons are companion books, though I wouldn t quite call the latter a sequel. Those two, with The Chalichiuhite
              Message 6 of 12 , Feb 7, 2005
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                Lisa wrote:

                > Bless you and bless Le Guin! This plus The Fates of the Princes of
                Dyved is the whole story?

                Yup. Fates and 3 Dragons are companion books, though I wouldn't quite call
                the latter a sequel. Those two, with The Chalichiuhite Dragon (1992) and The
                Dragon Path: Collected Tales of Kenneth Morris (1995), and you have
                Morris's complete fiction (unless there are any lost tales in obscure
                magazines).

                Here's the introduction I wrote for 3 Dragons.

                Introduction

                In her 1973 landmark essay "From Elfland to Poughkeespie," Ursula K. Le Guin
                singled out three writers as master stylists of fantasy: J. R. R. Tolkien,
                E. R. Eddison, and Kenneth Morris. Tolkien's writings are well-known, and
                E. R. Eddison's first novel, The Worm Ouroboros, has considerable renown.
                But in 1973 the writings of Kenneth Morris were unknown to most readers. We
                owe it to Le Guin that, in the years since her essay was published, Morris
                has gained some of the acclaim that he deserves.
                Morris was born in Wales in 1879. Even as a child his imagination was
                nurtured by Welsh folktales and by the Mabinogion, the primary collection of
                Welsh mythological stories surviving from medieval times. Usually published
                as a book containing eleven tales, only four (each of which is named as a
                separate "branch") are considered to be part of the Mabinogion proper.
                Morris's father died when he was six, and the family moved to London, where
                he was educated at the famous school Christ's Hospital. In 1896 he visited
                Dublin and encountered the Theosophical Society, which he joined
                enthusiastically. Morris remained devoted to theosophical ideals, like the
                universal brotherhood of all mankind, for the rest of his life. In 1908 he
                moved to southern California to teach at the International Headquarters of
                the Theosophical Society. He stayed there-at Point Loma, near San Diego-for
                twenty-two years. In 1930 he returned to Wales, where he died in 1937 at
                the age of fifty-seven.
                Morris was a prolific writer, publishing a great number of essays, poems,
                dramas, and stories in various Theosophical magazines. With regard to
                fiction, Morris wrote three novels and about forty short stories. Two of
                the novels, The Fates of the Princes of Dyfed (1914) and Book of the Three
                Dragons (1930), are imaginative re-workings of Welsh mythological stories.
                His other novel is a fantasy of the ancient Toltecs of central Mexico.
                Titled The Chalchiuhite Dragon, it was first published in 1992. Of Morris's
                short stories, ten were collected in 1926 under the title The Secret
                Mountain and Other Tales. All of his short stories, ranging through the
                mythologies of the world (Celtic, Norse, Greek, Roman, Taoist, Buddhist,
                etc.), were gathered in The Dragon Path: Collected Tales of Kenneth Morris
                (1995).


                Morris wrote both The Fates of the Princes of Dyfed and Book of the Three
                Dragons around 1910-14, but only the former was published at that time. It
                was not successful. In the late 1920s, when Morris returned to Book of the
                Three Dragons, he was critical of the style of the first book: "I was in a
                very Welsh mood when I wrote the Fates -in 1910-1911-and managed to write as
                if it were Welsh. Of course very few in Wales are interested in it: a few
                are. That piling up of adjectives in English is a dangerous ploy: the worst
                American after dinner ranters do it ghastlily. But there, with the robes of
                my Welshness and Welsh moods of thought on me, I walked along gaily
                oblivious of my peril." Having re-read Fates, and having "found the
                ornament so thick in places I lost the thread of story in reading," Morris
                determined that should not be the case with Book of the Three Dragons, and
                went to it "with a severe blue pencil, cutting out ornament left and right."
                Morris was correct to do so-Book of the Three Dragons shows a maturity of
                style well beyond that in the earlier book. It is also considerably more
                imaginative. The Fates of the Princes of Dyfed is a fairly close retelling
                of the first branch of the Mabinogion, telling the story of Pwyll and his
                journey to the Otherworld. Book of the Three Dragons is Morris's recasting
                and reshaping of the other branches into a story of his own. Inexplicably,
                when it was first published, the ending of Book of the Three Dragons was
                simply lopped off. The surviving correspondence is unclear, but evidently
                the publisher felt that the book was too long. This edition of Book of the
                Three Dragons publishes for the first time Morris's ending, his fifth and
                sixth branches, amounting to approximately one-third as much again of what
                was originally published.
                Book of the Three Dragons appeared in September 1930. It was chosen as a
                selection of the Junior Literary Guild, and achieved more notice than any of
                Morris's other books. Favorable reviews appeared in the New York World, the
                New York Herald Tribune Books, the Atlantic Monthly, and the Horn Book.
                Morris's true achievement went unnoticed for many years, but with his two
                books, and especially with Book of the Three Dragons, Morris essentially
                invented the sub-genre of modern Celtic fantasy. In "From Elfland to
                Poughkeepsie" Ursula K. Le Guin described Book of the Three Dragons as "a
                singularly fine example of the recreation of a work magnificent in its own
                right (the Mabinogion)-a literary event rather rare except in fantasy, where
                its frequency is perhaps proof, if one were needed, of the ever-renewed
                vitality of myth." Le Guin's comments are precisely correct, and thanks to
                her championing, Book of the Three Dragons has also achieved the status of a
                modern fantasy classic.


                Douglas A. Anderson
              • Douglas A. Anderson
                ... before finding it in the bookstore a week ago. I bought a copy, too. Thanks, David. You might be interested to know that an illustrated Dutch translation
                Message 7 of 12 , Feb 7, 2005
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                  David wrote:

                  > Yes, another of Doug Anderson's many projects. I'd not heard of this
                  before finding it in the bookstore a week ago. I bought a copy, too.

                  Thanks, David. You might be interested to know that an illustrated Dutch
                  translation of The Fates of the Princes of Dyfed appeared late last year.
                  It has 55 illustrations by Yolanda Eveleens. Here's the URL:

                  http://www.theosofie.net/literatuur/vorstenvandyfed.html

                  Doug A.
                • Rateliff, John
                  Hmm. I seem to be luckier than most, since I picked up a copy a month or two ago (at Borders, I think). Very much looking forward to reading it. I ve delayed
                  Message 8 of 12 , Feb 7, 2005
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                    Hmm. I seem to be luckier than most, since I picked up a copy a month or two ago (at Borders, I think). Very much looking forward to reading it. I've delayed so far because I know that once I'm done there will be no more Morris left for me to read; re-reading will have to do.
                    If anyone needs more encouragement to read it than (a) it was written by Morris and (b) it was edited by Doug, here's my plug, taken from an on-line piece I wrote about it the book:

                    'Book of the Three Dragons is perhaps the single best fantasy adaptation from a real-world mythology (in this case, the Welsh Mabinogion), and the best of his tales (e.g., "The Saint and the Forest-Gods", "The Last Adventure of Don Quixote", and perhaps "Red-Peach-Blossom Inlet") are among the finest fantasy short stories ever written.'

                    http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=books/main/classicsbook3dragons


                    > ----------
                    > From: David Lenander
                    > Reply To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Sunday, February 6, 2005 1:22 PM
                    > To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
                    > Cc: Douglas Anderson
                    > Subject: [mythsoc] Book of the Three Dragons
                    >
                    > Yes, another of Doug Anderson's many projects. I'd not heard of this
                    > before finding it in the bookstore a week ago. I bought a copy, too.
                    > Who knew that Morris had written a different ending? As usual, we owe
                    > many thanks to Doug.
                    >


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Anne Petty
                    If you look on the last page of _The Book of the Three Dragons_, you ll see the Cold Spring Press Fiction listing. Right below _Lud-in-the-Mist_ you ll see the
                    Message 9 of 12 , Feb 12, 2005
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                      If you look on the last page of _The Book of the Three Dragons_,
                      you'll see the Cold Spring Press Fiction listing. Right below
                      _Lud-in-the-Mist_ you'll see the title _Thin Line Between_. That's my
                      new novel. *toots own horn softly*

                      Cheers,
                      Anne Petty
                      acp@...

                      --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, "Douglas A. Anderson" <nodens@l...> wrote:
                      >
                      > It's the first in a series of fantasy classics that I'm editing for Cold
                      > Spring Press. I was very pleased to see that book finally published
                      >
                      > Among the others lined up for summer and fall is an anthology I'm
                      editing,
                      > Seekers of Dreams, and a reissue of The Marvellous Land of Snergs by
                      E. A.
                      > Wyke-Smith, Tolkien's "source-book for hobbits".
                      >
                      > Doug A.
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